Drop spinning and carding questions

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mally ley
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Postby mally ley » Tue Sep 15, 2009 2:40 pm

Medicus Matt wrote:Do you do the early Anglo-Saxon ones, the ones that look like a load of six inch nails in a two blocks of wood with iron backing?

Those sound like combs, not carders - different animal.



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Medicus Matt
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Postby Medicus Matt » Tue Sep 15, 2009 3:39 pm

Entirely possible...

What's the difference between combing and carding then...in terms of the process of turning sheep into trousers?


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mally ley
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Postby mally ley » Tue Sep 15, 2009 6:25 pm

Medicus Matt wrote:Entirely possible...

What's the difference between combing and carding then...in terms of the process of turning sheep into trousers?

<rushes off to look it up> . . . <or wait for someone more knowledgeable to answer>



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fishwife
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Postby fishwife » Tue Sep 15, 2009 11:20 pm

The "period" covers from 13th century to 17th century - they didn't change until curved backs came in in the 17th C.

The combs you are taking about we don't do yet - Jack Green had some at the Feb market, hopefully he is going to do more!


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fishwife
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Postby fishwife » Tue Sep 15, 2009 11:26 pm

For modern day - carding is used for woolen spinning and combing for worsted spinning.

Combing was all that was available to the pre 13th C so all yarn had a much more compact twist, carding allows you to trap air into the fibres making "long draw" easier - the way you spin on a great wheel.

Not very well explained, hope it makes sense!!!


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ViscontesseD'Asbeau
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Postby ViscontesseD'Asbeau » Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:18 pm

Fishwife's carders are very good. I have some old, very nice worn in Schact (US made) cards - bought years ago and they work fine but... Fishwife's are now my weapon of choice since I got them have hardly touched my Schacts. They didn't seem to even need breaking in, either. Huge recommend. (And she didn't pay me to say that). I use them even for my 'modern' spinning.

We probably should also say that a distaff is only of use for worsted (longwool) spinning. For woollen (shortdraw) you need carders. So the fibre you'd see on a distaff would be combed, not carded and gives you a very different sort of yarn. :lol:

If you look at medieval images of spinners with spindles, they always seem to have a distaff so it is a bit of a re-enactorism to spin on a spindle with no distaff. Piece of forked wood from the nearest tree does the job, especially if you're on the go asyou can tuck it under yer arm. But if you're using a great wheel, you're probably better off with carded wool, although you can use the distaff too for that.

In 'real life' when not doing living history, a wrist distaff is the thing. (Simple bracelet of braid, weighted with a few beads).

Fishwife, who was it used to make the 'Viking' combs in the US? I dunno if they are still going. I hope Jack Greene does make some more combs - will look out for them.



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paul bennett
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Postby paul bennett » Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:43 pm

From the research and feedback on my cone distaffs, it seems they are best for spinning linen, as you can line the fibres up on the cone.


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Medicus Matt
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Postby Medicus Matt » Wed Sep 16, 2009 1:35 pm

fishwife wrote:
Combing was all that was available to the pre 13th C



Ahhh, fair enough. Explains my ignorance then. Ta very much.


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Sophia
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Postby Sophia » Wed Sep 16, 2009 1:44 pm

I don't bother with a wrist distaff - simply wrap a long diz around my wrist. Works quite well, particularly when wearing a long sleeved kirtle or gown.

Sophia :D


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ViscontesseD'Asbeau
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Postby ViscontesseD'Asbeau » Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:35 am

Sophia wrote:I don't bother with a wrist distaff - simply wrap a long diz around my wrist. Works quite well, particularly when wearing a long sleeved kirtle or gown.

Sophia :D


LOL Fair play to you! :D I must admit I favour a wrist distaff because it gives me an excuse to tablet weave very small lengths of braid so it's fun to try out new patterns, but I get bored quick and can never be bothered to weave for long so a wrist distaff is a nice little TW project!

So far as I know, in Europe they are a 20thC thing though so I don't use one for re-enactment. (Sorely tempted though they are so much easier than a stick!)




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