Choosing a sewing machine?

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Tuppence
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Post by Tuppence »

bernina sweetie

My one is an activa 145 (which I don't think they do now but they will have a newer one in the range).

a positive baby compared to my 108 sport (sport cos it has a handle on the top :lol: )

any machine with any power behind it will go through a finger - that's why you have to be careful.

my nana's ancient beast (the one on which I learned to sew as a kid) went straight through her finger in 1960-something. fortnately the bit was re-attached* she always looked on it as her own fault cos she (literally) took her eye off the needle.

*sorry if that's too yucky!

worst i've ever done is go through som fingernails when v v tired.
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Shadowcat
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Post by Shadowcat »

When I saw this accident happen, some idiot said "Oh, you have to sew through your finger to be a proper seamstress!" In which case I am not a proper seamstress as I have never sewn through myself. Bashed my arthritic knuckles on the needle lever a few dozen times though!


S.

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Queen of the Night
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Post by Queen of the Night »

The one thing I would have fought my brother for tooth and nail after Mum died was her Singer Featherlight Sewing Machine.

She saved up for it and bought it new from Lewis's in Birmingham in 1954. It still has the receipt, instruction book and original bobbins etc in it.

I love it as not only is it a fantastic machine (but probably not as sturdy as you need Sally!) but it reminds me of the wonderful dresses I made using it and about my Mum teaching me to sew.

It would be one of the things I would save in a fire/flood (the others being Andy obviously and my panda).

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Sir Fletcher Phelps
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Post by Sir Fletcher Phelps »

Queen of the Night wrote:The one thing I would have fought my brother for tooth and nail after Mum died was her Singer Featherlight Sewing Machine.

She saved up for it and bought it new from Lewis's in Birmingham in 1954. It still has the receipt, instruction book and original bobbins etc in it.

I love it as not only is it a fantastic machine (but probably not as sturdy as you need Sally!) but it reminds me of the wonderful dresses I made using it and about my Mum teaching me to sew.

It would be one of the things I would save in a fire/flood (the others being Andy obviously and my panda).


I'd never have stood in the way of you and that Singer - I know how much you love it.....and it is a fantastic piece of engineering, that even smells right!
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X
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Post by X »

My backup machine is a Janome - it's ten years old and has moved house multiple times. It's been serviced a couple of times, and never given me a problem. The only problem is that there is only one shop where I live that stocks the parts (for occasions like when I lost the foot). It's a next-to-bottom-of-the-range mechanical and great for historical kit.

My best machine is a computerised Juki that does everything except make the tea at the touch of a button. I'm in love and don't care admitting it. However, if I was only making historical kit I wouldn't have bought it as there's no point having 90 embroidery stitches and letters of the alphabet if you can't use them. I also wouldn't have bought it if I didn't spend a significant amount of time in London, as that's where one of the few suppliers is - a small, family-run business (sometimes you get served by the grandson, who is about twelve).

So I would say that one of the things you need to consider is customer service - buy your machine from a shop that is likely to be efficient at servicing and understanding when you ask really dumb questions. Local is good if possible.

But I would add my voice to the recommenders of Janome - I like mine, and the people who sold me the Juki agreed that Janome were also very good.

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