An Interest in the true peoples of Great Britain

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Mark Briant
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Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2006 3:29 pm
Location: Lincolnshire, UK

An Interest in the true peoples of Great Britain

Postby Mark Briant » Mon Jul 03, 2006 3:40 pm

Over the last few years I have read many books while researching a book I one day plan to finish writing.

It stoked a keen interest in this country I call home. During my reading and in light of many claims of various cultures stating that THEY are the true people of these isles I have learned a little more of this land.

From what I understand the Celts are not native to these isles, but were just one of many invaders/settlers here. I believe that over the millenia the following people called this home:

3500BC Neolithic People (Original builders of Stonehenge?)
2000BC Beaker People (invaded and subjugated the Neolithic people, continuing and completing the work at Stonehenge).

This then led to further invasions by:
Celts
Romans
Saxons
Danes

each of which saw some part remain and mix with the existing people. Even today this rich traditional continues.

Can anybody confirm, clarify or add to this? These are only what I understand and am very interested in learning more.

Thanks in advance

Mark



guthrie
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Location: Polmont-Edinburgh

Postby guthrie » Wed Jul 12, 2006 11:19 pm

Just to confuse matters, I imagine that most of what you have been reading is based upon 30 year old and older evidence, not to mention some ridiculous extrapolation. Essentially, the modern view, based upon the past few decades of digging and dating and so on, is that in the UK, the Celts never really invaded in the old multiple waves manner. More that through trading, high level marriages, and the slow infiltration of some people, such as small family groups, the continental and British cultures came to resemble one another. Not that the locals were enslaved by invading Celtic hordes.

Plus, there is DAN evidence suggesting the origin of red hair amongst the NOrth west highlands, something like 4 or 5 thousand years ago, meaning that the locals up there havn't been signigficantly displaced by incomers.

Essentially, the first major invasion appears to have been the ROman one.
Bear in mind also that you can have many different cultures and one people, or many people from all over the place with one culture- culture is not genetic. You have to make that distinction- its one that many earlier researchers did not.


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AncientGardener
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Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2012 3:41 pm

Re:

Postby AncientGardener » Wed Oct 03, 2012 4:01 pm

guthrie wrote:Just to confuse matters, I imagine that most of what you have been reading is based upon 30 year old and older evidence, not to mention some ridiculous extrapolation. Essentially, the modern view, based upon the past few decades of digging and dating and so on, is that in the UK, the Celts never really invaded in the old multiple waves manner. More that through trading, high level marriages, and the slow infiltration of some people, such as small family groups, the continental and British cultures came to resemble one another. Not that the locals were enslaved by invading Celtic hordes.

Plus, there is DAN evidence suggesting the origin of red hair amongst the NOrth west highlands, something like 4 or 5 thousand years ago, meaning that the locals up there havn't been signigficantly displaced by incomers.

Essentially, the first major invasion appears to have been the ROman one.
Bear in mind also that you can have many different cultures and one people, or many people from all over the place with one culture- culture is not genetic. You have to make that distinction- its one that many earlier researchers did not.


I would add to this that even the Romans came in relatively small numbers and only replaced the leaders in the south of England but had less of an effect further north.
It's quite possible that the descendants of the people who were here then are still here now.

I've been doing similar research as I live in Wharfedale where there are many rock carvings from pre-historic times on the local moors (where I happen to walk my dog most days). As yet no-one knows just what is the significance of the carvings, some of which are quite beautiful. This site here as photo's of many of them. The Hangingstone carvings are some of my favourites.
I've even written a (fictional) book based on my findings about the same valley, but in the year 499BC. One of the intriguing things about this age is that there is almost zero written evidence, only carved rocks and earth structures remain. When writing a book this does give you room to invent/speculate a lot more about how people lived.



leedsbrew
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Joined: Fri Nov 09, 2012 10:13 pm

Re: An Interest in the true peoples of Great Britain

Postby leedsbrew » Fri Nov 09, 2012 10:16 pm

The stones on Ilkley Moore are wonderfull! I'm from Guiseley, so walk the dog up there a lot as well. We are very lucky to have such history on our doorstep! :D I can never help but wonder over to the badger stone and sit a while wondering about its creators! :D




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