Modern version of "camlet"?

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Shadowcat
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Modern version of "camlet"?

Postby Shadowcat » Sat Oct 10, 2009 2:06 pm

I've been asked to make a "Camlet" doublet, lined with changeablesarsenet. I think the sarsenet/sarcenet can fairly succesfully be replicated with shot taffeta, but I am not sure of what to use for camlet. I thought maybe a fine wool, but am open to suggestions. The date for the garments is after 1485.

S.



Theotherone
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Re: Modern version of "camlet"?

Postby Theotherone » Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:07 pm

Hiya

Camlet gets a mention at the tail end of this thread viewtopic.php?f=3&t=16142&hilit=camlet&start=30 , if that's any help. My memory may be faulty, but I was sure it had a thread of it's own somewhere.


Because there would have to be three of them.

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Shadowcat
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Re: Modern version of "camlet"?

Postby Shadowcat » Sat Oct 10, 2009 3:18 pm

Thanks - I had the impression that it was nowadays a fine wool, but that seems to indicate that a silk repp would do. Feels wrong for a man's doublet somehow, although he is rather high status, and the clothes come as a gift from Henry Tudor.

s.



frances
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Re: Modern version of "camlet"?

Postby frances » Sun Oct 11, 2009 3:57 am

Hi S

I have just come across this definition.

Camlet - a popular fabric in Regency times using silk or wool and hair with a plain or twill appearance. A large variety of cloths produced under this name including broad, checked, brocade, flowered, watered mohair, unglazed, shot, spotted glazed and many stripes. Figured camlet had figures stamped on them with hot irons. Water camlet was first treated with water and then hotpressed leaving it marked and with a smooth lustre. Other names Harateen, Moreen, Grosgram, Groginette and Cheanis when finished using differing methods.

http://www.antique-vintage-designs.co.u ... les.html#C



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Jenn
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Re: Modern version of "camlet"?

Postby Jenn » Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:04 am

In the King' Servants by Caroline Johnson - which is talking about the period you're interested in says on pg 11 " For some servants of middling rank, the half silk fabrics Camlet and silk de Bruges were used. Only the warp threads of these were silk, but they were so closely spaced that the weft threads, of cheaper fibres such as linen, were hidden. Camlet had a plain weave using a thick weft, which gave a horizontally ribbed appearance similar to grosgrain".




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