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drew
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knitting

Postby drew » Wed Apr 02, 2008 10:40 pm

How do I go about learning how to knit. All I need to be able to do is knit a rough cardigan style item. Nothing flash, rough and ready. My idea is for it to gowith a 1800 Cent' tinkers outfit.



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sally
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Postby sally » Thu Apr 03, 2008 8:34 am

Do you have a particular extant item or pattern in mind? That will help us suggest the best way of tackling it.



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ViscontesseD'Asbeau
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Postby ViscontesseD'Asbeau » Thu Apr 03, 2008 12:28 pm

I knit things from the period before and the period after, but have no knowledge of 18thC knitting, so hesitate to reply! What I can give you is some general advice that might set you in good stead for whatever your project is.....

One bit of general advice is - I'd start with something smaller and less ambitious but with the same skills, eg: a hat, before I tackled summat big.

Also, learn to knit in the round from the start as even open fronted garments seem to have been knitted in the round almost into the 20thC - with a central panel of stitches called a 'steek'. You then do something very brave and cut down the steek when the garment is complete - I've done it and it's terrifying taking a pair of scissors to several months worth of work! You need a few vodkas and a steady hand... (despite the vodkas).... You then sew up either side FAST to stop it unravelling, then pick up those stitches....

So (and I'm not familiar with 18thC knitting but certainly am with 19thC), I'm guessing at that date you'd be knitting in the round.

If you want to knit traditionally, you might as well bite the bullet and start with knitting in the round - and say a hat is a do-able project. But be aware making a more ambitious project like this, you are very likely emulating the work of skilled professionals, who know the 'mysteries' at that date - most garments were knitted en masse in places like the Yorkshire Dales, by outworkers - highly skilled women. I wouldn't assume because it's 'in the past', knitting is an easy option - the concept of knitting as a homely thing is a largely late Victorian invention. Stockings, caps and presumably larger garments were, like the later fishermen's ganseys, knitted by people with many years' experience and a high skill level (not putting you off, just trying to convey that maybe what you describe ain;t a beginners' project!) Even people who have been knitting a lifetime would never attempt a garment with a steek as it is so terrifying! And yes the garment I made was a copy of a 1930's Shetland cardigan and, 20 years on, it's still perfect and none of the stitches came unravelled! So it works!

Modern (flat not in the round) knitting, owes a lot to tailoring - nice little shaped flat pieces knit separately then sewn together afterwards. But knitting until the 20thC owed nothing to tailoring - garments were shaped in more ingenious ways. I can knit a big project and honestly say at the end of it there isn't a single stitch of sewing in it - it's all done on the needles.

The other thing to bear in mind is whether to use double pointed needles or a circular one. The modern circular ones make knitting in the round a breeze - especially a good set of Addi turbos! If you wanted to knit in living history don't use wooden needles as it's a re-enactorism - most knitting was professional and they used plain steel - fast, efficient, last a lifetime. You can still find them in charity shops - the metal (not grey or plasticised) ones. Or buy them from here:

http://www.ganseys.co.uk/

If I was doing a big project, I'd work at home on the circular needles but transfer the project to the steel ones, for the event.

My other advice is - and if you ignore everything else, think about this one! - forget the 'Victorian drawing room' knitting technique that most people who learned in the 20thC use. Look for an instructional thing (book, YouTube whatever) that teaches you what the yanks call 'traditional' knitting - we used to call 'continental' - look for someone who is showing you how to knit with the wool on the left and the needles under your fists, rather than slipped like pens, over your thumb. If everything is under the thumb you knit faster more efficiently and this lends itself to the kind of historical knitting you want to do more. It's a pain in the bottom if you learn one technique then have to relearn the other. Luckily I was taught to knit the traditional way anyway - but remember all the comments I got for my freaky and unattractive knitting style! Was only years later when I did the research I realised I was in fact dead lucky to have been taught to knit like that, as it lends itself to big projects in the round and people who have learned since the 80s try to emulate the 'old way' as it is so much easier!

The only full body 17thC garment I can think of is a petticoat with the most elaborate figurative pictures done in purl stitches, and the knitted silk shirt of Charles I, equally elaborate - all one colour knitting, but the patterns done in Purl. I think this is probably what evolved into the gansey by the early 19thC - so I'm not sure what came between them. Without a doubt, you would have to knit in the round then cut a steek if you feel there is a front opening. I could be wrong as 18thC is not my period but it's my impression that knitting shaped pieces and sewing together is a 1920s onwards ting.

