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Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Tue Sep 10, 2013 1:22 pm
by Shortie
Hi all

I've recently bought a tin whistle as I've always wanted to learn how to play an instrument and want to be able to play at events.

It's in the key of D and I've learnt the basics of music reading.

I'm trying to find sheet music for some historical tunes. I've found a couple of websites but unfortunatley I haven't much idea of what to look for.

Can anyone recommend any catchy up beat tunes or have any sheet music they can point me towards?

I'm after historical music too, no modern songs.

I'd really appreciate advice on this please if anyone has any tips or advice for a whistle newbie.

Thanks

:$

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 4:32 pm
by Foxe
What period music are you looking for?

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Mon Sep 16, 2013 5:55 pm
by Shortie
To be honest....anything! I do however particularly like the sound of some of the napoleonic and civil war tunes, however they arent time periods i reenact. Ive been learning some irish tunes purely because thats whats in all tin whistle music books :)

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Wed Sep 18, 2013 8:55 pm
by Grania
I don't know if it's much help, but any Turlough O'Carolan (Carolan) tunes might be ok for you - he was around in the 17th/18th centuries and there are a huge number of tunes he is thought to have written. They are easy to get hold of, and although originally written for a harp should be quite easy to find in tune-only - being staples of Irish music.

I've one book of his tunes myself, written out for guitar, but I use it for my harp and have also used it for whistle.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/110-Irelands-Be ... olan+tunes

They are regularly played on a collection of instruments together, for example flute, guitar and harp, not just harp. One example http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpBejjhTi_I Eleanor Plunkett, a really pretty but quite simple tune by O'Carolan, also quite well known if you want to play with other musicians.

Another quite easily found traditional tune is 'Brian Boru's March' - I don't know how old it is, but it has been around for a very long time!

Hope that's of some interest :) Enjoy playing!

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:46 pm
by frances
Try this site:

http://www.folktunefinder.com/

You can search for all sorts of tunes here. Put in Napoleon or Waterloo for example.

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Tue Oct 01, 2013 6:43 pm
by Marcus Woodhouse
As the tin whistle has only been around since the 18th/19th century I cannot be thinking that the tune will be older than that.

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Tue Oct 15, 2013 5:52 pm
by Jack Campin
The tin whistle was invented in Birmingham in 1843, if I remember right.

There are much older tunes for six-hole flutes which are technically much the same as tin whistle music. My pages on Scottish flute music might be a start:

http://tinyurl.com/scottishflute

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Thu May 29, 2014 11:34 am
by bathfolkfest
Have you tried looking up tunes on www.thesession.org? It's a great source of traditional music. If you get chance come along to the Bath Folk Festival summer school in August (9th- 17th) too. The festival is organised by a brilliant tin whistle player who is really enthusiastic. The summer school runs from 11th -115th August and you get 3 hours of tuition per day plus sessions, recitals and workshops run by top class tutors.It's a grassroots festival which encourages participation. There are also lots of great gigs and traditional dancing etc. Have a look on the website www.bathfolkfestival.org for more details. Hope that helps.

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Thu May 29, 2014 10:49 pm
by Jack Campin
Brian Boru's March dates from the late 19th century. There is no known Irish music dating from before about 1580 and certainly nothing from Brian Boru's time.

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Fri May 30, 2014 12:27 am
by Lord Byron

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Wed Jun 18, 2014 7:17 pm
by FionaDowson
Dave Mallinson has produced some useful books with a CD - www.mally.com - of English folk tunes of unknown origin. Ancient Music make dark ages period instruments including a deer bone whistle.

Of-course, there's always the English Folk Dance and Song Society

Whistles are fun, once you get the hang of over blowing, pocket size and affordable

During the Napoleonic wars the three hole pipe and tabor was popular - the original one man band with the advantage that if you lost your right hand you could still busk on the street. There's an iconic woodcut of Will Kemp with his taborer dancing the Nine Days Wonder in 1600. Short tabor pipes are available fom Hobgoblin, I've only found long ones thru American sites like Susato, unless you can find someone who can turn you one. I believe there is a ta borers society who meet
on the net.
Most folk and morris tunes are in the key of D

What is referred to as a flute is often what we would call a whistle, of variable length. Apparently the favoured instrument of prostitutes in Ancient Greece.

