Looking for patterens for late 1400's trews

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gallowglass
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Looking for patterens for late 1400's trews

Post by gallowglass »

Any idea on where I can find the above please????
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Tuppence
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Post by Tuppence »

specifially, what do you mean by the term "trews"?

debbie

(Not being picky, s'just so I avoid directing you to completely the wrong thing).
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Tod
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Post by Tod »

I assume you mean Scots trews or the Irish ones.
Try posting on the Sealed Knot site. There are some Gungiven trews that may be correct (not sure if that is the correct spelling.

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Andy R
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Post by Andy R »

The Dungiven trews are from the 1600's.

Trews were the natural evolution of your older hose, so for the 1400's look for info on c15th hose and you should be prety much on target.


BR
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Tuppence
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Post by Tuppence »

I've always considered the term 'trews' to refer to later 'trouser type garments' (c.16th - 19th C, eg the dungiven, the cotton trew, etc etc), rather than something medieval, which is why I asked for more info.

But it struck me that you might be looking for medieval "trousers", which were worn in the further reaches of Europe, insted of hosen (meaning Ireland, northern Scotland, Scandinavia) and by the peasant classes in the more central areas (England, France, Germany, The Low Countries, etc).

If you are looking for medieval trousers (rather than hosen), stay away from the hose patterns, because they're completely different in cut and construction.
Trews were the natural evolution of your older hose
Sorry, but they're not as it happens (though that's the natural assumption, and one made by costume historians for years).

Till Janet Arnold and a couple of others got involved. The cut is actually more likely to be a combination of the split hosen (meaning single legged of the early medieval type) that were still worn in some parts, and the 'trousers' that were worn in others.

If you look at what's known about trews, and compare it to what's known about hosen, the cut of the two bears hardly any resemblence, although looking at a pair of each made up, you could barely tell.

I'm not sure that there is a medieval trousers pattern anywhere, but I'll have a think.

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Andy R
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Post by Andy R »

Yes, the Dungiven trews especially as the pattern was designed for single elle (sp?) width cloth if I get my pattern right.

There are a few patterns for good c17th trews that come from original remnants.

You will have to excuse my absolute ignorance on the finer points (any point) of earlier hose :D
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

http://www.16ld.org

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Sledge
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Post by Sledge »

Dungiven trews can be found on the Reconstructing History web site - Kass McGann has got a great pattern for these.

The pattern in the Medieval Tailors Asst is a good one - which I have used for many years. I have got diagrams etc in a Word doc. - if you want to PM me with your email address I'll send them to you.
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Post by gallowglass »

I'm actually looking for both English and Irish. The English ones would have to be late 15thCentury.
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Post by Nigel »

So for English read hose a completely differant garment to Trews.

And you ahve been shown were to go for the pattern for those
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