Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Making, Pictures, Queries, Resources

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
steve stanley
Post Knight
Posts: 1122
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 6:07 pm
Location: Leicester

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby steve stanley » Mon Jul 19, 2010 3:26 pm

Whether fighting.talking to the public,or swinging a sickle,surely getting the material culture right should be the basis of all re-enactment?.....Admitted,if I walked into a 1750's town,the moment I opened my mouth or tried to do anything practical it'd be obvious I weren't from around them parts.......But getting your clothes & kit right from your own reasoned research is such a basic thing to me,I never fail to be amazed at those who don't do it............I recall a coversation with a 25-year plus re-enacator,who just didn't get my moaning about traders shirts being too short....His response?..'well,the public don't know'............
Steve(who's been off-line for a while & could do with a good arguement!)


"Give me a tent and a kettle
Snowshoes and axe and gun
Send me up in Grand River
Steering by star and sun".
- Labrador Trapper's Song

User avatar
Foxe
Post Centurion
Posts: 759
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 9:46 pm
Location: Defending Devon from French invasion
Contact:

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby Foxe » Mon Jul 19, 2010 7:40 pm

WARNING! RAMBLING WAFFLE APPROACHING.

I, like Steve, and many other reenactors of my acquaintance, put a lot of effort into "getting it right". For any chosen portrayal I will gather as many contemporary pictures, and as much written evidence as possible. I will seek out archaeological reports for material culture, look for period stuff in museums. I make almost all my own soft kit myself because that way I know it's right (or as right as I can make it), and either make myself or commission much of the hard kit for the same reason. When I go to events by myself I try not to take anything out of period out of the car - frequently, I don't even sleep in a tent.

I have, in the past, been quietly smug about myself.

Then a couple of years back I had an epiphany.

I was in an "English" bar in the States on Burns' Night. Now, I'm as English as they come, but I've got Scottish friends and have been to Burns' Night celebrations, so I have an idea what they're like. These Caledamericans were having a great time, but it was nothing like a "real" Burns' Night. The costumes were ok, the men wore skirts, the music was mostly Scottish, and they even ate instestines - but it was nothing like my previous experiences of the celebration. It was, I said to my companions at the time, as though they had read about Burns' Night in a book. And then it struck me, that in their own way, they were reenactors.

It doesn't matter how close we get to what's written in the book. There are so many things that we know we do wrong, what about the stuff we think we do "right"? Have we got it right, or have we just missed the point entirely like the Jockyanks?

Of course, none of this will stop me doing the best I can anyway...


...and further this Informant saith not.

Foxe

'Don't be fooled by his general air of living in a skip'

http://www.etfox.co.uk

User avatar
Brian la Zouche
Posts: 426
Joined: Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:07 am
Location: Ashby dela Zouch, Leics
Contact:

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby Brian la Zouche » Tue Jul 20, 2010 9:37 am

im guessin the armericans really enoyed it tho ??

dont get me wrong im all for getting as authentic as i can with information available to me,

but if i wear a ''hello kitty'' ( i dont tho before you ask ) under clothing that there is no chance of it ever being seen or affecting clothing worn on top of it.. how bad is that really ?? sure its not authentic but if you have authentic clothing on top................

bad ???

ok how about tattoos ? I have some on my left arm, chest and hand, all these are COMPLETELY covered with clothing , my hand in ACW 7th Va cav i used to wear gauntlets which covered these, in medieval i shall cover with linen wrap to portray an injury,

doesnt it boil down to what is actually seen, how far do you go ? do you not have fillings in teeth then ?? i see so many with the little add on heels for periods that would not have had them. and they are allowed ( by some not all societys i may add ) quote ''well no one sees them'', machine stitching on parts never seen are also allowed by some, brass belt fitting where bronze would have been used, the list of compromises are endless (although i do not include the Living history exhibitors in this as the vast majority, will make even greather efforts to authenticity)
material is burnt on a regualr basis to see the % of pure. if you can not tell by looking and feeling, couldnt that be sometimes coincidered to be over the top. (yes i know the fire safety aspect of modern artifical textiles, and I do understand its a good way to make sure you are in fact paying for pure wool etc, and not being charged pure price for a cheaper mixture)

i am only really looking at this from the view of the ''general'' public, for reenactment battles,
if it looks like a hog, smells like a hog, sounds like a hog, and its in a sty, most people will accept it a hog, or do we need to run genetic structure tests ??

myself i want to look and act as authentic with the information thats available to me

im not going to take out my fillings to show the public ''look how authentic i am '', i do firmly believe there should be a minimum standard with the information thats available for your chosen period,

so re the post question ''Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?'' i say yes......but to each persons own veiw point
Last edited by Brian la Zouche on Tue Jul 20, 2010 1:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.


