Which way do you hand sew?

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JC Milwr
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Which way do you hand sew?

Post by JC Milwr »

Okay, here's a completely trivial question, I'm just curious.

If you're sewing, say a long seam, do you sew from right to left or left to right? (and are you right or left handed?)

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Alan E
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Post by Alan E »

Either awy from me or towards me :twisted: , I'm right handed.

Sort of right to left in either case :D .
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Sal
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Post by Sal »

Left to right, and I'm left handed :)
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Post by Lady Cecily »

I tend to prefer right to left (right handed) but can go the other way if the piece is awkward to hold.
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purple peril
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Post by purple peril »

I'm right-handed and for seams I hold the fabric with my left hand to sew from right to left, or away from me. Just seems to work best for me doing it that way.

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Shadowcat
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Post by Shadowcat »

Right to left in most situations. I'm right handed, but was taught by a left hander, so thread a needle with my left hand, and sometimes sew seams left to right!!

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Norbury
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Post by Norbury »

Try using a hot glue gun.

Can be used left or right handed.
No previous experience necessary.
Quick.
Great results every time.
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Alan E
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Post by Alan E »

Norbury wrote:Try using a hot glue gun.

Can be used left or right handed.
No previous experience necessary.
Quick.
Great results every time.
But it leaves nasty marks on yer breeches :shock:
'till whispers fill the tower of memory...
The Exiles Company of Medieval Martial Artists: http://the-exiles.org.uk/

Now teaching Fiore's art in Ceredigion (Felinfach) - pm for details

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and if you're not careful....RIIIP!
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Post by frances »

Someone has to say this: it can depend upon which stitch you are using.

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Drachelis
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Post by Drachelis »

Left to right for me - I'm left handed


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Post by WhiteWolf »

Neither, but

Lady P sews right to left and is right handed

WW 8)

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Post by Tuppence »

obviously, does depend on stitch, but for normal sewing:

Right to left, or towards me or away from me, if using right hand

towards me or away from me if using left hand

combination of all the above if using both hands at once (which is mostly done with embroidery only, but with ordianry hand stitching if am tired).


debs

and yes - I know I'm wierd - I can use both hands - cos I was naturally left handed and my aged nursery teacher banned me from using my left hand for anything.
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Alice the Huswyf
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Post by Alice the Huswyf »

Hand seams, right to left.

Buttonholes and eyelets, left to right.

Hemming, left to right.

Overwhipping, front to back. AMENDMENT - if sewing something long an thin away from the body- if bulky then I sew towards the body.

Glue gun, over the ironing board
Last edited by Alice the Huswyf on Sat Feb 11, 2006 3:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Lady Jane »

O.K. I've been hand sewing for over 40 years and I can't think of any stitches I sew away from myself. I'm right handed and I sew most stitches except buttonhole / blanket stitch from right to left, but overstitch left to right towards my body. I first learnt from my mother, then at primary school in Australia, so maybe that would explain it. Do they teach sewing in UK schools? because we tend not to do it till high school here any more. :(

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Post by Alice the Huswyf »

Sewing now comes under design and technology and the younger children now start on the utmost basics as a matter of course in junior school. Senior school allows you to specialise, but I'm afraid it is still seen by a lot of people as a thick or very arty girl's subject. Which is a load of tosh, of course. I would have progressed to a degree in textiles and design subject had there not been internal politics in the staff room which meant that the sewing teacher would not do a second sole-student 'A' level course. So I went to university instead.

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Post by Tuppence »

do some sewing at school - but the not hugely useful king (place mats figured largely).

at first school it was wide count fabric and cross stitch place mats. with frayed edges held in by backstitching. we did that while the boys played football.

at middle school it was how to make glove puppets (for boys and girls).

at high school was really more into electronics and technical drawing, but the sewing was more placemats, this time done by machine.

started a sewing course at college (6th form) but decided not to continue after the first lesson generally consisted of how to cut out without ragged edges, and how to sew a straight seam without using pins (basic o what???!!!!!). I was a bit advanced for it (bored to tears more like), and they wouldn't let me skip to the more involved classes.

then did some sewing while doing fashion.

but i have to say that by far the largest part of my expertise cam from my nana, who sat me down at about three and started me off. (not sure about the age thing - may have been earlier - all I know is it was before I could read, and I could do that quite well by the time I was 4.)

that's been supplemented over the years by reading books and getting tips, swapping tips with other sewing types, and getting on and figuring it out for myself (if I come across something I can't do I just play with it till it works).

Debbie

PS - the school learning can't have been that effective, cos we did knitting too - see the thread about monmouth caps - I can knit - I just can't stop!!!!!
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Post by Drachelis »

Oh those wonderful placemats - my aunt showed me how to embroider and cross stich and needlepoint when I was vdery small and I can remember doing florentine stitch needle cases - oh yes and an awful apron - teacher started me off right handed and wondered why I got messed up.

I suppose my main discovery and experience was making theatrical costumes - right from 13 I was to be found in the wardrobe store at school.

I learnt to pattern cut by myself to make sure the garments were true to my designs.

I agree with Debbie that fiddling with it until you get it right is the best way to create a prototype - first garment always takes ages but the more I make the quicker I geet.


