Position of sleeve seams - along the inner or outer arm?

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Aislinn
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Position of sleeve seams - along the inner or outer arm?

Post by Aislinn »

While discussing kit the topic of sleeve seams arose; primarily whether they should run along the inner arm (as with most patterns and modern clothing - see the diagram) or along the outer arm (see the photo). It was suggested that the outer arm is more correct for some periods even though most people use the inner arm for all.

My question - for which periods/status is one accurate and for which the other?

Thanks
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Seam runs from shoulder along top of arm to outer wrist.
Seam runs from shoulder along top of arm to outer wrist.
Seam runs from armpit along inside/under arm to inner wrist.
Seam runs from armpit along inside/under arm to inner wrist.

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Alice the Huswyf
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Post by Alice the Huswyf »

Back of the arm like a suit seam for C15th once inset shaped sleeves and fit are developed.

C15th linens, C14th kirtles and earlier, where reach is being created by armpit gussets have to be done with an under-arm seam like modern clothes or you cannot set the gusset.

Some periods actually make the sleeve a two part construction, so that you have an under and back seam.

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Tuppence
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Post by Tuppence »

Depends on the period.

The version I use most often is a two piece sleeve (seam at back of arm and front.

but for some it should be only at the back.

And as alice says, for shifts and body linens, and early tunics, it should be under the sleeve.

of course, for some really early tunics there were no seams at all - they were tube woven, but that's another story.
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Alice the Huswyf
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Post by Alice the Huswyf »

So does that mean we can make everything out of spiral-knit jersey? :twisted:

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Post by frances »

For the 18th century it is under the arm; for the late 18th century the sleeve is in two shaped parts, one on top, one under the arm. For the third quarter of the 20th century it is one piece with the seam on the inside and a dart at the inner elbow ...... and so on.

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Tuppence
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Post by Tuppence »

So does that mean we can make everything out of spiral-knit jersey?
Only if you're greek or roman
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Alice the Huswyf
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Post by Alice the Huswyf »

If it is Roman, can I also use PURPLE polyester spiral knit jersey, darted empire line with short, shapred inset sleeves, bodice 6 panel shaped and gored skirt with a little vertical strip of flounce hanging loose to hide the zip when running to the Tardis?

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Jenn
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Post by Jenn »

yup but only if I can use the other bolelyn girl as my sole reference for Tudor clothes
hmm green polyester

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Shadowcat
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Post by Shadowcat »

Jenn wrote:yup but only if I can use the other bolelyn girl as my sole reference for Tudor clothes
hmm green polyester
What, not "The Tudors"?

S.

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