WLTB medieval chair / stool

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simonw
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WLTB medieval chair / stool

Postby simonw » Sun Dec 18, 2016 11:37 pm

Am interested in a chair or stool C13/14.



mikale
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Re: WLTB medieval chair / stool

Postby mikale » Wed Jan 25, 2017 4:41 pm

Have you looked on quiverstock, the campaign chair they make is really comfortable and folds away nicely too.



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PaulMurphy
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Re: WLTB medieval chair / stool

Postby PaulMurphy » Wed Jan 25, 2017 11:03 pm

Quiverstock's chair is simple, elegant, and wrong for C13/14. There are curule chairs or stools from the Roman period, but the folding X-chairs with arms and back seem to appear first in Renaissance Italy, maybe from about 1500 onwards. Until then, chairs seem to have been rare and used by Kings and Bishops only, and reflect their wealth and place of power by being significantly heavy and elaborate. Have a look at the Throne of Dagobert - https://www.wdl.org/en/item/641/ - and consider the weight of this. The coronation chair in Westminster Abbey wasn't heavy enough on its own when made out of oak, so they stuck the Stone of Destiny into it. Portable they are not...

If you find some documentation to show chairs in general use in the C14th, or indeed evidence on which to base a sound reproduction stool, there are a lot of people who would be very interested to see it.


Paul Murphy
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Brother Ranulf
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Re: WLTB medieval chair / stool

Postby Brother Ranulf » Sat Jan 28, 2017 9:52 am

Furniture at that time was associated with (a) social class and (b) with a dwelling, specifically the dwelling of someone of means.

The tax returns of 1294 and 1301 from Colchester showed that the most prosperous townsmen had no more than a bed or two and that many persons had nothing that a tax collector found worth recording. Note that "bed" refers mainly to its mattress and covers, the frame usually being of little value.

John of Garland, an eminent English scholar living and teaching in France at the beginning of the thirteenth century, listed the necessary furnishings of an honest man's house in his Vocabulary, probably written between 1218 and 1229. He specified: "a decent table, a clean cloth, hemmed towels, high tripods, strong trestles, firebrands, fuel, logs, stakes, bars, benches, forms, armchairs, wooden frames and chairs made to fold, quilts, bolsters, and cushions." An "honest man" at that time referred to someone considered respectable, someone highly regarded and therefore of considerable monetary worth and status (think wealthy merchant or an important burgess or a nobleman serving in some civilian capacity). "Chairs made to fold" is a very interesting reference, but there is little or no evidence for the construction or appearance of such items.

The Church is a special case and apart from the cathedra (thrones) of bishops - from which the word cathedral derives - there was a chair (only one) in every church for the use of the priest (see Neckham: De Nominibus Utensilium on the contents of a church); monastic scribes each had a chair and desk partitioned from its neighbours. Otherwise monks sat on stone benches in the Chapter House and wooden benches in the refectory at meals.

In Church schools and universities, a master sat on a chair while students sat on the floor; a "leech" or surgeon had a chair while his patient stood, lay down or sat on a low stool before him (see Chirurgia in over 20 manuscript copies, including MS O.1.20 Trinity College, Cambridge dating to the first half of the 13th century).

So chairs definitely extended beyond kings and bishops, but they were restricted to a small number of high-status people - and scribes.


Brother Ranulf

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PaulMurphy
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Re: WLTB medieval chair / stool

Postby PaulMurphy » Sat Jan 28, 2017 2:44 pm

So chairs definitely extended beyond kings and bishops


In buildings, yes. As a portable item to be used on campaign or carted around (literally) wherever you went, no.


Paul Murphy

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simonw
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Re: WLTB medieval chair / stool

Postby simonw » Mon Jan 30, 2017 8:39 pm

Ah well, glad I've facilitated a history lesson, but I've still not got anything to sit on....



bunny2001
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Re: WLTB medieval chair / stool

Postby bunny2001 » Mon Feb 06, 2017 12:48 am

Try Steven Payne ' The peddler' at gigs or at History fares .



Annie the Arrow
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Re: WLTB medieval chair / stool

Postby Annie the Arrow » Mon Feb 06, 2017 10:08 pm

Try Douggie the Wood when he is back from New Zealand


"For he(the bow), any old stick will do. But arrow will get deer”.
Ishi, last of the Yaqui Amerindians of California

Boga Sceal Strale
A Bow Shall Be For Arrows


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