What to do with grandparents WW2 stuff

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guthrie
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What to do with grandparents WW2 stuff

Postby guthrie » Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:38 pm

When clearing out my grans attic, my dad found my grandfathers WW2 naval hats. They are still in good condition, I think it was HMS Argus he was on, as a marine. He can't quite decide whether to keep them or get rid of them.
But how to get rid of them? Throw them in the bin? Is there a museum that might be itnerested? Do people collect these things?

Or should we keep them, as potential dressing up materials, and a nice example of costume history given that they are made of canvas with many coats of that whiste stuff whose name I cannot remember. The hats remind me of how much different things are now, clothes and material wise, to what they were back then.

So does anyone have any bright ideas, or thoughts about how they treat thier WW2 etc equipment and clothes?



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matlot
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Postby matlot » Sat Jul 01, 2006 8:19 am

try contacting the rm museum
Royal Marines Museum Southsea, Hampshire, PO4 9PX Tel: 023 9281 9385 Fax: 023 9283 8420 E-mail: [url]info@royalmarinesmuseum.co.uk[/url]

or the rn museum
HM Naval Base (PP66), Portsmouth, PO1 3NH
Telephone: 023 9272 7562
Fax: 023 9272 7575

or as the argus was a carrier
Fleet Air Arm Museum
Box D6, RNAS Yeovilton
Near Ilchester, Somerset
BA22 8HT

Tel: +44 (0) 1935 840565
Fax: +44 (0) 1935 842630
E-mail:[url]info@fleetairarm.com[/url]
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hms argus.jpg
hms argus in "dazzle camouflage"
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guthrie
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Postby guthrie » Sat Jul 01, 2006 11:29 pm

Wow, thanks!

As an aside, did that zebra like dazzle camouflage actually make a difference? It doesnt look like it to me just now, but I have no idea about actual conditions of use.

PS- as for the amateur building the ark, I understand he had some pretty good back room support.



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Jenn R
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Postby Jenn R » Sat Jul 01, 2006 11:33 pm

As far as I know the zebra marking break up the outline of the ship and it makes it harder to see.


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John Waller
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Postby John Waller » Mon Jul 03, 2006 9:18 am

Jenn R wrote:As far as I know the zebra marking break up the outline of the ship and it makes it harder to see.


What ship?


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m300572
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Postby m300572 » Mon Jul 03, 2006 12:47 pm

As far as I know the zebra marking break up the outline of the ship and it makes it harder to see.


Big problem with ships is that when viewed through a sub periscope they are fairly obvious, be they painted grey, dazzle or sky blue pink. One of the reasons for dazzle camouflage ('zebra' was one of the options) was to make it harder to work out the speed and heading of the ship thus making it harder for the sub commander to work out how much lead to give when he fired - when shooting at a moving object it is necesary to aim in front of the target so that the target and projectile converge - particularly important with slow moving projectiles like torpedoes at long range. Some dazzle schemes painted a big bow wave o nthe ship to make it look faster, so the torpedoes would pass in front.




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