Interesting article

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
IDEEDEE
Posts: 146
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 6:47 pm
Location: Brighthelmstone-on-sea

Interesting article

Postby IDEEDEE » Sun Oct 13, 2013 11:51 am

Another interesting article on the Medievalists re. "elites" and portable property 650-1150...

Quote: "... focuses on coastal and maritime communities which have portable wealth. These are small settlements and farmsteads, but have imported pottery, silk, fine weaponry For example in coastal Flanders and Denmark we see imported luxuries – everybody has them – which suggests access to wealth over a much wider social spectrum than in interior areas.

By the 10th century we see the transformation of major port towns like York, Dublin, London were becoming global networks -for example by the year 1000 significant quantites of pepper being brought into London. The wealth of these places was becoming evident in the archaeological finds. At York, Coppergate we find riding gear, spears, other high quality goods, once thought just to belong to landed elites". etc. etc.


http://www.medievalists.net/2011/11/04/the-dynamics-of-landed-and-portable-wealth-defining-elites-in-northwest-europe-from-an-archaeological-perspective-between-ad-650-and-1150/



User avatar
Brother Ranulf
Post Centurion
Posts: 947
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 7:46 pm
Location: Canterbury

Re: Interesting article

Postby Brother Ranulf » Sun Oct 13, 2013 4:01 pm

At York, Coppergate we find riding gear, spears, other high quality goods, once thought just to belong to landed elites". etc. etc.


My understanding is that the Coppergate finds are mainly attributed to manufacturing workshops and dealers in goods rather than indicating status/ownership. It's a fact that the Norse influences in manufactured goods from York persisted long after it had disappeared elsewhere, signifying a continuity of styles of manufacture, not ownership - such as the typically Scandinavian 5-lobed sword pommels still being made in York well into the 12th century which are not seen in other parts of the country.

The fact that high status goods are found at Coppergate definitely does not imply ownership by low status individuals, any more than stained glass would be found in the homes of those who produced it.


Brother Ranulf

"Patres nostri et nos hanc insulam in brevi edomuimus in brevi nostris subdidimus legibus, nostris obsequiis mancipavimus" - Walter Espec 1138

User avatar
IDEEDEE
Posts: 146
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 6:47 pm
Location: Brighthelmstone-on-sea

Re: Interesting article

Postby IDEEDEE » Sun Oct 13, 2013 4:45 pm

You are right, context is all. Was only quoting from the article...

You can tell it's a rainy day.. here's another (different subject).
http://www.medievalists.net/2012/11/14/death-on-the-dorset-ridgeway-a-viking-murder-mystery/



User avatar
Brother Ranulf
Post Centurion
Posts: 947
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 7:46 pm
Location: Canterbury

Re: Interesting article

Postby Brother Ranulf » Sun Oct 13, 2013 9:32 pm

No offence intended, but that first article does not seem to have been properly thought through which is a shame. If I were being unkind (I will not be!) I could suggest that Christopher Loveluck came up with a theory and then tried to make the facts fit, which I am sure he would never dream of doing since it would break the "Prime Directive" of historical research . . .

The second one is very interesting and takes me back to my early teenage years and a brief outing with the Dorchester Archaeological group at a certain hillfort not far from the site of this burial pit. I was helping to dig Roman levels within the hillfort and was amazed to find a Roman anchor, which turned out to be the star find that season. The experienced archaeologists quickly took over with uncovering and removing it from the trench while I went off and ate my packed lunch - I never did find out why you might need an anchor on top of the Dorset ridgeway :D


Brother Ranulf



"Patres nostri et nos hanc insulam in brevi edomuimus in brevi nostris subdidimus legibus, nostris obsequiis mancipavimus" - Walter Espec 1138


Return to “410-1100”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests