Dying Wool using Dylon Machine Dye??

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ger
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Dying Wool using Dylon Machine Dye??

Postby ger » Fri Oct 05, 2007 5:46 pm

Dying Wool using Dylon Machine Dye??
Will it work?
I have 7 metres in total of creamy white wool which I got from Bernie. I originally intended to use the dylon hand dye, but that proved more complicated than I had realised. :?

So, will dylon machine dye give a good result on white/creamish wool??


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Postby sally » Fri Oct 05, 2007 6:06 pm

First check that your wool will go in the washing machine, cut a strip off, measure it and chuck it in with your next wash at a lowish temp and see what happens.

If it is still ok after that, then yes, I find Dylon works fine but expect a paler shade than on cotton. Apparently the hand/cold dye will work in the machine too



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Postby Wina McPod » Fri Oct 05, 2007 6:24 pm

When I last tried, it was a complete disaster. Didn't take the colour at all.



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Postby Tuppence » Fri Oct 05, 2007 6:27 pm

as Sally says, once you've checked that the machine doesn't make the wool shrink / fall apart, you can use the dye, but you'll get a lighter shade.

How much lighter depends on all sorts of things like the thickness of the cloth, and to a certain extent it's weave. Also on the colour you're trying to dye it.

Unfortunately, you can't always guess whether it will work or not before you put it into the machine, as different cloths (meaning wools) will take the dye differently.


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Postby sally » Fri Oct 05, 2007 6:50 pm

You can also do a small test corner using a pinch of dye and a snippet of cloth (damp it all down in a bowl and microwave it), just to see what happens. It won't reflect the final colour well, but it can show up whether your wool takes colour evenly or patchily



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Postby ger » Fri Oct 05, 2007 9:05 pm

thanks for the replies guys.

I reckon I'll pick up some dylon dye, give it a bash and see what happens. I mean, what's the worst that could happen?? :wink:

I yhink it would be better to try and do somethinf with it, as oppossed to it lying arounf for another 6 months.

One more question. How appropriate is white/creamy wool? Historically i mean. Specifically 1470 ish. Or in general??


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Postby Calendula » Sat Oct 06, 2007 9:13 am

Why not use it as it is in case the dye ruins it? It's sheep-coloured!



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Postby Handbag » Sat Oct 06, 2007 10:16 am

get a couple/triple of boxes if you want a stronger colour. 7 meters is a lot to dye. it should be ok with shrinkage as it dyes at 40% and will work on a cooler wash in my experience.



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Postby Alice the Huswyf » Sat Oct 06, 2007 5:18 pm

I would NOT machine dye wool.

However you can get excellent results by hand-dying.

Machine wash the wool and spin it, then keep it in a sealed bin bag until you are ready to dye it. It must be evenly damp. This will strip dressing, pre-shrink your cloth and ready it for even take up of dye.

If you can get an old zinc baby bath (or even a plastic one) to work in, this is ideal and will take a double wool blanket in bulk without problem. Mix up several tins of hand dye, preferably much darker than the shade you want. You will also need to read the instructions with great care - some use large amounts of vinegar as a fixative instead if salt.

Prepare the mixture extra-strong and with as much fixative per tin as advised, then ignore the instructions - usually they say stir for 15 minutes and then leave to steep for 45. Instead stir, knead and turn over the fabric in the mixture for the whole hour. The colour doesn't actually set until towards the end of the hour, so squeezing dry a handful of cloth is nto a good indicator of the depth of shade you have achieved until about 50 minutes in. By moving the fabric for the whole period, not only are you getting even coverage, but working the dye deep intot he fibres to achieve greater depth and stickability. When the hour is over, drain* and return to the washing machine for another COOL wash cycle without detergent. This is far easier than hand rinsing until the mixture is clear. It MUST be cool and the fabric when spun must be stretched into shape and dried away from heat or direct light or the dye can change in patches.

If your fabric is pure wool, then you will get very good results, but I would not make them up into items that can run onto others - even commercially dyed wools can leach colour onto linings and other garments when wet - although I understand a rinse with saltwater can arrest this.

If your fabric is mixed wool and the other fibres take up the dye then the end effect is good - for instance nylon and lycra are excellent . BUT polyester won't take it at all and when dying polyester cotton it gives a white heathering effect where the cotton has taken up dye but the polyester components in the yarn have not. The problem is that even traders cannot always identify a mixed fibre if it is as low as 5% - or what the mix might be. Lycra is often used to stop sagging, but polyester is often used to improve wear.

It is a calculated risk, but one which often works out - but keep working the fabric through the solution for the whole hour - it is well worth the effort as you get very good, very even take up. YOur only problem may occur if you fibre mix is in separate yarns in the wool - ie alternating threads in alternate thicknesses for effect (ie the length I am contemplating dying). One might be wool, but the other might not, in which case my plain-looking fabric will be very attractive - but no use to me!

NOTE! DYE MARKS EVERYTHING IT TOUCHES.

You need to work slowly when turning the cloth to avoid splashing. I usually do it on a dark tiled floor, sitting on a short stool with the tub on the floor between me knees and usung rubber gloves. I also work with a clean cloth, a bowl of water and a roll of kitchen paper next to me to deal with splashes or drops immediately.

*When you have finished working the fabric, if you can lift the tub and contents to the sink safely alone (or better with help) pour out the dye mix slowly from the top over the rim of the short end of the tub until it is mostly out and then take the cloth out into the sink and press it out until it is possible to transfer it into a bin bag and then into the machine without drops and splashes. After the cool rinse run, do an empty hot run to clear any traces of dye from the machine and make your first load after the rinse a dark load for safety.

Edited in later: Dylon dye instructions state suitability of dye to use on wool as follows:

Multipurpose Dye (Small round tin, fix with salt / vinegar according to fabric type) - Suitable for wool
Hand Dye (in smaller card box) - Lighter shades on wool
Cold Water Dye (in small round tin, needs fixative sachet) - Lighter shades on wool
Wash & Dye (large foil sachet like a Calypso drink) - Not suitable for wool.
Machine Dye (in larger card box) - not suitable.

Wash and dye and Machine Dye may be unsuitable due to hot machine washing as much as chemical composotion - you might be making coloured felt using these!
Last edited by Alice the Huswyf on Tue Oct 09, 2007 11:38 am, edited 2 times in total.



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Postby janes-wardrobe » Sat Oct 06, 2007 10:30 pm

ger wrote:One more question. How appropriate is white/creamy wool? Historically i mean. Specifically 1470 ish. Or in general??


White wool is often used in liveries but rarely for ordinary clothing. There is a rather fetching Burgundian outfit in white that I remember but unfortunately I can't remember the reference. It is of course high status!

White is impractical as it shows dirt so is probably not the colour most people would wear as a general rule.

I've dyed wool with dylon using the 'cold water' method and I had patchy results - but I followed the instructions, I've also had extremely good results - I think it depends on the dye as well as the method. I think Alice the Huswyf has hit the nail on the head when she says to move it around for an hour. Though I think if you're going to that much effort you might as well get some proper dyestuffs and mordants and do the job properly!


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Postby Alice the Huswyf » Sun Oct 07, 2007 1:27 pm

The advice I give above is for the hot water hand dye tins - these can be used over heat (In which case keep it moving all t he time), but the instructions I give are for the hand-hot water version. You can use the over heat method, but you will get shrinkage to the point of felting depending on your wool type.

I have not used coldwater dyes on wool, which need not only salt but a fixitive packet as well.



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Postby janes-wardrobe » Sun Oct 07, 2007 9:11 pm

Now you mention it Alice - the stuff I did was the hot water dyes not the cold water ones - I've only ever used salt and never needed a fixative. Even so the green I dyed came out patchy and I must've somehow got some iron or something into the dyebath as it 'saddened' the colour and made a really rather nice olivey green - instead of the bottle green it had on the tin! The 'madonna blue' I bought was brilliant - and wierdly the wool I dyed took out every last trace of colour from the dyebath.

Still reckon if you're going to that much trouble you might as well talk to the Fishwyf - she is the expert at all things dying...


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Postby Alice the Huswyf » Mon Oct 08, 2007 10:51 am

While we are on the subject of colour alteration, whatever your base colour is determines your outcome - fine if you are dying cream fabric. You can overdye fabrics with success, but you have to work out in your head how it will look - rather like the colour wheel we all use at school when learning to mix colours. Blacks you attain will be natural blacks unless using the new Dylon big packets on linen or cotton in which case you will get an excellent but most unnatural flat black. Results vary according to fabric type. This is from my experience in overdying wool - and you will get variations as each attempt is something of an informed adventure so always dye more than you need!

Pale blanket pink can be taken to most colours, but you will olnly take it to yellow if you use a strong yellow. The end result will be warmed by the origianal tone.

Beige to mid natural brown ditto, but you will only achieve a mustard with strong yellow or a mustard brown, or varying shades of warm grey to black.

Pale blue can be taken to dark blue, greens and a burgundy or claret or a cold brown, or black.


Red
will only take to clarets, browns, black and tinged to orange with yellow - you can convert a scarlet into a madder red sometimes with strong yellow.

Aggressive pinks can be toned down to a red with red, claret with claret and sometimes with yellow or orange converted to a red. Adding blue will just make purple, adding brown will make an old fashioned pink-brown called puce (colour of the flea, not the hot pink we nowadays term it) Blue makes bright purple and of limited use, black will tone it down to a greyed magenta or black depeninding on use.

Yellow overdyed blue goes green. By the time you have used enough yellow to make it a maddona-blue shade, you might as well have bought more fabric. It will take all the warm tones - ie red, brown, green, mustard. Black is interesting.

Dark blues, can be tinged green with yellow or further darkened with back or navy, dark greens can sometimes be sent dark greened-blue, dark brown can be warmed with red, but basically the dark colours are not easy to overdye. Black does not overdye :twisted: .



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Re: Dying Wool using Dylon Machine Dye??

Postby Annie the Pedlar » Wed Mar 12, 2014 11:26 am

Resurecting this thread :o I've abandoned Dylon dyes - too many failures and am using Omega dyes. Fantastic results on anything I do in a catering stew pot on a hob but I need to dye 2m of wool fabric. (Need = my OH saying use up some of your stashed fabric so we can fit in a new toy (a band saw) in the garage and this wool is a foul pink.) So I want to use my washing machine. Anyone got any tips? My questions are - should I mix up the dye bath first and pour it into the machine and rinse off the metal drum before putting the wetted fabric in (the fabric mustn't get patchy). Then what cycle to do it on? I can do a 90 degree one. Too hot for the wool? I'm thinking not as I regularly simmer wool in my dyebaths. Will the dye take at a lower temerature? Then in previous comments you said use the longest wash. Which will that be? Where did I put my instruction leaflet? Etc Etc.
Annie


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Re: Dying Wool using Dylon Machine Dye??

Postby janes-wardrobe » Wed Mar 12, 2014 12:37 pm

I'm not sure it will do well in the washing machine, I'd be interested to hear your results.
I've been told that with acid dyes getting the temperature hot enough for long enough is key.
Then you need to ensure the wool isn't shocked (temperature wise) or it may go hard. The trick is, apparently, gradual changes in temperature.
Too much agitation and spinning too fast for too long will cause felting.


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Re: Dying Wool using Dylon Machine Dye??

Postby Alice the Huswyf » Mon Jun 16, 2014 1:38 pm

So saying, one of our group usually got good results dyeing large wool tent-curtains in the washing machine with dylon and little or no stress. I simply bow to her ability / luck.

But 2m is a bucket job - otherwise there isn't enough stuff in the machine to churn the fabric around to get even soakerage (yes I made that word up to fit the process, but you get my drift) and the VINEGAR fixative can't steep for long with the colour to penetrate the fibre.




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Re: Dying Wool using Dylon Machine Dye??

Postby frances » Mon Jun 16, 2014 9:51 pm

If you do not get the colour you want the first time you dye it you can always over-dye it. However there is only so much dye a fabric can absorb so you might find that using a second dye does not change the colour at all.

If you find that your fabric unravels easily then take up a hem (using a tacking stitch only) before you wash / dye it. This will stop huge amounts of unravelling and the threads getting themselves all knotted up.




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