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What to give for New Year, 1526!

Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 2:02 pm
by lidimy
Just in case you were to run out of ideas....

The WARDROBE (New Year's Gifts).
Shirts and other stuff delivered to the hands of Harry Norres by Sir Wm. Compton, 18 Jan. 17 Hen. VIII.
A shirt with a high collar wrought with black and white silk of freres knots; 3 similar borders in each sleeve, wrought with open seams of black silk. A shirt with gold lozenges of Spanish work at the collar and hand. A cambric shirt, the collar and hands wrought like "jelofers." 10 shirts, with clouds at the collars and ruffled at the hand. 9 shirts of white work, square-collared. A Milan shirt, wrought at the collar and hands with gold, and open-seemed with black silk. 2 shirts, one with clouds, the other of white work, with a surfull of black silk. 11 square-collared shirts with clouds of black silk. 9 linen coifs for the night. 3 ruffled shaving cloths. 2 high-collared shirts of Spanish work, of the new fashion. 2 night shirts, one white, one wrought with black and white silk. 65 handkerchers, broken and whole. 6 night coifs, broken; 4 rubbers. 5 Milan shirts; the collar and hands wrought with gold and silk and open seams with black silk and gold; others, the collar wrought with gold and pyrled with pomegranates and roses; with pyrles of gold on red silk; with a border on the collar and pyrles of silver, &c.; in all, 94 shirts, 13 fair coifs, 3 being of pyrles piped with gold. A little silver bottle for "nesing powder, and a pipe belonging to it." 3 bundles of Awdre laces. A fair greyhound's collar, wrought in the school with gilt tyrretts. A round case with wooden trenchers. A bag with cramp rings upon a yellow lace. A button with a gold calle and a tassel of red silk and gold, with a purse.
New Year's Gifts, anno 17o.
A bonnet trimmed with 4 pair of buttons, a gold brooch and 2 images, one of mother of pearl, given by the marquis of Exeter. Shirts given by the lady Marquis, ladies Hastings, Shelton, Wynkefelde, and Guldeforde, Mrs. Norres, Sir John Waloppe and Sir Edw. Baynton; pieces of cambric by ladies Salisbury and Fitzwater; bonnets by lady Kingston, Sir Ant. Browne and Mr. Wm. Care; aglets by Mr. Palmer of Guisnes; a brooch by Byrche; a shirt, 6 coifs and 6 handkerchiefs by Mrs. Phillipps; and a piece of linen cloth by the duchess of Buckingham.

From: 'Henry VIII: January 1526, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII: 1524-1530, Volume 4 (1875), pp. 831-849. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report ... mpid=91247. Date accessed: 06 November 2008.

The site/resource/online archivy thing usually does politically importanty statey type documents but one occassionally comes across the odd costuming gem, and I had to share!! :D Do follow the link - about a third of the way down (Jan 14th) there's a whole list of supplies for decorations and costumes for a 'revel'. I mean seriously, it's brilliant, do pay it a visit!!! :D :D :D :D I quite like the sound of a coif piped with gold - please? :lol:



unless it's been doing the circuit for a long time and everyone has read this stuff yeeeaaars ago.. in which case ignore me, I find it very exciting :oops:

Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 3:45 pm
by steve stanley
Lidi,
As one of our resident Tudorists.......could You give me a clue to men's doublets about 1540....square neckline or collar?.....reading a novel & getting my mental pictures mixed......
Steve

Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 5:45 pm
by lidimy
By 1540, collar, I'm sure some more knowledgeable Tudorists can tell you at which point exactly the yucky square ones go out? :lol:

Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 5:55 pm
by steve stanley
Cheers!.....Collars much nicer..... :)
Steve

Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 6:00 pm
by lidimy
Tis true, I just checked some piccies of Henry VIII and in the 1530s it looks like the square is widening and becoming shallower, more like a curve, then it moves right up to the neck and gets a diddy collar.

Agreed... those little man-dresses are so not nice :lol:

Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 9:36 pm
by red razors
good link lidi! :)

Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2008 11:05 pm
by lidimy
It is absolutely fantastic, I was trawling through it for early references to the depth of devotion Henry held towards the Pope and in particular Catholicism; but naturally, as it covers many different types of documents, the odd costuming references to come up as well, and that one was so wonderful I just couldn't keep it to myself! :D

But what on earth are 'clouds'? :shock: :D

Posted: Fri Nov 07, 2008 7:57 pm
by red razors
that's what i wanted to know too when i was reading it :|

Posted: Sun Nov 09, 2008 9:19 pm
by lidimy
And why would you give something that's 'broken' as a gift? :roll: I'd ask for the receipt!

