cleaning clothing

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Adam the Archer
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cleaning clothing

Postby Adam the Archer » Fri Apr 09, 2010 11:59 am

Hoping someone can help me.

My doublet is looking nicely worn, but I may need to wear it as part of a servant's livery next weekend, so could really do with having it looking clean!

I am tempted to go for dry cleaning, but don't want to wreck it. It is handswen cream coloured wool, lined and interlined in linen, with linen thread buttons worked over a wooden bead.

Can anyone advise me?

Regards

Adam



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Phil the Grips
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Re: cleaning clothing

Postby Phil the Grips » Fri Apr 09, 2010 12:17 pm

Make sure it is thoroughly dried out by keeping it in an airing cupboard for a day or two, then drybrush off any dirt and then a dose of Febreeze, check for moth damage at the same time.

Dry cleaners should be able to do the job easily, just be sure to tell them what fabrics are used. I am fortunate to have Her Majesty's drycleaner round the corner from me and they are used to bits of Mess kit and unusual regalia arriving from the palace, other drycleaners may baulk though.


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Re: cleaning clothing

Postby Tuppence » Fri Apr 09, 2010 12:36 pm

What he said.

Do bear in mind though, that if it has no label attached with the fibre content and the cleaning instructions (i.e. the little symbols that tell them what kind of solvent to use), a normal high street dry cleaner may well not be insured to clean it, and therefore may refuse to do it.

You're best bet is with a cleaner that already specialises in some way like the one Phil mentions - or one that works for theatrical costumers and the like.


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Re: cleaning clothing

Postby Thomas Hayman » Fri Apr 09, 2010 9:28 pm

My local dry cleaner has gotten used to bits of kit coming through their doors. They just ask to sign a little waiver if it has no care symbols.


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Re: cleaning clothing

Postby Tuppence » Fri Apr 09, 2010 11:53 pm

that'll be cos of the insurance thing.

basically the waiver wil be an agreement that you won't sue them if they use the wrong solvent and wreck the thing.

nb - if having anything cleaned with hooks and eyes (big ones) or metal buttons, then remove them - they can catch on the inside of the machine and rip the garment to shreds. remnants not generally pleasant to view.


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Adam the Archer
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Re: cleaning clothing

Postby Adam the Archer » Sat Apr 10, 2010 1:18 pm

Thanks all

I am a bit worried about the buttons and if there is any shrinkage



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janes-wardrobe
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Re: cleaning clothing

Postby janes-wardrobe » Sat Apr 17, 2010 4:44 pm

I would remove the buttons before taking it to the cleaners. I have personally never had a problem with wool shrinking in the dry cleaning process but there is a first time for everything. The last time I took natural coloured wool to the dry cleaners they did a lovely job, I did have to sign a waiver but generally wool will be fine with the normal dry cleaning fluids used.

I have found linen less likely to shrink than other fibres though it really depends on the supplier - I have found that Ikea linen shrinks though none of the other linen I have ever bought has shrunk.

The only other option would be to hand wash in a mild soap solution. If you rinse with the same temperature water as you wash you shouldn't shock the wool and cause shrinkage. You can spin it in a washing machine on a short spin but NEVER EVER tumble dry wool.

Good luck.


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Re: cleaning clothing

Postby lucy the tudor » Sat Apr 17, 2010 8:52 pm

I would agree with Jane, up to the spinning... I would be terrified to spin dry it at all, and would just lay it flat on a white towel over a drainer over the bath...
But then I always machine wash my wool and linen before I sew with it these days, so mine takes 40 degree water and a hand wash well.
The very dry brushing and febreze method would seem favorite for an initial go, not too hard or expensive, and if it doesn't work you can always try plan B?


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Re: cleaning clothing

Postby janes-wardrobe » Sat Apr 17, 2010 9:04 pm

You could lay the wet doublet on a towel over the bath but it will take much longer to dry, even if you squeeze the excess water out by hand. Don't rub the wool and don't wring the doublet. That will almost certainly damage it.

Honestly Lucy, spinning is fine - but a short spin is preferable and you don't have to spin at top speed if you're worried.


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