Until about 1850 (ish), body garments seem to be started with garter stitch - when knitting in the round, this means you K and P alternate rows to get the same effect you would by just K-ing in flat knitting. So ribbed welts are out!

The best books on figuring out how to knit for yourself, are by the late, great Elizabeth Zimmerman. Not sure if they still carry them, but you used to be able to get EZ's books here:

http://www.fibrecrafts.com/

Another thing I'd say is - do what works for you. I tend to knit inside out because I can purl faster than knit. EZ was the other way and she would do anything to avoid a p stitch.

No doubt there are plenty of beginners' how tos on YouTube and that's probably the easiest way to learn to knit.

:lol:

Ah one last thing - be aware that no modern millspun wool comes close to handspun, so it may be hard to achieve the effect you want (especially if felting) with modern shop bought wool. They are treated with chemicals to stop shrinking, keep it looking slick and glossy, mothproofing, etc so they don;t look or act like 'real' wool. Ditto if using silk. The silk I spin is in no way comparable to anything you can buy. So for a big project like that you must be sure you have enough of the right materials, even to start.

As I say, if you start with a more realistic project then work yer way up. I've been knitting a long time at fairly high speed, and still would hesitate to take on a large but plain garment as it's pretty boring! But each to his/her own. If you tell us what the pattern or source for your garment is, I can get a better idea how to help you!

:D



drew
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Postby drew » Fri Apr 04, 2008 12:52 am

OMG! Thank you so much for taking the time to answer the question...and more.

I think that I may need to change my mind on this project or at least put it on the back burner.

Thanks again.

Drew



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Postby ViscontesseD'Asbeau » Fri Apr 04, 2008 1:05 am

Drew don't be put off knitting! Just start with something easy and take it from there!

Here's my place where I go for inspiration. She had to get rather drunk too, to cut a steek:

http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/



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Postby laura » Tue Apr 15, 2008 11:31 am

You don't have to be an expert to knit in the round, just very methodical!

I never knitted a stitch til my 30s when I taught myself from a 1920s Weldon's leaflet on knitting stockings.

As a result now I can only knit in the round and can only knit stockings. I'm exceedingly slow but it's near perfect in result, very rarely any dropped or missed stitches and very even in tension.

Just get a set of four double-pointed needles (dpn's) and some yarn and start trying.

For my first-ever attempt, I used bigger needles and thicker wool and made a huge oddly-shaped stocking as a result for my mother to use as an Xmas stocking, in bright red! ;-)

Now I knit stockings ad infinitum as my LH 'prop'.

Also consider a knitting belt or sheath or stick, which is a regionally variable (belt in Scotland, sheath or stick in N.England and Wales, apparently nothing in southern England) accessory that holds the unused end of the needle you would hold in your right hand, the one the stitches are being knitted onto. It speeds you up and means you can drop the knitting to stir the pot or grab a child without the knitting going everywhere and coming off the needles.

laura



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Postby Tuppence » Tue Apr 15, 2008 12:32 pm

You don't have to be an expert to knit in the round, just very methodical!


completely!!

I have trouble with knitting - could just never pick it up.

I have trouble with casting on and off (though can just about manage), or with anything other than a basic plain knit stitch.

But I can knit in the round on four or more needles - so it really can't be that hard!


"What a lovely hat! But may I make one teensy suggestion? If it blows off, don't chase it."
Miss Piggy
RIP Edward the avatar cat.

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Postby laura » Tue Apr 15, 2008 12:36 pm

That's what I love about my trusty LH stocking - I just go knit, knit, knit, knit... round and round and round... no thinking, no checking to see which is the front or back, should I be knitting or purlin g- nope, just knit, knit, knit, knit....!

I also struggle with start and end... I'm sure I've never cast on twice in the same way...

laura



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Postby Random Mumblings » Tue Apr 15, 2008 12:49 pm

laura wrote:
I also struggle with start and end... I'm sure I've never cast on twice in the same way...

laura


You could try www.knittinghelp.com Really helpful site with close up, slow and very detailed video describing and showing how to do loads of knitting stitches and techniques. Even helped me as a total lefthanded knitter.



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Postby ViscontesseD'Asbeau » Tue Apr 15, 2008 7:20 pm

Yes, knitting in the round is easier, never said otherwise - my point was, Drew would be best doing that from the start! Also, the knitting isn't as scary as the cutting into the knitting which would need to be done for the garment as described.

