Food safe approval

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Fey
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Location: Shrewton

Food safe approval

Postby Fey » Thu Jun 15, 2006 3:18 pm

Hi everyone,

Does anyone know where I get pottery approved as 'food safe'?

Thanks,

Ash


Love me, love my curiosity


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Kate Tiler
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Postby Kate Tiler » Thu Jun 15, 2006 4:38 pm

You don't!

There are no legal 'trading standards' type guidelines for pottery - all you can do if you really, really want to is to submit examples of it for chemical analysis testing, which gets done quite a lot in the states, not so much here.

glazes which aren't approved for food use are usually the low fire, highly decorative ones, but with all glazes, its not the glaze itself but how it is fired that makes the difference - I use lead based glazes and fire them over and below the conditions which make them unstable - i.e I know where the 'safe' firing range is & stick to it.

A very simple test is to get something acidic, like a cut slice of lemon and lay it onto your fired glaze and observe the change, if any. But to get an official, 'food safe' label you would have to submit the pot to a chemist & get an official report, probably in the thousands...

The website to ask on is:

http://www.ceramics.org/cic/clayart/

or the clayart list as it is know - lots & lots of people have asked the same question before, so search for their answers!

http://lsv.ceramics.org/scripts/wa.exe?S1=clayart

gets you to a search page, but takes ages,

http://www.potters.org/categories.htm

is a mirror site where the topics are browsable, such as 'glazes - misc' which when you look at the page & use edit 'find in page' on your browser for the word 'food', finds topics such as:

http://www.potters.org/subject29536.htm

which has a discussion about limits of oxides in make it your self glazes.

I hope this gets you started!

In the short term, your best bet is to get a good potters supplier, ask them which of their glazes are food safe, & use them.

If you don't have a friendly potter's supplier, try:

http://www.bathpotters.co.uk/basebps.htm

Bath Potters - they have a good, knowledgable staff, very friendly & they do mix some of their own glazes that they sell.


http://www.katetiler.co.uk
http://www.companyofartisans.co.uk
"In art as in life everything is possible as long as it is based on love" Marc Chagall

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Kate Tiler
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Postby Kate Tiler » Thu Jun 15, 2006 4:43 pm

Just realised that you might be wanting early Anglo-saxon style unglazed pottery, which is another kettle of fish!

Make sure that the clay body you use is fired to it's full maturation rate or slightly higher, which will get it into it's natural vitrification point. This will help it to be less porous, so it will trap less food & bacteria.

In countries like India where unglazed pots are used all the time, they have regular festivals when all the pots are smashed and replaced! This I think is a very astute business method by the potters but also means that there is a limit to how long unglazed pots are cooked & eaten from.

I'm off for a while now but happy to continue this discussion if you want! (If I haven't 'tiggered' you too much...

love kate


http://www.katetiler.co.uk

http://www.companyofartisans.co.uk

"In art as in life everything is possible as long as it is based on love" Marc Chagall

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nathan
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Postby nathan » Thu Jun 22, 2006 12:50 pm

Kate Tiler wrote:(If I haven't 'tiggered' you too much...


Absoluteley impossible to be tiggered _too_ much Kate

Hugz
N.


http://www.conroidevey.co.uk
Beware of dragons, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup.

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Fey
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Location: Shrewton

Postby Fey » Tue Jun 27, 2006 9:59 am

Hi Kate,

Thanks for the information. The type of pottery I'm thinking about is Roman samian ware so it's quite a fine slip. I'll have a look around the websites that you gave me and see if there's anything.

Sally - I'll have a chat with them as well and work out just how expensive a chemical analysis would be and if it's worth it.

Cheers

Ash

p.s. didn't feel tiggered in the slightest!


Love me, love my curiosity


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