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Post by Bil »

Im right handed and sew right to left, shifting the garment round as needed to make that the case.
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JC Milwr
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Post by JC Milwr »

I think it must be the over-stitch/hemming in which I've found myself different to normal then, cos I do everything right to left, but I'm sure when taking over something from someone else I've had to turn it upside-down. Hemming is the sort of work I'd share, after all!

We actually did proper sewing at secondary school It was Home Economics, so sewing shared with cooking. We did an embroidered cushion cover, a wrap-around skirt, and a blouse which took months and was too small by the time I finished it and left me with an abiding hatred of cuffs and collars!

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Post by Alice the Huswyf »

Started making dolls clothes (coloured sacks more like) when very young. DID do needlework 'O'Level but mainly learnt how to draft, cut, design and by having over-ambitious ideas, starting them, having to get them sorted and then realising I had taken on something too complicated after I had struggled through and finished it. But that's how one continues to learn in life, isn't it?

Mind you the wisdom (for which you can also read exhaustion) of age does mean I now sometimes ask for help as I now know when I am starting to get stuck - a thing I didn't know then!

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Post by Shadowcat »

I embroidered, knitted and did cross stitch as a child, but no clothes sewing - my Mother was a brilliant seamstress. I did one term, no two, at school, where I made a green gingham apron, with embroidered edges, and started a raw silk, sleeveless blouse which I never finished.

I learned all my sewing techniques backwards - that is to say, I mended theatre costumes for ten years as a wardrobe mistress. I could not make, excepot from a pattern, and even then it had to be something extra simple.

I had to learn to sew from necessity when I did a one year costume cutting course at the London College of Fashion as a mature (very - I was 40) student. I had two brilliant tutors, who taught me to make my own patterns, and I then taught myself tailoring - not very well. I don't make the kind of clothes that you ladies and gents make, I think - mine are mostly for dance groups, although I do a lot for museums too.

Maybe one day I'll learn to sew properly!

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Post by Drachelis »

That blouse must have been part of the curriculum in secondary school just like the place mats in primary- I also had it paired with domestic science - and opted for the cookery at 'O' level.

I think the fact that I often had to wear the theatrical costumes heped a lot with my design - having worn some beasts in my time that bit back.

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Post by House of De Clifford »

we'll I'd better join the debate, mum taught me ( Cheryl 'drachelis') and even tho' she is left handed, i am right handed and I can sew right handed but in both directions!!!!!

When I was at school the only things they made us sew were felt OXO cubes!!!!! not very useful........

but i'm stil not v good at cutting patterns from scratch.... i get mum to do it, then i do the rest!!!!!!

I'll never get to Mum's standard tho' ................her stuff is just amazing!!!!

Miranda

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Post by frances »

I can remember having sewing lessons when I was in primary school. And yes, a blouse, and a pinny for a child, but I did not know any little children to give it to. However, I did not like the teacher. One day I saw two children get up and say that they had to go to piano lessons, and they walked out. Oh, this is good, I thought. So the next week I stood up and said excuse me miss (we called all teachers miss in those days) I have to go to piano lessons. I left the class, found the peiano teacher in the hall, and joined in. Hooray, no more sewing lessons. That is how I discovered music, which has become such a big part of my life. However, I made my own clothes when I was a teenager, so I was obviously not put off that much in primary school.

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Post by Drachelis »

I can remember that oxo cube - I had it for years.

Miranda does very strange things (well to me that is) with her hems starting from the left hand side but stitching right to left - gives a lovely herringbone stich on the hem.

Its great that she is one member of my family who doesn't need things sewn for them even if I cut them out.

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Post by Tuppence »

I agree with Debbie that fiddling with it until you get it right is the best way to create a prototype - first garment always takes ages but the more I make the quicker I geet
.

it's my fiddling that gets quicker, since most of what I make is a one off.

little paper mock ups of wierd medieval patterns are wonderful though...
However, I did not like the teacher.
I hated my teacher at middle school and she hated me (she made me unpick that damn glove puppet five times just out of spite - there was nothing wrong with it the first time). I got so frustrated in the end I tipped a glass of water over her!

debs

ps - just thought, with all the talk of hems - if doing a proper one, with buried hemstitch, which way round do you have it - with the rest of the garment towards you, or away from you? (I do it with the garment towards me, or sideways on).
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Alice the Huswyf
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Post by Alice the Huswyf »

..sort of left to right diagonally with the thing coming towards me if it is no bigger than trousers cuffs.

Anything longer, then at whatever angle I can pysically manage it......consistently right handed sewer, though.
Last edited by Alice the Huswyf on Mon Feb 13, 2006 10:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Annie the Pedlar »

Either way. I'm right handed.

A long time ago when I was little in the 50s sewing was taught in schools as part of Domestic Science. The other part was cooking and how you should wash out your dustbin every week :roll:
I was taught to use a sewing machine in Secondary school - a hand one. They didn't want us to go too fast!
One granny taught me to embroider and the other to sew. I used to make loads of doll's clothes.

Now, judging from what I was asked to do as an infant teacher and from what my children have brought home, kids get about an hour a term sewing in primary school - that's 3 hours a year, pathetic isn't it? - and in secondary they do Design and Technology and bring stuff home fastened with safety pins and staples :mrgreen: (<- me feeling sick)

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Drachelis
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Post by Drachelis »

Hemming - I prefer to have the rest of the garment towards me with the folded part of the hem to the top but in awkward spaces I can turn it al round and have the folded part to the bottom.

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