Your tension is automatically better if you knit in the round, and you can pick up speed much easier if you practice!

As I said above, start on summat in the round but simple - like a hat! Also, if you're not knitting at events, consider circular needles as they are much faster and don't leave the less experienced knitter with weird tensioning problems where you swap needles! If knitting at an event, you can easily slip it onto double pointed steel needles! Anyone can knit in the round is a no-brainer.... the hard part is taking a pair of scissors to several months' work! The yarn harlot in her early blogs described doing just this! Wish this had been around when I learned to knit!

http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/

Also, for Drew or anyone, here is the biggest knitting community online - waiting list, but you should get on at some point and it has all the resources you need:

https://www.ravelry.com/

It's worth new knitters learning to knit 'the old way' AND in the round from the start - if they want to do a lot of 'historical' knitting just so you can pick up speed and not have to unlearn and relearn techniques unnecessarily.

Hope that's useful!
:lol:

PS: Laura - I get bored knitting plain, so do a simple Gunnister style wale ( two moss stitch tram lines with some plain between - simple alternating a few purl st) which marks a back 'seam' and stops me dying of boredom - also fancy clocks because they're fun to knit and machine knitted stockings can't do them! The wale is: K1, P1, K3, P1, K2 alternating with K2, P1, K3, P1, K1. It's handy as it helps you centre the clocks and centre the heel flap and breaks up the tedium of plain knitting.



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Postby laura » Tue Apr 15, 2008 9:44 pm

Ooh viscontesse, do you have any definite details about turning the heel on a mid-C17th stocking, please?

I knit a Gunnister 'seam' too but I'm stupidly copying the finest one fo the three, the one used as a foot patching one of the two main ones - so it's ridiculously fine gauge (it's iirc either 12 stitches x 15 rows to the inch, or 15 stitches and 12 rows to the inch), fool that I am...
I'm doing a simple 'seam' of knitting all round then P1, K1, on the last stitches, and start the next round as K1, P1 and then just knitting. so it's KKKKPKKPKKKKK [etc]

I really don't know what to do when I reach the heel though as none of those three has a heel extant. I've written to the Museum to ask if they have any detailed descriptions of contemporary heels - there's some weird things out there online claiming to be authentic mid-C17th heels, but no references to extant ones, so I don't know how they arrive at their instructions...

I'd be very happy if anyone can point me at anything definite!

laura



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Postby ViscontesseD'Asbeau » Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:47 am

laura wrote:Ooh viscontesse, do you have any definite details about turning the heel on a mid-C17th stocking, please?

....I really don't know what to do when I reach the heel though as none of those three has a heel extant. I've written to the Museum to ask if they have any detailed descriptions of contemporary heels - there's some weird things out there online claiming to be authentic mid-C17th heels, but no references to extant ones, so I don't know how they arrive at their instructions...

I'd be very happy if anyone can point me at anything definite!

laura


Hi Laura

There is a pattern extant from 1655 which technique wise is probably right and bang on for your date.

Have you got Richard Rutt's History of Hand Knitting? In the Appendices, he parses down the 'oldest extant English knitting pattern' which is for a pair of knit hose, from 1655-ish. If you haven't got it - PM me and I will scan it for you.

He says:

... The heel is made, as was often done in Tudor stockings, by folding the heel flap in half and casting off the two sides together so as to produce a short seam under the heel....


Now I'd have to attempt that to figure it out, so if you beat me to it tell us what happens as I'm not sure what that means til I try it!

He figures out the heel for you on p 241 - and as ever with Rutt, his description is clear enough for you to knit one from. The heel looks to me like a straightforward shaped common heel - even if it isn't, if you did that type of heel you would end up with a result that would look very like the 1655 one. I use the heel variations from Nancy Bush's 'Folk Socks' (Interweave Press, Colroado, US) so not sure if it's called summat different in British English as opposed to US English! Have a feeling it can also be called a 'square heel'?

As the Gunnister heels are gone, I decided to do this sort of heel, although I tend to make it on more stitches than some - around a third of the total no'. And I like a round toe - decs spaced evenly all around - the Rutt picture of the 1655 stocking (he's knitted it up from the pattern) doesn't show so you're on your own for the toes! I've seen that kind of shaping in hats so know they could do it!

Hope that's useful!

Apparently, some Scandinavian knitting patterns are very much like this 17thC pattern - they give you the fiddly bits but then say *Now make a toe* - because they assume everyone knows how to do it!

