Anglo-Saxon Chronicle help

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SirUlf
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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle help

Postby SirUlf » Mon Oct 14, 2013 11:02 pm

I'm looking for something which doesn't seem to be available, so thought I'd ask the learned minds on here before I give up all hope. I'd quite like the combined Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, in one book, with BOTH the modern and Old English texts included, ideally in parallel. Is such a thing available anywhere...? Reading it in modern English I always wonder what it sounds like in Old English, and reading it in Old English I'm always wondering what some of it means...



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Brother Ranulf
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Chronicle help

Postby Brother Ranulf » Tue Oct 15, 2013 6:44 am

That would certainly be an interesting publication, but I do not believe that such a thing exists. The late Old English texts would be of little interest to most readers and would therefore represent unjustified cost as far as publishers are concerned. The other point to mention is that the AS Chronicles are really many different manuscripts which are each different but overlap in terms of content and some have slightly different timelines; there is therefore considerable repetition in their texts but not always relating to the same date - this would throw up a horrible mess of texts if all the originals were to be included.

The best modern translations of all the different original texts is in "The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles; New Edition" by Michael Swanton, Phoenix Press 2000, which extends to 364 pages; including the texts of all the original manuscripts would certainly double that size - and that does not take into account the problems of translation which Swanton touches on briefly in his introduction. As he says, whole books have been devoted to the complexities of meaning of individual OE words, such as the many compounds with the element slean.

Edit: One possible option would be to find the OE texts online and use Swanton's reliable translation alongside them. There is an XML edition at http://asc.jebbo.co.uk/
Go to the section "Literary Editions" along the top and choose a manuscript (I like manuscript E - the Bodleian MS Laud 636 - because it includes the first half of the 12th century).
I hope this helps.


Brother Ranulf

"Patres nostri et nos hanc insulam in brevi edomuimus in brevi nostris subdidimus legibus, nostris obsequiis mancipavimus" - Walter Espec 1138

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Medicus Matt
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Chronicle help

Postby Medicus Matt » Wed Oct 16, 2013 4:53 pm

Brother Ranulf wrote:That would certainly be an interesting publication, but I do not believe that such a thing exists. .


8)I've got one.
This one:-
http://www.amazon.com/The-Saxon-Chronic ... 1858910838

It's quarto size printed on good stock and is a reprint of Ingram's 1823 conflation of the various manuscripts, with the Old English text side by side with the modern English.
It also includes his forward which is a discussion on the various manuscripts and a brief Old English primer.
Not the most portable edition (I've got my little old pocket Everyman for that) but well worth having, especially as you can pick it up for buttons from various 2nd hand sellers on Abe.
http://www.abebooks.co.uk/book-search/i ... 38/page-1/


"I never said that I was here to help."

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Brother Ranulf
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Chronicle help

Postby Brother Ranulf » Thu Oct 17, 2013 6:56 am

It's also available as an e-book online here: http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=O8U_ ... &q&f=false

I would not suggest it to anyone since it is a very unreliable and outdated translation of just one manuscript (E); apart from the dodgy translation, it has been noted elsewhere that "While Ingram's footnotes are included in this translation, they should be used with extreme care. In many cases the views expressed by Ingram are severely out of date, having been superseded by almost 175 years of active scholarship. At best, these notes will provide a starting point for inquiry. They should not, however, be treated as absolute." Swanton's modern translation of all the manuscripts is a far more worthwhile option.

The original question specified "the combined Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, in one book, with BOTH the modern and Old English texts included", meaning all of the surviving manuscripts and not just one, which I repeat that I do not believe that such a thing exists.


Brother Ranulf



"Patres nostri et nos hanc insulam in brevi edomuimus in brevi nostris subdidimus legibus, nostris obsequiis mancipavimus" - Walter Espec 1138

Benedict
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Re: Anglo-Saxon Chronicle help

Postby Benedict » Fri Oct 18, 2013 12:17 pm

I've always used Dorothy Whitelock's translation in 'English Historical Documents' v 1 (597-1042) and v2 (1042-), which puts the assorted rescensions side by side (where they are substantially different). Unhelpfully it's split across two volumes (well, a whole series), but the second one lets you read the main Chronicle rescensions for Edward the Confessor through the earlier Anglo-Norman period. They are also brick-thick, expensive and only give a translation.

The closest thing is likely to be the series of editions of the ASC, many of which are (I think) edited by David Dumville. But these are obviously separate volumes (and a surprising number of them), and of somewhat niche interest.

This does sound as though it would be better tackled as an online resource, rather like the Early English laws project. As Brother Ranulph says, the real value comes from comparing individual manuscripts rather than just the overall rescensions, and that becomes geeky even by Anglo-Saxonists' standards.




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