lang sax? long sax? lang seax? long seax?

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Benedict
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Re: lang sax? long sax? lang seax? long seax?

Postby Benedict » Mon Feb 14, 2011 2:47 pm

I'm interested by the merits of wood-handled langseaxes. I got one second-hand as my first weapon, but use over a season or so (including regular training - them were the days!) led to the wood splitting. Strapping it up with linen (and liberal glue) kept it going a little bit longer. I replaced the wooden grip with antler and it's been fine since... though it's hardly seen action thanks to having swords, spears etc.

I'd be interested in any evidence for different materials (antler, bone, wood) on seaxes - assuming there are traces.



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Captain Reech
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Re: lang sax? long sax? lang seax? long seax?

Postby Captain Reech » Tue Feb 15, 2011 3:35 pm

WorkMonkey3 wrote:Battersea seax has no intact grip, nor do any other seaxs, or swords for that matter so trying to say whether or not they had leather on would be impossible I would have thought. It's conjectural, when you have plain wood thats waxed or polished it tends to get sweat build ups, and dirt trapped in the grain that makes it go all black, ugly, and slippy. Putting leather on means when the leather gets worn down, greasy, dirty etc it can just be taken off and replaced, as apposed to having to take the whole hilt apart and sand the grip down.



That's pretty much the problem, the metal survives but I don't know of any examples where the grips have from this period (at least not in England, there are wooden handled examples from Gotland but, as far as I know, the wood has not been identified) I have heard of examples (but I've never seen any evidence!) with grips made from fossilised 'Oosik' (the baculum or 'penis bone' of a walrus or large seal) but these were from the far north (possibly Icelandic)

I think it depends on the type of wood used, and how dry it becomes, if the wood wasn't seasoned before being used then it may well have split as it dried out or split along the grain as a result of impacts recieved in sparring, I'd stay away from a softwood and put on grips from seasoned ash or something else native and tight grained then feed the wood with a little oil now and again. Nothing will last forever and a good full tang knife might well need grips replacing several times during it's life.


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thor-ingelri
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Re: lang sax? long sax? lang seax? long seax?

Postby thor-ingelri » Tue Jul 16, 2013 12:12 am

Hi, i have been for quite many reenacting with jomsviking group, and personally i think a good balenced longseax with type C pommel is the fastest striking weapon. Type C pommel helps your wrist bounce bach longseax to position ready to strike or defend again. A normal or unbalanced sword helps in strong blows but not in renacting or neither in ancient times when it was also enough to wound the enemy that would probably die soon after.



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kael
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Re: lang sax? long sax? lang seax? long seax?

Postby kael » Thu Jul 18, 2013 3:12 pm

Hi, i have been for quite many reenacting with jomsviking group, and personally i think a good balenced longseax with type C pommel is the fastest striking weapon. Type C pommel helps your wrist bounce bach longseax to position ready to strike or defend again. A normal or unbalanced sword helps in strong blows but not in renacting or neither in ancient times when it was also enough to wound the enemy that would probably die soon after.


Most swords found with Peterson Type C (and H) pommels are swords of Oakeshott Type X rather than the traditional Saxon 'langseax' (straight single edge). You might be thinking of the poorly labeled 'norwegian langseax' which represents a style of both single and double edged blades of the late 9th- early 10th century, like the Arhus Farm find, possibly inspired by eastern-european/steppe blades. The Saxon version is rather more distinct from an insular, continental inheritance.

Of course, these varied Norwegian swords tend to muddy the waters of what defines a 'langseax' in so far as noone can agree on what one is, especially given their Hunnish influence. As a rule though - at least according to Wheeler - the Saxon blades are almost universally flat straight edges coming to a point, Norse swords are hardly ever like this (at least in so far as archaeology allows!)

Image

EDIT - sorry just realised that the resurrection fairy has lifted this post from 2009...




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