Recorders were popular in Elizabethan England but I don;t know how old they actually are. The fingering for the low notes is the same fo a whistle as for a recorder, it's only the high notes that require recorder players to use a different set of fingering while we whistle players just blow a little harder

All in the best possible taste

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Thu Jun 19, 2014 12:29 am
by Jack Campin
The earliest surviving recorders (i.e. whistles using an octaving thumbhole) are from around 1400, found in Tartu, Estonia and Dordrecht, Holland. They probably date back a few decades before that, to somewhere around the Black Sea. The earliest ones are quite small.

Most folk and morris tunes are in the key of D


English folk tunes tend to use a range of an octave from D and are equally likely to be in D or G. Ditto Irish and Shetland tunes. Scottish ones (under Highland pipe influence) tend to use an octave from A and tend to be in D or A.

The fingering for the low notes is the same for a whistle as for a recorder, it's only the high notes that require recorder players to use a different set of fingering while we whistle players just blow a little harder


No - the differences are across the whole range. Recorders allow you to pitch chromatic notes by putting extra fingers down below the lowest open hole ("cross-fingering") which means playing in a wide range of keys is doable. Whistle players have to partly cover holes to get the same result, which you can't do as fast and stay in tune.

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 2:26 pm
by SteveC
FionaDowson wrote:During the Napoleonic wars the three hole pipe and tabor was popular - the original one man band with the advantage that if you lost your right hand you could still busk on the street. There's an iconic woodcut of Will Kemp with his taborer dancing the Nine Days Wonder in 1600. Short tabor pipes are available fom Hobgoblin, I've only found long ones thru American sites like Susato, unless you can find someone who can turn you one.

http://www.malvernminstrelsy.co.uk make very nice longer tabor pipes.
I believe there is a taborers society who meet on the net.

http://www.pipeandtabor.org

I have a very nice Malvern pipe, a modern 'Generation' pipe and two tabors, all being sadly neglected at the moment. :cry:

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Wed Jul 16, 2014 8:23 pm
by Pawel Brzosko
I used to play tin whistle while in an Irish group of XIV Century mercenaries (glaives!)

My absolutely top Tin Whistle based music was a band called Bran, but I need to check on some old tapes I have in the attic.
The tin whistle melodies were quite easy to learn from the tape.
Another one I remember was Open Folk, particularly Bretonstone album https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICpdPU87X-0

I frankly believe the best way to learn to play is copying by ear from the records. The simpler tunes for starters :)

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Thu Jul 17, 2014 7:01 am
by Pawel Brzosko
Got some more for you:

1) Bran - hungarian based Irish folk band. Their first album 'Immram - Journey' is goldmine for Tin Whistle melodies. I cannot find it anywhere on the web though. I can try digitalizing my old cassette and uploading to YT but it will take a while. http://www.bran.hu/bran/en/albums/immram

2) Carrantuohil - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXN87J4AMR0

3) Wedrowny Kopacz Torfu (wandering peat digger) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXfPmpKtkjY

Slainte!

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Thu Jul 17, 2014 10:18 pm
by Jack Campin
19th century Irish dance music is not mediaeval no matter who plays it.

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Fri Jun 26, 2015 10:35 pm
by frances
A bit late to the party - however I suggest that anyone starting to play the tin whistle should start with a tune that is already in your head. Something really simple. Learn to play that before going on to a strange tune that you do not yet know.

Re: Tin Whistle Music?

Posted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 8:41 pm
by FionaDowson
I think the taborers soc have a meeting of the sober and temperance society in Gloucester every year. Some people even attend in costume :)