Flint knappers

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MJ
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Flint knappers

Postby MJ » Sun Mar 26, 2006 8:37 pm

Any other flint knappers here? I've always wondered how far into the bronze (or even iron) age flint knapping extended?



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sally
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Postby sally » Sun Mar 26, 2006 10:38 pm

I've done a little, but can only really do fairly plain neolithic type blades. Have sat adoringly at the feet of John Lord a couple of times as he's magicked me up a complete flint toolset though 8) I love the way he can churn out flint sawblades and drillbits on demand, wish I was even a twentieth as good.



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MedicKitten
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Postby MedicKitten » Sun Mar 26, 2006 10:51 pm

I'm just a VERY VERY new beginner, as we are learning it in "Lithic Technology" class, but I know a few very good knappers from the Pequot tribe out here in the states. They're amazingly good at microlith production.


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m300572
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Postby m300572 » Mon Mar 27, 2006 5:12 pm

Flint was used into the Bronze Age, probably because it was cheap and easy to get hold of flint in a lot of the country (not all I know) as opposed to bronze. It was also used in the Iron Age - the shale bracelet indusrtry at Kimmeridge probably used flint rather than metal for roughing out shale bracelets on a lathe - again probably as it was cheaper and easier to use flint than to get iron tools which would wear out fairly fast.



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MJ
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Postby MJ » Mon Mar 27, 2006 7:49 pm

Thanks m300572, that's what I thought.

MedicKitten, keep at it! I think it's something that takes nearlya lifetime to become really proficient at. :lol:

sally, I've spent a total of 3 days with John Lord - fantastic guy, very skilled and a good laugh too. I've also spent a couple of hours with his son Will. I'm nowhere near as good as those two but - before the rain started - I did knap a small blade this weekend using my new antler hammer.



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David Freeman
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flint

Postby David Freeman » Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:14 pm

Flint flakes are found in ironage archaeology, but rarely as worked pieces in a deliberate shape. Sometimes you just need an instant edge, and a convenient flint to take a flake off is all you need.

We cannot even positively identify flakes that have been used for fire making!

David


The past is a foreign country.

Flintknapper
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Re: Flint knappers

Postby Flintknapper » Fri Apr 28, 2006 9:04 am

Hi

I am the PA to Karl Lee, one of the countries leading flintknappers with over 15 years experience of teaching, lectures, demonstrations and workshops.
Karl would like to know if there is anybody that is interested in learning how to flintknap. Please visit his website to see his work
Please see below for one of the many references for a workshop student.
I look forward to hearing from you.
Many Thanks

Rebecca

"I spent three very enjoyable days with Karl, during which time my flintknapping skills improved hugely. From the moment I stepped through the door, Karl made me feel very welcome in his home, and the tea's didn't stop flowing until I left (which is very important in my book)! Karl is not only a very relaxed, fun and patient guy, but clearly also has a very deep appreciation and understanding of the practical skills underpinning many prehistoric technologies. I was particularly encouraged by his unwavering positive attitude when it came to flintknapping - whenever my hand-eye coordination let me down Karl would get me thinking about the best way to work around the problem. I am really glad I spent the time to understand the practical side of prehistoric technology in more detail with Karl, and would highly recommend it to anyone who has an interest in ancient skills and crafts."
Nick Taylor – Workshop Student


Karl Lee
Flintknapper

m300572
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Postby m300572 » Fri Apr 28, 2006 12:07 pm

We cannot even positively identify flakes that have been used for fire making!


Would microwear analysis identify flakes used to cut the plastic baler string on the bundles of coppice wood do you think? Someone in the future will have a confusing job on the old demontration area at Butser! :lol:



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MedicKitten
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Postby MedicKitten » Fri Apr 28, 2006 3:35 pm

It would if molecules of baler twine were caught in the structure of your lithic artifact. We juuuuust finished a Use/Wear analysis project in my Lithics Class.


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saxon
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Re: flint

Postby saxon » Mon Aug 14, 2006 7:46 pm

David Freeman wrote:Flint flakes are found in ironage archaeology, but rarely as worked pieces in a deliberate shape. Sometimes you just need an instant edge, and a convenient flint to take a flake off is all you need.

We cannot even positively identify flakes that have been used for fire making!

David


I fully agree with that, many a time I've needed a 'razor sharp' edge to cut hide or something I've found it much easier to just knap a sliver of flint to use ............... many items - as previously said - show no signs of being knapped whatsoever, but this doesn't mean they weren't used in any way, personally I never throw away any decent shards or slivers of flint, they always have a use at some point.
From my own personal viewpoint I think flint would have been used not just for fire making but for various tasks a lot later than we tend to think it was.




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