Mayne Bread?

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Lady Wolfshead
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Mayne Bread?

Postby Lady Wolfshead » Wed Jun 13, 2007 4:25 pm

Okay, this is likely a dumb question but does anyone know what "mayne" bread is? I've been randomly dipping into Extracts from the burgh records of Edinburgh and came across it in this:

9 April 1443.
Baxters. Mayne breid.
It is statute and ordainit that a baxter baik na mayne breid to sell fra hine furthwart, saiffing allenarly at Witsounday, Sanct Geillis messe, Yule, and Pasche; and that the said breid sall nocht be sauld at nane of the said festivall tymes bot endurand aucht days, that is to say begynnand at the evin of ilk ane of the said feists and endurand quhill that day awcht dayes, and gif any mayne breid be sauld any vther tyme it sall be chete, and the said baxteris sall nocht bake the said mayne forowtyn pase to be given to thame be the baillies. (Amang the auld leiffes.—Tr.)

From: 'Extracts from the Records: 1403-45', Extracts from the Records of the Burgh of Edinburgh: 1403-1528 (1869), pp. 1-8. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report ... mpid=58457. Date accessed: 13 June 2007.

It appears to be a bread only baked during certain festivals but in what way did it differ from normal bread and why was the sale of it restricted? All offerings gratefully received!




Lady Wolfshead
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Postby Lady Wolfshead » Thu Jun 14, 2007 2:45 pm

Hmm, that certainly sounds plausible. Thanks. :)



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gregory23b
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Postby gregory23b » Mon Jun 18, 2007 7:03 pm

Wonder if related to mainchet - 'hand bread' good quality bread rolls, ie another version of pandemain as Sally suggests. It might be an injunction to have too fine rolls at times other than said festivals.


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sally
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Postby sally » Mon Jun 18, 2007 7:24 pm

gregory23b wrote:Wonder if related to mainchet - 'hand bread' good quality bread rolls, ie another version of pandemain as Sally suggests. It might be an injunction to have too fine rolls at times other than said festivals.


Agreed, whatever the root word, thats how I read it



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gregory23b
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Postby gregory23b » Mon Jun 18, 2007 8:24 pm

Funny because manchet and pandemain are related very closely. both being better quality breads, whilst chete is the lesser sort. interesting stuff this food lark, eh Sally?


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Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

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sally
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Postby sally » Tue Jun 19, 2007 2:45 am

gregory23b wrote:Funny because manchet and pandemain are related very closely. both being better quality breads, whilst chete is the lesser sort. interesting stuff this food lark, eh Sally?


Possibly the whole thing is a response to the amount of time it took to bolt flour for the white breads as opposed to just sieving out the bulk of the bran for the chete, so it would be saying thats fair enough for the named occasions, but for the rest of the time the mostly white bread should be more than enough for those that want it, and would the bakers please concentrate on baking nice wholesome sustaining bread for the masses rather than making fussy bread for the few.



Lady Wolfshead
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Postby Lady Wolfshead » Tue Jun 19, 2007 1:17 pm

Having just re-read about the different types of bread in the medieval period and how they were made, the above sounds a reasonable take on the above passage. In the unlikely event that I come across anything that contradicts it I'll let you both know. :)




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