Simple Blackwork Patterns

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lidimy
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Simple Blackwork Patterns

Post by lidimy »

Hey,

Does anyone know of any online resources for simple simple blackwork patterns suitable for cuffs and sleeves? Googling brings up plenty of works but they are all too complicated for me! Is there an easy way to create a blackwork effect with a simple pattern? How would I go about creating my own pattern?

Thanks in advance....

Lidi (:
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ViscontesseD'Asbeau
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Post by ViscontesseD'Asbeau »

Lidimy if you follow the link in the Scholehouse for the Needle, below, you might get some ideas?

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Post by lidimy »

... :D
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Post by mally ley »

Lidi
what date is your gown? Do I remember correctly that it is 1540s?

The scholehouse might be a bit late for you - earlier blackwork is more geometric, rather than free flowing patterns of flowers, fruit and birds, and also easier to do if you can bear the thread counting involved!

I'll try and sort out some links ...

Mally

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Post by lidimy »

No, was meant to be early 1530s, so I was thinking more geometric and grid like. I think swirly pea pods and the like may be a bit too advanced for me!

Thanks :D
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Post by Teagirl »

lidimy wrote:No, was meant to be early 1530s, so I was thinking more geometric and grid like. I think swirly pea pods and the like may be a bit too advanced for me!

Thanks :D
Linn Skinner's blackwork books are very good.

http://www.skinnersisters.com/blackwork/

She also offers a copy of Quentel, which was originally published in 1527-1529 so right in your time frame.

-Su
Prime practitioner of headology and purveyor of beads.

Tillerman Beads

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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

Thanks Su, but was kinda angling for something I could look at now so that I can be finished with blackworking by Sunday!

Is blanket stitch, if made in black thread, an OK look for blackwork? I can do this quickly and with relative ease, so if it's suitable it would be fantastic :D

Lidi :D
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ViscontesseD'Asbeau
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Post by ViscontesseD'Asbeau »

Stem stitch might be faster and look better? Not sure but that's what I'd do... I've got all winter to get my head round it, so will know more in a few weeks!

Apparently some of the Scholehouse patterns are reprints of ones found as far back as around the 1540s, so you might be OK.

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Post by Ellen Gethin »

Get some squared paper and draw out squares and hexagons - hexagons are especially good. You could make quite a good simple border like that.
You can use backstitch - anything that makes a solid line.
Try googling for Spanish Blackwork, too - that might bring up something useful.

I love blackwork, but I do 13thC.
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Post by lidimy »

VdA, I don't know what stem stitch is! :oops:

Hang about, I'll google it...

Alternatively look in bookmarked pages... and look what I found.. http://medieval.webcon.net.au/technique ... .html#stem


How would I work that stitch on cuffs? Do you mean to produce a line like Margaret Wyatt's cuffs?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Hans ... J._034.jpg

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Post by Ellen Gethin »

What you're looking to achieve is a pattern going round the cuffs (or wherever else) made up of squares, hexagons, or other geometric shapes, and the outline of the shapes should be in solid lines.
Often this is done by counting the threads of the cloth you are working on, if it's fairly coarse, so you go over the same number of threads for each stitch, making the pattern very even. So each square would have sides of 2 stitches, each stitch being over 2 threads of fabric, just as an example.
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Post by lidimy »

That could take some time then :o

It needs to be reversible BTW - so I guess back stitch is out?
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Post by Ellen Gethin »

It is possible to do a solid line on both sides of the material, but I forget what the name of the stitch is.
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Post by Sophia »

It is called Holbein Stitch or Double Running Stitch and there is a good explanation here.
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Post by lidimy »

That's interesting - I knew how to do that before I knew the name :wink:

Am quickly creating a Margaret Wyatt style cuff, all I have time for and it looks pretty fine! :D (if I say so myself) in fact, it's such a rewarding thing to do that I fear my shift will be smothered in it... :oops:

Oh well..

Lidi :D

(thanks for the link - bookmarked for future reference)
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