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 11:30 am
by Annis
lidimy wrote:I'd ask for the receipt!
Ah, be careful what you say there. There are 2 meanings for receipt :P

1540s collar....

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 11:54 am
by myladyswardrobe
Lidi,
As one of our resident Tudorists.......could You give me a clue to men's doublets about 1540....square neckline or collar?.....reading a novel & getting my mental pictures mixed......
Steve
Hi Steve,

You will be pleased to know that collars on shirts appear in the 1530s. The wide almost "boat necked" style is more of a 1520s/early 1530s.

This page shows Henry VIII's shirt collar fashions very clearly: http://www.elizabethan-portraits.com/Henry_VIII.htm

All the best

Bess Chilver
www.myladyswardrobe.com

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:37 pm
by steve stanley
Now have correct mental picture for reading latest Shardlake novel..... :)
Steve

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 5:52 pm
by lidimy
steve stanley wrote:Now have correct mental picture for reading latest Shardlake novel..... :)
Steve
And a few ideas for some New Year gifts, yes? :lol:

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:16 pm
by steve stanley
lidimy wrote:
steve stanley wrote:Now have correct mental picture for reading latest Shardlake novel..... :)
Steve
And a few ideas for some New Year gifts, yes? :lol:
Hmm...I could get really interested in 1540's military......Much nicer than that Elizabethan stuff... :)
Steve

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:27 pm
by lidimy
Tis true, all Henrician stuff is better than Elizabethan! With very few exceptions, anyway!


*ducks and runs before Annis gets here*

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:35 pm
by steve stanley
I won't tell her if You don't......I just think the Masculine costume is more strutty & rufty-tufty than the later rather girly stuff...... :D :D

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:38 pm
by lidimy
No pearl earring for you then? :lol:

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:41 pm
by steve stanley
Answer not suitable for your young ears........

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 8:59 pm
by red razors
hmmmm, lidi i just tried the link and it's not working... i only get an empty page.

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:05 pm
by lidimy
Oh - you're right!! :shock: But the british History template still comes up?

Try from here:

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/journal.aspx

Then 'Calenders of State Papers: Letters and Papers, Henry VIII'

Then 1524 - 1530, then January 1526... see if that works?

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:09 pm
by Merlon.
the original url includes a full stop, correct link is http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report ... mpid=91247

Lidi, one of the meanings of the word broken is "in pieces", or in this case not assembled

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:32 pm
by lidimy
Ooops, my bad!


Thanks Merlon - still a bit of a rubbishy present though (methinks?) "Take ye this my lady, this package doth bear a coif of selfe assemblye, please ye to have it."???

I mean really...

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:35 pm
by steve stanley
lidimy wrote:Ooops, my bad!


Thanks Merlon - still a bit of a rubbishy present though (methinks?) "Take ye this my lady, this package doth bear a coif of selfe assemblye, please ye to have it."???

I mean really...
Alleyne key included?

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:38 pm
by lidimy
A whaty whaty what?

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:46 pm
by steve stanley
lidimy wrote:A whaty whaty what?
Sorry...middle-aged thing for people who buy 'ready-to-assemble' stuff from Ikea......

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:49 pm
by lidimy
Ahh, sorry, showing my age! :lol:

Posted: Mon Nov 10, 2008 11:09 pm
by red razors
it works now, thanks!

Posted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:55 am
by Annis
lidimy wrote:Tis true, all Henrician stuff is better than Elizabethan! With very few exceptions, anyway!


*ducks and runs before Annis gets here*

Whatchit! :evil:

I prefer Elizabethan than Henrican, and I haven't even made my Henrican stuff yet. At least with Elizabethan you can have boned bodies and farthingales (although anything from 1590 onwards is just yucky)

Posted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 11:24 am
by steve stanley
Split the difference...Edwardian?...Marian?...

Posted: Wed Nov 12, 2008 11:39 am
by lidimy
*burns with resentment*

1555 and not a year more!!!


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: