clogs

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ben
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clogs

Postby ben » Wed Dec 17, 2008 11:03 pm

I recently bought some clogs (i'm wierd that way) and I'm asking about the authenticity of them for use in the War of the Roses period. I have had a search about and found references throughout the medieval period, but I thought I'd ask here, as you guys know everything!

Ben



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robin wood
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Postby robin wood » Wed Dec 17, 2008 11:52 pm

Since your in Hereford I suspect you got them from Jerry Atkinson? He mostly makes 19th and early 20th C patterns. I don't know what style was common in your period but would be surprised if they were the same.

Jerry's clogs are simply the best by the way, I have 2 pairs, a work pair and a sunday pair, gorgeous.



ben
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Postby ben » Thu Dec 18, 2008 12:13 am

no, i got the from torm, didn't know about this chap in Hereford..cool
they are pretty standard stereotypical dutch clogs....
Ben



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robin wood
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Postby robin wood » Thu Dec 18, 2008 9:13 am

definitely a big no no then, English clogs have wooden soles and leather uppers. As far as I known no all wooden clog has ever been found from a UK excavation.



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sally
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Postby sally » Thu Dec 18, 2008 9:33 am

I've asked the clogmaker at St Fagans (probably the last one doing absolutely everything by hand including felling the trees, no powered machinery goes any where near the clog start to finish and the soles are carved to match the contours of your foot) to see if he can conjur up a history of clog styles based on the collections he has access to, there are lots of regional variations as well as broader date ones. Must ask how he's getting in, he's doing me a 'modern' pair (traditional style, just two shades of green leather instead, going to be my party clogs :D



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robin wood
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Postby robin wood » Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:39 am

sally wrote:I've asked the clogmaker at St Fagans (probably the last one doing absolutely everything by hand including felling the trees, no powered machinery goes any where near the clog start to finish and the soles are carved to match the contours of your foot) to see if he can conjur up a history of clog styles based on the collections he has access to, there are lots of regional variations as well as broader date ones. Must ask how he's getting in, he's doing me a 'modern' pair (traditional style, just two shades of green leather instead, going to be my party clogs :D


Geraint is a lovely chap, not the last he learnt from Jerry a couple of years ago, how is he getting on? My wife Nicola was involved in the project recording the skills handover on video. Here is a short clip showing the research if you are interested.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=VmKjvhQ4IHg

And here is Jerry on the cover of his 1984 shire book on clogs

Image

here is his website but don't expect answers to emails he is a total luddite

http://www.clogmaker.co.uk/



Marcus Woodhouse
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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Thu Dec 18, 2008 2:02 pm

The poor of Florence were called cloggi by the rich and infamous of that fair city from the 14th century (at least).


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

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Sophia
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Postby Sophia » Thu Dec 18, 2008 2:09 pm

I have often wondered if the traditional English clog with its wooden sole and leather upper developed from or in parallel with the patons worn in the Mediaeval period.

It would probably bear some research - maybe when I have finished all the other projects I have on hand.

Soph :D


aka Thomasin Chedzoy, Tailor at Kentwell Hall

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robin wood
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Postby robin wood » Thu Dec 18, 2008 2:41 pm

Marcus Woodhouse wrote:The poor of Florence were called cloggi by the rich and infamous of that fair city from the 14th century (at least).


And the word sabotage comes from French versions of our Luddites lobbing their clogs or sabots into the mill machinery.

Edit just checked online etymology and looks like its not quite that simple

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabotage



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Karen Larsdatter
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Re: clogs

Postby Karen Larsdatter » Thu Dec 18, 2008 4:24 pm

One of my friends out here has been successful at retrofitting the traditional-style Dutch clog into WOTR-era pattens. Is that something you might be interested in? (I can point him at this thread, and see if he can describe the process.) :)

As to whether the word was used in the Middle Ages -- see http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/m/mec/med ... s=28723557



ben
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Postby ben » Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:51 pm

thanks for the info!

I may look at the patten idea, as it would still be cheaper than pattens, most likely.
Although I still intend to make my own pattens one day...I just need to get my rear engaged and get out there and find the pre-requistite alder.....

Ben




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