Head dress

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sara1459
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Head dress

Postby sara1459 » Fri Oct 28, 2005 7:22 pm

Hi

This is my first time at using this site so please excuse any mistakes.
I am looking for a head dress which would have been worn by a fairly middle class lady in 15th century.

I know you can wear a coif however I think they are a bit plain and I am sure that the medieval women even if married women would have had something slightly more flattering. They seemed to love colour - I am sure this would have reflected in their head gear

Any suggestions ?

Many thanks

Sara :lol:



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Uncle Bulgaria
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Postby Uncle Bulgaria » Mon Oct 31, 2005 10:42 am

There are loats of diffierent head gear available within the 15th century.

The most versitile being the square of linen! Sounds odd but with a simple square of linen you can produce many varying forms form of headdress, not just the one that makes you look like a washer woman.

Other designs are the rabbit hat, swallow tail, Gonelle and Henin but depending on what you do the Henin may be at little upper class.

I've see illustration of hats in varying colour but be aware of the source (i.e continental etc).

If you haven't already bpought at the market, let me know and I will give you a name of a supplier of hats who I think may be able to help.



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Lady Winchester
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Postby Lady Winchester » Thu Nov 03, 2005 10:48 pm

hi check out kats hats, she makes wonderful hed wear and accessories!
Karen


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Postby frances » Sun Nov 20, 2005 1:28 am

As for veils, I have some very fine woven silk, virtually transparent, in cream. Some has a metallic gold woven edge about 1" (2.5cms for the youngsters) and is quite wide. I have enough for myself (must make a headdress by Xmas for a historic dance party) and to pass on to others who are fine rich ladies. pm me for details.



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mally ley
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Postby mally ley » Sun Nov 20, 2005 11:10 am

Sarah - as in most things costume related this does depend on your social status :roll:
The linen part of the head dress was, AFAIK, always white - interest added with another layer.
I suppose the linen part, closest to the hair, got dirtiest and needed to be easiest to wash - like the rest of the clothes. If you couldn't afford more than one 'hat' it would be kept grease free by the coif under it.
Is the linen coif the head equivalent of the kirtle :?: something you always wore around the house, but then added to/covered when you went out, like putting on a gown :?:



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Postby craig1459 » Sun Nov 20, 2005 11:22 am

mally ley wrote:Sarah - as in most things costume related this does depend on your social status :roll:


Sara - I think this basically means that the only way you can wear a fancy head-dress is to let me buy more armour!


die Behmen hinder iren bafosen ... stunden vest wie die mauren

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Postby mally ley » Sun Nov 20, 2005 12:08 pm

craig1459 wrote:Sara - I think this basically means that the only way you can wear a fancy head-dress is to let me buy more armour!

Tsk, always trying to turn everything to their advantage . . . :roll:



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Postby frances » Mon Nov 21, 2005 12:12 am

Social status, yes. But also the weather and what you were dressing for. If you had a respected visitor in your home you would dress up more, and if it were cold you put on more layers. If you were working in the fields you would not put on your Sunday best, which you would do if you were getting married. Also your job. The wife of a cloth merchant or tailor would dress to a higher level than some other artisans because you had access to the necessary. A minstrel working for a titled family would dress to a higher level than a minstrel who wandered from town to town getting work wherever he (and family) could. So it is never as simple as it seems at first, is it. You could have found a clothing item along the path, or you or friend/relative could have stolen it. That is why they kept enacting those sumptuary laws - they just did not work.



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Lady Pink
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Postby Lady Pink » Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:07 am

Hi Sara,
Kats Hats highly recomended, does wonderful headresses if you want to know how to get hold of her email me.


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Postby Tuppence » Wed Nov 23, 2005 1:39 am

depending on which bit of the century you're in, and whereabouts you are, it could range from the basic coif or caul - through the demure veils and wimple (still being worn right through the century right into the sixteenth), variations on the horned headdress (horns of varying size, and still around in 1480s (ms-bm), the henin - truncated ones only if english - big pointy ones were pretty much exclusive to the continent - but still of varying length from the back of the head - and the butterfly headdress, which is basically a henin with wires standing out at the back, with a veil over them.

then of course there are hoods of various types.

with regard to social status, the most important thing for a re-enactor is to make sure that it matches all your other kit, more or less. (eg - rough woollen frock with silk hat ain't gonna work at any date - unless you're being a thief or some other disreputable, in which case fine (like frances says - never that simple!))


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Postby craig1459 » Sat Feb 04, 2006 9:18 pm

Bounce


die Behmen hinder iren bafosen ... stunden vest wie die mauren

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Postby Annis » Sat Feb 04, 2006 9:45 pm

Did unmarried/betrothed women have to wear headdresses?