I should say the 1655 pattern comes from "The order how to knit a hose" printed in Natura Exenterata, or Nature Unbowelled, which Rutt says is a 'medical compendium printed in London in 1655.' Apparently the entire pattern is one sentence and these use 5 different words for 'purl'!!!! (Which shows you how much they liked purling!) Rutt reproduces the original but works out the heel for you in modern English making it easier to follow. I wish my knitting patterns had names like Nature Unbowelled!
Last edited by ViscontesseD'Asbeau on Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:54 am, edited 1 time in total.



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Postby sally » Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:53 am

ViscontesseD'Asbeau wrote:He says:

... The heel is made, as was often done in Tudor stockings, by folding the heel flap in half and casting off the two sides together so as to produce a short seam under the heel....


Now I'd have to attempt that to figure it out, so if you beat me to it tell us what happens as I'm not sure what that means til I try it!


If you had, say 20 stitches for your heel flap, you put them on two needles, fold it in half so that stitch one is next to stitch 20 and cast off two at a time. You get a seam of 10 stitches that way which makes a pouch with a seam under the heel, then you pick up all the way round and continue knitting the foot. Really easy to do, looks a bit odd to modern eyes though



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Postby ViscontesseD'Asbeau » Wed Apr 16, 2008 10:58 am

Ah thanks Sally I'll definitely attempt that at some point but this present pair, will stick with me common shaped heel! I'm thinking of knitting thrums into the heel to make it harder wearing - am spinnin g the wool for the heels on this pair separately, with an extra ply, but very fine and very worsted! The next pair I'll make different again - just to see what wears best, over time. Have any of you fellow knitsters any strategies for making them hard wearing without compromising the integrity of what you're doing?



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Postby sally » Wed Apr 16, 2008 11:03 am

there is evidence for darning and reknitting of heels, so I think they just mended as needed



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Postby laura » Wed Apr 16, 2008 11:03 am

1655 is about as mid-C17th as one could get! ;-) Brilliant!

I'll track down a copy of that Rutt book. Luckily I'm surrounded by good libraries and bookshops, so...

This "by folding the heel flap in half and casting off the two sides together so as to produce a short seam under the heel...." is the heel I was meaning.

I think I understand it and I think the crucial thing is to make the heel-flap quite a bit longer and wider than we're used to. I've read several different versions (and lost the references to the lot last year in a computer-disaster!), but the one I could visualise goes roughly:

Use about two-thirds of the stitches for the heel-flap
knit it longer than in modern patterns.
It is square at the end that's on the needles
Now find the middle stitch and graft the ones either side, then again, then again, joining it together until finally what used to be the first stitch on that row is now grafted to the last stitch. This shapes the heel.

Take a rectangle of paper, an envelope, or whatever. Write "front" on one short side and write A and B on the left and right corners. now fold it so A and B meet and you'll see it deforms the rest to make the turned heel.

If this is what happens and if it works as it does in my mind's eye then I like it a lot - it avoids that gaping you often get over the jutting-out ankle-bone that makes a weak point in the design. With this one it's straight knitting over that area and the picked-up stitches are further round and further forward, I think.

I have to knit this up really don't I?

A lot of the websites where I found description or discussion comment that the grafted 'seam' woudl be really uncomfortable but I don't think it would - as long as the dimensions are different from modern heels - because it would lie flat further forward, under the part of your foot that isn't weight-bearing.

I don't know what the heel you use is calle din modern British knitting but in my Gran's 1920s Weldon's booklet it is a Dutch heel, I think.
I have a lot of patterns for different toe-narrowings, including a stunning 1940s one which spirals round in eight lovely even spirals to make the narrowing!

That's a brilliant answer to my question - many thanks and I shall go off and find some spare needles and wool and see if I can play with this heel-seaming idea and if I can get it right then I'll post photos and details... I may be gone some time... [staggers off into blizzard, a la Capt Oates, clutching knitting]

laura



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Postby laura » Wed Apr 16, 2008 11:09 am

Thanks Sally - Do you have any photos of what it ought to look like in the finished version, please? It's always easier to aim for something you know what it looks like that to aim for something you think you know what it looks like, and what a terrible muddled sentence that was!

What are thrums, please?

My C19th stocking-knitting patterns through to my 1940s ones all recommend knitting the heel and toe with an extra strand of wool, so it's double-thickness.

Can you point me at the darning evidence, please, as that's another of my passions (note to self: get a life someday...). I was told that one is not permitted to darn as there is no evidence [haughty sniff], but have been cheerfully ignoring it on grounds of common sense combined with not knitting fast enough to replace my current stockings!

laura



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Postby sally » Wed Apr 16, 2008 11:23 am

laura wrote:Thanks Sally - Do you have any photos of what it ought to look like in the finished version, please? It's always easier to aim for something you know what it looks like that to aim for something you think you know what it looks like, and what a terrible muddled sentence that was!

What are thrums, please?

My C19th stocking-knitting patterns through to my 1940s ones all recommend knitting the heel and toe with an extra strand of wool, so it's double-thickness.

Can you point me at the darning evidence, please, as that's another of my passions (note to self: get a life someday...). I was told that one is not permitted to darn as there is no evidence [haughty sniff], but have been cheerfully ignoring it on grounds of common sense combined with not knitting fast enough to replace my current stockings!

laura


I'll see if I can remember where I thought I saw it, I'm pretty sure its not a figment f my imagination- but its a good thought, I might email a couple of the big collections and ask what exidence they have for darning on their textiles



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Postby sally » Wed Apr 16, 2008 11:48 am

Theres some references to darning linked to extant textiles here for example, not knitting but cloth in this case- but it does at least show that darns are known on early medieval textiles- I'll keep looking, I'm *sure* I have a knitting darn reference somewhere
http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~marc-ca ... itches.htm



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Postby Merlon. » Wed Apr 16, 2008 12:00 pm

The knitting pattern in Natura Exenterata is a single sentence covering three pages!!!
If people want I can try and transcribe it and post it here from my copy of the book



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Postby ViscontesseD'Asbeau » Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:10 pm

That'd be great, Merlon. I'll scan it for anyone interested, too. It's a much finer gauge piece of knitting than the Gunnister, but it is useful to read just to get the technique.

Rutt comments that the stockings as knitted from the 1655 pattern, are not entirely fantastic but probably worth it for the clocks.... However if you knit Gunnister from his description - they are well fitting and all the increases/decreases seem proportionate, although I found I had to continue decreasing ad infinitum down to the ankles, to make them fit. Oddly, the 1655 pattern reminds you to do this! Finding the only online charts for the Gunnister clocks to be inaccurate and inexplicably dumbed down from Rutt's description anyways, I ended up charting the Gunnister clocks last year, so will find a way to get that online, soon.

Next year I fancy a bash at the Eleanor of Toledo stockings - why? Because they're there! The photo in Rutt is so clear it should be easily chartable from a photo alone.

Gunnister is also easy to see in terms of %s - so you could easily take that pattern and scale it up/down accordingly. If anyone wants, I can put that pattern up here. I made a pair from Shetland wool last year and am now making some from Wensleydale.

The 1655 clock is also charted in Rutt's appendix as well as the handy 'translation' of the heel into more understandable language alongside the original pattern, so if anyone needs that just PM me. I feel a new website coming on...... :lol:

Sometimes worry about myself, spending so much time knitting the clothes from various corpses....

:lol:



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Postby Merlon. » Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:55 pm

Below is the longest sentence I have ever encountered in English!!
I think I have caught all the transcription errors but apologies if any have got through, it will be obvious why they might have.

The book contains Medicinal recipes, Angling instructions, Knitting instructions, Lace (cord) making and Horse breeding. A wide range of topics indeed

