This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

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Henri De Ceredigion
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This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby Henri De Ceredigion » Thu Dec 01, 2016 1:26 pm

But I am looking for a dance, from 1600 - 1650 ideally (later if needed) that can be done to a 3/4 time signature and a tempo of around 144 or so.



SteveC
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Re: This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby SteveC » Thu Dec 01, 2016 7:37 pm

You may be out of luck. The first three-time dances I can find instantly are minuets and they're a little late.
What's the tune? It might be possible to use it as a 6/8 jig.
Unfortunately our historical dance music expert isn't going to be at practice tonight (it's not a historical dance group, he just knows many things)



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Henri De Ceredigion
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Re: This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby Henri De Ceredigion » Thu Dec 01, 2016 9:03 pm

SteveC wrote:You may be out of luck. The first three-time dances I can find instantly are minuets and they're a little late. What's the tune? It might be possible to use it as a 6/8 jig. Unfortunately our historical dance music expert isn't going to be at practice tonight (it's not a historical dance group, he just knows many things)


There's no tune, I am just looking for a 17th century dance that can be danced to a 3/4 time signature. I will have a look at 6/8 jigs and see if they are suitable, but I was looking for something very nice and sedate



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Re: This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby SteveC » Thu Dec 01, 2016 11:52 pm

I've emailed a friend about this and she suggested 'Jenny Pluck Pears' from Playford as being the only 3/4 tune (and it's only the second part) she knew.
It's a nice dance and might be worth a look.

http://round.soc.srcf.net/dances/cdb/cdb2/jpp



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Henri De Ceredigion
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Re: This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby Henri De Ceredigion » Fri Dec 02, 2016 12:38 am

SteveC wrote:I've emailed a friend about this and she suggested 'Jenny Pluck Pears' from Playford as being the only 3/4 tune (and it's only the second part) she knew.
It's a nice dance and might be worth a look.

http://round.soc.srcf.net/dances/cdb/cdb2/jpp


That looks perfect, thank you very much indeed




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Jack Campin
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Re: This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby Jack Campin » Fri Dec 02, 2016 3:28 am

A galliard is usually thought of as 6/8, but wouldn't that do?



Merrie Noyse
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Re: This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby Merrie Noyse » Thu Feb 02, 2017 10:40 pm

Hi Jenny Pluck Pairs is mainly in compound time. Try the tune Daphnie, also part of the first Playford collection. Cheers Baz



de Coverley
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Re: This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby de Coverley » Fri Feb 17, 2017 12:55 am

John Playford's English Dancing Master, which started in 1651 (tho some say 1650) and ran as a series until about 1720, is available in facsimile and modern type face many times on the www, complete with music.
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/playford_1651/
Mr Playford was a compiler, editor and publisher, his books were sold to the travelling dancing masters of the day. Some of the dances are "event specials" for maybe a wedding or ball and others were just generally popular. Some have survived in practise many have not. Cecil Sharp in the early 20thc edited these works into more danceable dances, maybe with a different tune from the repertoire.

Between the Monarchs, there was a puritan period from when dancing instruction manuals certainly haven't survived -likely were not published or printed.

Sir Roger de Coverley can (should?) be danced to slip jigs in 9/8 so may fit your wish for a dance in triple time
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTjgA5GFPCI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjwrSy_YI2Q
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iye3JoD5LUo -this fits triple time



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Jack Campin
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Re: This may be a little off topic as it deals with dancing

Postby Jack Campin » Fri Feb 24, 2017 2:18 am

Between the Monarchs, there was a puritan period from when dancing instruction manuals certainly haven't survived -likely were not published or printed.


Nonsense. The first three editions of Playford were all published under the Commonwealth. So was the first edition of Playford's "An Introduction to the Skill of Musick".

There wasn't a major dance music publishing scene under Charles I to interrupt. It only got started under Cromwell.




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