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Iron Age pots

Posted: Thu May 28, 2015 6:47 pm
by KAY M
I'm trying to make some Iron Age replica pots; I was asked to do so by someone who kind of assumed that as I like history, and have made pots, and have a kiln, it would be easy peasy. But it isn't, really. Not if they are to be any good. Anyone got any hints or other light to shine on my darkness? :?

Re: Iron Age pots

Posted: Fri May 29, 2015 8:40 am
by sally
What specific examples are you basing yours on? I'm certainly no pottery expert but I seem to recall quite a wide variation in clay type, temper and form during the Iron Age. Getting the right grog/temper may well make all the difference, as much as whether you are building or throwing them

Re: Iron Age pots

Posted: Fri May 29, 2015 10:43 am
by KAY M
Good question; the Glastonbury Lake Village ones seem a good start; very high quality indeed. Crikey they were good at it.

As far as I can make out, they were not wheel thrown, although I have my nagging doubts, really, as inertia type wheels are not a big jump from milling techniques, and the shape of the better pots is accurate to a daunting level; to hand build that implies to me that some meaning of constantly turning, comparing, shaving would soon spring into the maker's mind.

We do not even know whether people slab built or coiled the Glastonbury pots; coiled seems most likely to modern me, but what would they roll the longer coils on....we have tables; we do not find broken flat stones in digs , do we? Or do we? And how would they keep the clay in good condition? In other lidded pots?

Any pointers, of any sort, are most welcome; frankly I am lost in indecision! :crazy:

Re: Iron Age pots

Posted: Sat May 30, 2015 10:02 am
by sally
Have you had a chat to any of the potters specialising in prehistoric stuff? Graham Taylor at Potted History is very friendly over on Twitter, might be worth seeing what he suggests

Re: Iron Age pots

Posted: Sun May 31, 2015 4:45 pm
by 40/- freeholder
Have you had a look at any of the work Ian Hodder did with indigenous potters in Africa? A lot of such ethnic wares are very similar to prehistoric European pottery so might be worth investigating their techniques.