Medeival wool textures (weaves)

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Duvan
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Medeival wool textures (weaves)

Post by Duvan »

I have no idea about that myself...
but when buying wool for making medieval clothes should you look for some kind of particular texture/weave?

I notice some of them have a soft side and a harder (back side?) side.
Some also have "lines", real textures in it and are harder, while others are just soft like a typical blanket.

How did really woolen cloth look in the middle ages?

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sally
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Post by sally »

It would be well worth you asking your library for a copy of the Museum of Londons book 'Textiles and Clothing, C.1150-c.1450: Finds from Medieval Excavations in London'. This is particularly useful as as well as some very useful illustrations of surviving garments and discussion on what was going on at the time, there are some good clear pictures of surviving fabric scraps.

Broadly speaking, you are safe with tabby weaves (threads go over one, under one in a simple pattern, most shirts, bedlinen etc are woven like this) and twill weaves (simplest one is over two under two though there are a lot of twills, the effect is a series of diagonal fine lines in the weave, if you remebber school uniform trousers, they often were in this weave). There are lots of patterned weaves that were used too, but you'd want to check those for each dateline that you protray before buying fabric.

As to texture, some periods liked to full their cloth (that means shrinking it slightly to thicken and slightly felt the cloth), others didnt, so again, dateline is everything, some periods need clear weave patterns visible, others are ok if you can barely see the weave.

Any of the reputable fabric dealers will be able to help you choose the fabrics that have the widest use, but to be safe, do a bit of research into what has been found archaeologically for your chosen period and region and stay as close to that as possible. You'll get the hang of fabric weaves pretty fast

Duvan
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Post by Duvan »

Thanks for the good information!

Can I still ask, would there be a general guideline for the pre 14th century europe... That is 1100-1250 A.D. or something like that.

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Colin Middleton
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Post by Colin Middleton »

The fabric that I found stranges was broadcloth. It feels like the felt used on a snooker table, really heavy and dense and matted.

Thankfully, Duvan won't have to worry about that as it appears in the mid 14th Century.
Colin

"May 'Blood, blood, blood' be your motto!"

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