"I don't know what you're doing with that bowling ball, girly. But I'm not gonna stand by and let a lady do a man's job."

Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Tue Jul 20, 2010 11:17 am

For someone new to the hobbey that's quite an astute posting.


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

User avatar
Brian la Zouche
Posts: 426
Joined: Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:07 am
Location: Ashby dela Zouch, Leics
Contact:

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby Brian la Zouche » Tue Jul 20, 2010 12:01 pm

Ah I'm new to the medieval period, and I openely admit i know nothing as to authenticity of my chosen period, but I was bitten by the reenactment bug and took part in my first battle (A.C.W) 30 years ago. although I have not been active for the last 5 years, other than attending shows as mop.


"I don't know what you're doing with that bowling ball, girly. But I'm not gonna stand by and let a lady do a man's job."

Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Tue Jul 20, 2010 8:28 pm

See I knew it you sly old fox.


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

User avatar
gregory23b
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2923
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 9:46 pm
Location: Gyppeswyk, Suffolk

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby gregory23b » Wed Jul 21, 2010 1:14 pm

It is about a look or an impression, not 'living the life'.


middle english dictionary

Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

"I know my place." Alice the Huswyf

User avatar
Brian la Zouche
Posts: 426
Joined: Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:07 am
Location: Ashby dela Zouch, Leics
Contact:

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby Brian la Zouche » Wed Jul 21, 2010 5:09 pm

yeah that works for me


"I don't know what you're doing with that bowling ball, girly. But I'm not gonna stand by and let a lady do a man's job."

User avatar
nutmeg_bec
Posts: 58
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2005 11:03 pm
Location: London

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby nutmeg_bec » Fri Aug 27, 2010 7:43 pm

I'm trying desperately to remember the name of the LH museum in America which has just the kind of portrayal many here seem to envisage: Imagine wandering to the edge of the town, onto the farm. As a member of the public you can see a man accross the other side of a field, in period garb (Victorian in this case), toiling away with a sickle. Not once does he come near the fence on this occasion, because he is busy getting the harvest in. If you came at a different time of year, you might get to chat with him, it depends on how much work needs to be done that day to keep the place running. It's work for him, our "edutainment" is incidental. Good or bad, I'm not sure.



User avatar
steve stanley
Post Knight
Posts: 1122
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 6:07 pm
Location: Leicester

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby steve stanley » Fri Aug 27, 2010 10:13 pm

There's a few places in the US work like that.......wonderful........ :)


"Give me a tent and a kettle

Snowshoes and axe and gun

Send me up in Grand River

Steering by star and sun".

- Labrador Trapper's Song

User avatar
narvek
Posts: 456
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:55 am
Location: Prague, Czech Rep.
Contact:

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby narvek » Sun Aug 29, 2010 12:42 pm

You sure it was a museum rather than an Amish village? :angel:


Eurototty reporting in for duty!

User avatar
Shadowcat
Post Centurion
Posts: 597
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2005 9:03 am
Location: London

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby Shadowcat » Sun Aug 29, 2010 12:46 pm

There's Colonial Williamsburg, but that is 18th century. The people working there were proper clothes, and there are ladies making clothes by hand for the town.

http://www.history.org/history/



User avatar
Gandi
Posts: 115
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2005 4:00 pm
Location: Sussex by the Sea

Re: Do re-enactors REALLY look the part ?

Postby Gandi » Mon Aug 30, 2010 10:11 pm

nutmeg_bec wrote:I'm trying desperately to remember the name of the LH museum in America which has just the kind of portrayal many here seem to envisage: Imagine wandering to the edge of the town, onto the farm. As a member of the public you can see a man accross the other side of a field, in period garb (Victorian in this case), toiling away with a sickle. Not once does he come near the fence on this occasion, because he is busy getting the harvest in. If you came at a different time of year, you might get to chat with him, it depends on how much work needs to be done that day to keep the place running. It's work for him, our "edutainment" is incidental. Good or bad, I'm not sure.


Old Sturbridge Village


Now there's two kinds of wet in my pants!


Return to “Costumes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests