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Posted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 7:09 pm
by MedicKitten
hairs showing through sheer hose puts the maidens off.
I can think of ONE older man for whom its not the HAIRS that scare me...though at 22 I think I too am too old :twisted:

Posted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 7:41 pm
by Tamsin Lewis
though at 22 I think I too am too old
You probably are...

Posted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 7:49 pm
by MedicKitten
strangely, that's comforting to know!

Posted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 8:40 pm
by Karen Larsdatter
Shadowcat wrote:There is a painting of a "Virgin" knitting on four needles, from, I think, the 14th century.
I think the one you mean is at http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Studios/1940/medknit.html and/or http://groups.yahoo.com/group/HistoricKnit/ ? (The first link, I think, is a redrawing of the picture on the second link, but I'm not sure.)

My friend Stephanie says that this is meant to depict the Virgin knitting the garment without seams described in John 19:23, and may not reflect a knitting technique or garment that would have been common in the Middle Ages.

Posted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:09 pm
by Shadowcat
That's the one. I don't know what the information in Richard Rutt's book on knitting

http://www.woolery.com/Pages/coversknit ... dknit.html

says about this period of knitting. If anyone has one it might be worth checking it out, as it was THE book on knitting fairly recently.

The interesting thing to me is not what she is knitting so much as that the technique of knitting on four needles was known and used at this time.

S.

Posted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 10:45 pm
by Jenn
It was one of the few things that made me feel better about getting older was the day that I grew too old for him to be interested any more

Posted: Thu Mar 22, 2007 10:49 pm
by sally
Shadowcat wrote:That's the one. I don't know what the information in Richard Rutt's book on knitting

http://www.woolery.com/Pages/coversknit ... dknit.html

says about this period of knitting. If anyone has one it might be worth checking it out, as it was THE book on knitting fairly recently.

The interesting thing to me is not what she is knitting so much as that the technique of knitting on four needles was known and used at this time.

S.
There is a surprising amount of evidence for medieval knitting, its just getting it all to join up into a coherent understanding of exactly what was being knitted and what wasnt that is the current issue. Fortunately there are a few people out there pulling it all together a little bit at a time, and its quite fascinating to see the bits in the Museum of London for example that have survived

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 5:07 pm
by sally
Ok, finally some pics
Here are stockings in double thickness (the dark red) and single thickness (the blue) and close ups of the mesh. These proved quite hard to photograph, plus the funny plastic legs have much smaller feet than these hose so its not a perfect pic, but hopefully gives a bit of an indication of how they look :D

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 5:34 pm
by myladyswardrobe
Squeeeeeee!!!! They look great!! The single thickness does look tighter.

Now, I wonder who those ones are for??? :wink:

Gorgeous colours.

Regards

Bess.

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 6:11 pm
by sally
myladyswardrobe wrote: Now, I wonder who those ones are for??? :wink:
I wonder indeed :wink:

Pictures

Posted: Thu Mar 29, 2007 12:51 pm
by Dathi
Pretty.......I may have to dribble.......The red are scrummy.....

Posted: Tue Apr 10, 2007 6:51 pm
by sally
Just to get the juices flowing for those that already like the current silk stockings, those were knitted on a machine that uses 84 needles, and I've just been offered a similar machine (same make and vintage actually) but with- wait for it- a 108 needle cylinder as well as the 84 like mine! Thats potentially going to mean a much tighter knit in the fine silk and a wider range of possible leg sizes. Its a big investment and it may be some months before I can get to it (its right on the other side of the country) but it should mean I can make even slinkier stockings for you all for next year. But it doesnt stop there, the 'new' machine even has a cylinder small enough to do childrens stockings and socks as well. With multiple cylinders I may even be able to hazard some of those lovely ludicrous bucket top stockings without breaking anyones bank balance. I'm soooo excited. Just need to do a small bank robbery or two and plan a short holiday hop to collect it :D :D :D

Posted: Tue Apr 10, 2007 9:19 pm
by myladyswardrobe
Oooh! The latest machine sounds fantastic!! Count me in for another pair or two when you can get the machine.

Where in the country is it? I know you are in Wales (oddly enough not terribly far from where I lived the first 20 years of my life) so the other side of the country would be East Anglia (hazarding a guess there!).

Bess.

Boot Hose

Posted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 2:11 pm
by Dathi
Sally

I guess then you're seen item number T.63&AA-1910 in the V&A ?

Re: Boot Hose

Posted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 3:14 pm
by sally
Dathi wrote:Sally

I guess then you're seen item number T.63&AA-1910 in the V&A ?
Which ones were they, I know they have several pairs of stockings, just couldnt get that number to bring anything up when I did a search just now

Re: Boot Hose

Posted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 4:24 pm
by Karen Larsdatter
Dathi wrote:Sally

I guess then you're seen item number T.63&AA-1910 in the V&A ?
Do you mean T.63&A-1910 maybe?

Posted: Tue Apr 17, 2007 4:53 pm
by sally
Those were the very pair I had in mind, wouldnt they be fun :D

Boot hose

Posted: Wed Apr 18, 2007 12:23 pm
by Dathi
sally wrote:Those were the very pair I had in mind, wouldnt they be fun :D
That must count as teasing......

Oooh... before I forget. Worsted stockings.....a 1590's source covering clothing issued to Officers and soldiers in Ireland and the Low countries. I'm right in guessing they're cloth hose?

Re: Boot hose

Posted: Wed Apr 18, 2007 12:50 pm
by sally
Dathi wrote:
sally wrote:Those were the very pair I had in mind, wouldnt they be fun :D
That must count as teasing......

Oooh... before I forget. Worsted stockings.....a 1590's source covering clothing issued to Officers and soldiers in Ireland and the Low countries. I'm right in guessing they're cloth hose?
I should think cloth hose too, though knitted are widespread by that time, the worsted does suggest cloth to me