Natura Exenterata 1655 pages 417-419

The order how to knit a hose
First in the top it must be six score and twelve stiches wide, so work down ward, and take in at every four purles hard at the seam of the right hand Needle one stitch, and of the left hand Needle, leave a stitch between the seam, and then take in, and so work down until you have made four purles, and then begin the ham, and work up streight, neither widen nor streighten til you have made fourteen knots, and then widen out of both sides of your seam as you did before at every four purles, until you have wided seven stitches at a side, then work up plain, neither widen nor streighten till you have made fourteen knots then take in at every fifth mask a stitch of each side as you did before, til you have left but four and forty of every Needle, which amounteth to six score and twelve, and if it chance in the working of your final that your ham rise somewhat round, you must take in somewhat faster then is appointed here, that your final be not too big, and from your calf to the beginning of your clock amounteth unto seventy knots and so then divide your Needles into three equal parts, allowing upon your two heel Needles three stiches of each, more than upon your instep Needle, and then at the beginning of the right hand Needle of the heel make two turned stitches, and so work plain til you come at the latter end of the left hand Needle to the instep ward, and there make turned stitches again, and then knit plain round till you come again to your heel-needle, then make one purl at the begining of your heel-nedle, then take up a stitch betwen the two purls and work it plain, then the next stitch make a purl, and then the next stitch plain, then shrink two stitches into, and work till you xome to your left hand needle, then you must leave four stitches of your needle, and so shrink two together then cast up your third and make a knot, then widen a stitch and work it plain, and make a knot again, and so work your instep needle and so work plain one course round about, til you come to your right hand heel Needle, then make at the first stitch one purl, and knit a plain stitch again, and then take up a stitch and work that plain, next that cast up your thred and make a knotted stitch, and then work a plain stitch again, and take in two plain stitches into one, and so knit about til you come unto the left hand Needle within five stitches, then take two into one then make a purl, then work a plain stitch and take up a stitch and work it plain, and then work a purl, and so then work your instep needle, and then make a plain course round about of all three Needles, then make your purl again when you come to your right hand Needle, and then two plain stitches and then one purl, and so work til you come to your left hand Needle, with four stitches, then make a purl stitch, two plain stitches and one purl, and so work your instep-needle, and then a plaine course about til you cometo your right hand Needle again, then make a turned stitch, then one plain stitch, then up a stitch and make that a purl, then a plain stitch, then a purl, then a plain stitch, then take in two, and work about til you come to your left hand Needle, til you have left but six then shrink in two, then make a purl stitch, then knit plain again one stitch, then take up a stitch and makes that a purl, thn work a plain stitch, then make another purl, and so to your instep Needle, and knit a plain course round about, then when you come at your right Needle, make a purl, then a plain stitch, then a purl again, then a pain stitch again, then knit a plain again til you come at your left hand needle, til you have left five stitches, then you must make a purl stitch, then a plain stitch, then a purl stitch, then a plain stitch, then a purl stitch again, and so to your instep Needle, and then knit a plain course about til you come to your right hand Needle then a purl stitch, then a plain stitch, then take up a stitch, and make that a purl, and the two purls together then knit a plain stitch and make a purl again, then a plain stitch then knit two together, and so knit til you come to your left hand Needle, til you have but seven, then take two into one, then a purl stitch, then a plain stitch, then a purl stitch, then take up a stitch and make that a purl, so shall you have two purls together, then a plain stitch, then a purl again, then knit out your instep Needle, then a course about plain, then to your right side Needle, ad at the first stitch make a purl, then a plain stitch, then two purles together, then a plain stitch, then a purl again. And so to your left hand needle til you come to six stitches, and make a purl then a plain stitch, then two purls together, thena plain stitch til you come on your right hand needle, then make a purl, then a plain stitch, then a purl, then take up a plain stitch, then make a purl again, then a plain stitch, then a prl, then a plain stitch, then a purl, and knit two together, then knit to your left hand Needle, til you have but eight stitches, then take in two together, then make a purl, then a plain stitch, then a purl again, then take a plain stitch, then knit a purl again, then take up one and make a plain stitch, then knit a url again, then a plain stitch again then a purl, and to your instep Needle and so knit round about, neither widen not streiten til there be ten purls on the side Needles, and take off your two side Needles, three stitches of each, and put them upon your instep Needle, and then upon your two side nedles, knit up your heel til you have 54 purls taking in at every four purls a stitch from the purl on the right side, and leave a stitch between the the purl on the left side, and so take it in till you have but 28 stitches of each side, then upon your right hand you must work of 12 stitches with the purl and all, then take two stitches and loop one over another inward to he seam of your hose and so work plain till you come within two stitches of your seam and work them both into one stitch plain as they lye, and them knit your seam stitch, and your other two stitches next your seam stitch, must be looped outward from the seam, then work till you have but 18 stitches of a Needle, and knit two togethe, and so must you take in and bind at every other course till your binding stitches do meet, if you chance to have any odd stitches of one needle more then of thother, bind on those stitches and not of thother, then work till you come at your seame stitch, and so put both the right sides of your hose together of both your Needles, and take third needle, and work both those needles together on the wrong side, looping one stitch over another, as you do end a hose, then take two needles and take up all the knots on the wrong side next to the edge stitch, and so knit one complete plaine around your hose and at the second upon your side needles, you must at every fourth stitch take up a stitch and so must you do of both sides of your side needles, till you have seventy six and so take three at the point of your clock, at every course of stitch, of both sides till you have done 10 purles and these take in at every second course a stitch of each side till you have done twenty purles and so at every third course till you have other twenty

Finis


I shall now go and have a lie down




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