Wanted patterns for ladies costumes for War of the Roses

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sisterwulfe69*
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Wanted patterns for ladies costumes for War of the Roses

Post by sisterwulfe69* »

Hi Guys,
Can you help me out I've just enrolled in the Savile Household and am needing help with patterns for ladies costumes for War of the Roses. I have shoes on order, so I'm ok for them and hose I can also get no probs
too.
Would be grateful if anyone replies cheers!!!!! :D

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craig1459
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Post by craig1459 »

Hi
You're a bit far to be a Savile :lol:

For a start the Rices have an encyclopedic knowledge of clothing but I believe they may have left now. But Vanessa is also first class

The Medieval Tailor's Assistant by Sarah Thursfield is a great start for all kit.

Buckingham's Retinue website also has some good kit guidelines
http://www.bucks-retinue.org.uk/content/view/217/270/

Craig
(ex-Savile)
die Behmen hinder iren bafosen ... stunden vest wie die mauren

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Sophia
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Post by Sophia »

Welcome on board :D

If you are intending to make your own clothes then I would strongly suggest that you acquire a copy of The Medieval Tailor's Assistant by Sarah Thursfield. This provides instructions on creating a basic body block and personalised patterns for the whole range of medieval garments for men and women from the skin out. I have not yet come across a stock pattern for C15th that I would recommend unless you are an absolute stock size or are skilled at altering patterns.

You could if you are a fairly standard size purchase basic ready made garments, Cloaked and Dagged(Jackie Phillips on this forum) and Sally Green spring to mind as reliable suppliers.

There may also be someone in the Savilles who might be able to assist you creating a pattern.

Alternatively you could commission made to measure garments - pricier but should guarantee a better level of authenticity. Quality suppliers who spring to mind are Jackie again and Tuppence who also posts here. One thing to bear in mind is that made to measure generally has a lead time of a couple of months and people may well have fullish order books by now.

Whichever route you choose, do not be discouraged. Many people have started out with no sewing skills at all and have progressed to very high levels of skill.

Sophia :D

P.S. I also do entirely hand sewn or hand finished body linens for both men and women - feel free to contact me :D

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sisterwulfe69*
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Post by sisterwulfe69* »

Thanks guys will look into it :D

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sisterwulfe69*
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Post by sisterwulfe69* »

managed to get patterns from Dave Rushworth
I've a feeling we're not in Kansas any more Toto

katiepoppycat
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Post by katiepoppycat »

try sally pointers kirtle pattern - i've extolled the virtues of this pattern on here somewhere else already. It's so very easy for a complete beginner and you can use it to make a smock too - cut the neckline a bit lower and sew up all the seams instead of putting eyelets in it!

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Alice the Huswyf
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Post by Alice the Huswyf »

Sally's pattern is excellent - and the instructions are very clear, but that is a C14th kirtle.

By the late C15th shaping by the insertion of skirt gores in kirtle had gone out, as you see the bodice and skirt cut in one as shaped pieces, rather than working on adapting cloth in the strip with remnant additions and relatively minor shaping subtractions to the edges.

This continued until the introduction of the transition tudor gowns and kirtles, when bodices were multiply pieced, and cut separately from the skirt.

I would suggest you make a toile (practice garment in bed sheeting or scrap cloth) from Sally's pattern. Once put together and fitted, take it all apart (but leaving the gores attached to the skirt panels to increase the skirt piece width) and then use it as a base pattern for an ungored 4 panel kirtle, which be fine for lower status WOTR.

It is also an starter point for smocks, but smocks were cut on the fold at the shoulders (which removes the need to make a shoulder seam) and on the fold at the centre front and centre back (which removes the need for two more main seams). I find it fascinating that fashion often follows use, need or convenience over and over again, aga after age in this or similar ways.

Alternatively, you could buy her little book on making period underwear...... insert detailed plug here, Sally!

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Karen Larsdatter
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Post by Karen Larsdatter »

There's a new late 15th century women's kirtle pattern that Reconstructing History put out last autumn, too -- I've got that one at home, just haven't gotten around to sewing it up yet, but it looks pretty easy to do. :)

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