Realistic attempt

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'Banastre'
Posts: 118
Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 9:36 pm
Location: Darlington

Realistic attempt

Post by 'Banastre' »

Image

*massages hand* 4+ hours in Photoshop. Still with a trace of my normal style, but not quite as.. 'comicy'
"I've just written a very warm, bubbly character who has happy plans for her future. You'd like her. But I was writing it, I was thinking - she's gonna die." - Andy B.

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Zachos
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Post by Zachos »

What are you using to do the shading? Are you using multiple layers, or opaque brushes? It doesn't look like burn, but I could be wrong.

As for the image itself, try using some photo's as references: while most of it is great he seems to be severely lacking a forehead.

Keep it up.

Zac
Slowly realizing just how far is still to go.

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'Banastre'
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Location: Darlington

Post by 'Banastre' »

Each item is seperated onto layers (ie, one for skin, one for the belt ect). I just use an opacity of 56% and shade it that way.

Thanks for the advice :)
~Ban'
"I've just written a very warm, bubbly character who has happy plans for her future. You'd like her. But I was writing it, I was thinking - she's gonna die." - Andy B.

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Zachos
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Post by Zachos »

Instead of using seperate layers for different parts, try using layers as layers of shading. Use a blank background and copy your lineart (original drawing) onto another layer, deleting the white parts. Then create another layer underneath the lineart and block on the base colours. When you have done this you can select each colour using the magic select tool, which will mean that you will only draw within the boundrys of that selected block of colour.

Now create another layer above the "block colour" layer, and use it the block in the first shadow, or highlight layer. Create as many layers as you want to get in the right amount of highlights. When going for realistic, use more layers and more shades between the darkest and the lightest. Comic book-esque characters can usually cope with one or two shades/highlights.

One I did earlier: link
Slowly realizing just how far is still to go.

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'Banastre'
Posts: 118
Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2007 9:36 pm
Location: Darlington

Post by 'Banastre' »

Wow, thanks for the tip. You're good :)
"I've just written a very warm, bubbly character who has happy plans for her future. You'd like her. But I was writing it, I was thinking - she's gonna die." - Andy B.

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Helzbelz
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Post by Helzbelz »

Zachos wrote:Instead of using seperate layers for different parts, try using layers as layers of shading. Use a blank background and copy your lineart (original drawing) onto another layer, deleting the white parts. Then create another layer underneath the lineart and block on the base colours. When you have done this you can select each colour using the magic select tool, which will mean that you will only draw within the boundrys of that selected block of colour.

Now create another layer above the "block colour" layer, and use it the block in the first shadow, or highlight layer. Create as many layers as you want to get in the right amount of highlights. When going for realistic, use more layers and more shades between the darkest and the lightest. Comic book-esque characters can usually cope with one or two shades/highlights.

One I did earlier: link
Helz
"We are, each of us angels with only one wing; and we can only fly by embracing one another."

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