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Postby Skevmeister » Mon Feb 06, 2006 8:00 pm

craig1459 wrote:
mally ley wrote:Sarah - as in most things costume related this does depend on your social status :roll:


Sara - I think this basically means that the only way you can wear a fancy head-dress is to let me buy more armour!


Hey good argument mate,


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headgear

Postby MedicKitten » Mon Feb 06, 2006 9:16 pm

The advantage of wearing WHITE as the foundation for almost all headcoverings is that its easier to clean and is colorfast. Many dyes in the medieval period were not color-stable, and faded rather quickly. Since head-coverings were presumably washed with the other underlinens, it would make sense to keep them in a sensible plain white. What, after all, is the use of using dyed fabric on a garment that is supposed to bleach in the sun for cleanliness?

(i like clean clothes) :-p


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How to make a head-dress

Postby frances » Tue Feb 07, 2006 12:44 am

I have offered to do costume practical workshops at David Smith's Living History Fairs. One of the topics I have offered him was how to make head-dresses. Not how to fold a veil-style one, or how to make a fabric coif, but how to make the fairly permanent 'silly hat' styles. This will cover the techniques and materials and tools needed. In an hour or so I cannot cover much more than that.

I do realise that this might be felt to be treading on other people's toes, but whatever topic I do will have the same result - some maker may think I am spoiling their trade. If I cover 'how to bone your costume and your corset' or 'how to upgrade your outfit' or 'how to make a mask' or any other practical but not easy costume-related subject, there may be people who may think I should not do that topic.

So can I test the waters here. What do you think about me demonstrating to people how to make small items of costume at the fairs. There will be a small additional cost to cover my time and materials, and if I put a pack of instructions and/or guide materials together, I will have to charge for these also. I imagine there will be an hour or so's slot between the handbaggery and the full-contact pointy metal stuff. Should I do the same workshop every day or a different one each day? One or two per day?



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Postby Tuppence » Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:42 am

Well I for one Frances, don't have a problem with *anybody* doing courses. (OK I don't trade at the ORM, not the NLHF, but I'm still a costumer :D ). And I give enough advice to anyone making their own kit that I'd be a hypocrite if I did.

Karen - lovely long list of pictures - do you have any more definite dates on them? Some of them look alot more early fifteenth century than WOTR to me (but could just be me being more familiar with British pics than European ones :D ).

Debs
Last edited by Tuppence on Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:43 am, edited 1 time in total.


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Postby Tuppence » Wed Feb 08, 2006 12:42 am

Well I for one Frances, don't have a problem with *anybody* doing courses. (OK I don't trade at the ORM, not the NLHF, but I'm still a costumer :D ). And I give enough advice to anyone making their own kit that I'd be a hypocrite if I did.

Karen - lovely long list of pictures - do you have any more definite dates on them? Some of them look alot more early fifteenth century than WOTR to me (but could just be me being more familiar with British pics than European ones :D ).

Debs


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Postby Karen Larsdatter » Wed Feb 08, 2006 5:13 pm

Tuppence wrote:Karen - lovely long list of pictures - do you have any more definite dates on them? Some of them look alot more early fifteenth century than WOTR to me (but could just be me being more familiar with British pics than European ones :D ).

Sorry; really ought to have done the whole title/date/folio thing, etc. :) Well -- here's the illustrations I've got dates for ...

1410
http://classes.bnf.fr/ema/grands/360.htm

c. 1412-1416
http://humanities.uchicago.edu/images/h ... bruary.jpg
http://humanities.uchicago.edu/images/heures/july.jpg
http://humanities.uchicago.edu/images/h ... tember.jpg

1432
http://expositions.bnf.fr/gastro/grands/136.htm
http://expositions.bnf.fr/gastro/grands/117.htm
http://expositions.bnf.fr/gastro/grands/113.htm
http://expositions.bnf.fr/gastro/grands/104.htm
http://expositions.bnf.fr/gastro/grands/118.htm

Late 15th century (before 1496)
http://www.medievalbeads.com/docs/items ... -tree.html
http://www.columbia.edu/itc/barnard/the ... s/1496.htm

The rest of the open hoods are just dated "15th century" on the various sites from whence they came.



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Tuppence
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Postby Tuppence » Thu Feb 09, 2006 2:21 am

Thanks loads (just couldn't work out how to get back to a page on the site that might have had the dates on them (probably too many paint fumes!!).


"What a lovely hat! But may I make one teensy suggestion? If it blows off, don't chase it."

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