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houppelande (?sp)

Posted: Wed Dec 17, 2008 12:56 pm
by Gothic-Haven
Hello all you lovely costume experts... I was given a lovely leather belt/stomacher as an early crimly pressy.. its blue leather with embossing and a large brass buckle... now I need to make the houppelande and wonder if anyone has the "idiots guide" I can sew and have cut patterns but am no expert..

any help greatly appreciated

Re: houppelande (?sp)

Posted: Wed Dec 17, 2008 4:47 pm
by Karen Larsdatter
Which style are you looking at doing? (Men's? women's? any particular specifications as to neckline?)

Posted: Thu Dec 18, 2008 5:26 pm
by Gothic-Haven
well it woud be for me so a woman.. a square or round neck not too high would be good.. nothing overly fancy as I am not that high status it would be nice to have something to show off the belt with.. not too long sleeves either :-)

Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 4:39 am
by Karen Larsdatter
Okay -- roughly what year (or at least what part of the 15th century -- I presume this is for 15th century, right?) are you looking for?

Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:20 pm
by Gothic-Haven
Mid to late 15th.. I am with The Thomas Stanley retinue..

Posted: Tue Dec 23, 2008 2:09 pm
by Colin Middleton
Didn't houplands go out in the early 15th? Is it one of those terms that changes it's meaning over time or gets 'confused' a lot by re-enactors, so that we're all talking about different garments?

Posted: Tue Dec 23, 2008 3:29 pm
by Karen Larsdatter
Colin Middleton wrote:Didn't houplands go out in the early 15th? Is it one of those terms that changes it's meaning over time or gets 'confused' a lot by re-enactors, so that we're all talking about different garments?

I think the latter's more to the point. Out here, we generally seem to use the term to cover a lot of the 15th century gowns worn by men and women. In the Middle Ages, though, I'm not sure what distinguished a houppelande from other overgarments.

Marc Carlson has found the word houpelande dating back at least to 1281. The Middle English Dictionary finds examples from 1380, 1393, 1415, 1423, and 1429; the only thing one can clearly discern from their descriptions is that they're a fur-trimmed (or fur-lined) wool garment.

Posted: Sun Dec 28, 2008 9:00 pm
by Colin Middleton
Thanks Karen, that's about what I'd expected. So Gothic Havern, what do you mean by a Houppeland?

Also, have you tried the Medieval Tailor's Assistant as an obvious starting point?

All the best