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Dumplings

Posted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 5:16 pm
by Lady Wolfshead
Okay, never made dumplings before but want to learn 'cos I'm bored making the same stuff for events. :)

So, I was hoping someone might have some simple recipes/recommendations for how to make them authentically. Also, am I right in thinking they would be fine for early 14th century?

Re: Dumplings

Posted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 8:40 pm
by Karen Larsdatter
I found a few dumpling recipes in Sabrina Welserin's cookbook -- but that's much later than you're looking for (1553).

Maybe it'd be better for me to ask -- what does "dumpling" mean to you? Here, a dumpling can range anywhere from a particularly thick rectangular noodle, a big round steamed lump of dough, or a dessert that's basically dough wrapped around fruit and either boiled or baked.

You can find some 14th century recipe sources at http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/wsnlinks/i ... &catid=699 too. :)

Posted: Wed Nov 15, 2006 9:07 pm
by sally
Don't see why dumplings shouldnt be right for most periods its just flour and suet mostly. Will be interesting to see what extant recipes turn up though

Posted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 11:40 am
by Lady Wolfshead
what does "dumpling" mean to you?


Think I'm probably talking about the big lump of steamed dough. I don't know if this would be correct but I'm looking for something to cook in a linen bag whilst making some form of pottage/soup 'cos we only have one decent pot in our society. (Please say if this would be perpetuating myths 'cos I don't want to do that.) :)

Posted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 1:29 pm
by m300572
'cos we only have one decent pot in our society.


Is this the re-enactment society or just Innerleithen?? :twisted:

Posted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 3:16 pm
by Uncle Bulgaria
In one of my many books, I have a recipe for steamed herb pudding - thats done in a linen bag over the pot rather than in the stew.

I'll troll though and let you know when I find it (off the top of my head i'm hoping it's in Kings Taste)

Posted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 3:30 pm
by Lady Wolfshead
Is this the re-enactment society or just Innerleithen??


Cheek! Innerleithen has two pots, our society merely owns one of them. :wink:

In one of my many books, I have a recipe for steamed herb pudding - thats done in a linen bag over the pot rather than in the stew.


Ooh, that sounds really nice. If you manage to find it, I'd definitely like to give that a go. Not heard of King's Taste, sounds like a good book I should add to my list of books to buy, do you have more details? :)

Posted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 3:48 pm
by m300572
Cheek! Innerleithen has two pots


Its come up in the world over the last 20 years then!!

I'd have thought the general idea either of the boiled dough lumps in the stew or a bag pudding/clootie dumpling type boil in the bag pudding would be fine. From memory (I'd need to check) the Romans had dumpling type things and its a fairly simple way of cooking an entire meal in one pot. Given that the standard bulk carbohydrate was flour based then its good for most periods, up until the 18th C when the potato started to make inroads as the staple.

Twould be worth trying them out on the stove at home before you do them at a living history - allows the techniques to be honed without the added pressure of an audience (although the cat might give you a supercilious look if it al goes wrong!)

Regards

Peter (grew up in Biggar, my Dad used to make forays to Innerleithen and Walkerburn to cure their sick animals - he was the Mac in Armac vets if you take your pets/children to the vet in Peebles)

Posted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 1:32 pm
by Lady Wolfshead
grew up in Biggar, my Dad used to make forays to Innerleithen and Walkerburn to cure their sick animals - he was the Mac in Armac vets if you take your pets/children to the vet in Peebles


Cool. Don't have pets or children but I'll have a look out for Armac next time I'm in Peebles. :)

Was planning to experiment at home first with the dumplings as I have an entire winter (that will somehow pass all too quickly) to perfect lots of different culinery delights before next season. Plus I've learnt my lesson from previous attempts to try new stuff out whilst members of the public (and instant experts on medieval cookery!?) are present :oops:

Posted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 2:20 pm
by ScorchUK
Well, dumplings are easy to make, and it wouldn't surprise me to hear they've been around a very long while.

To make 'em, take some flour and add half as much (by weight) grated suet (or any grated fat), a pinch of salt and a shake of pepper. Modern mixes use self-raising four, and/or a pink of baking pwder too. Add herbs if you want to. Mix the ingredients up with cold water till they form a soft, sticky dough.
Then either drop tablespoon-sized balls of dough on top of your stew, cover & cook, or steam them by plopping them onto a mesh or stretched cloth in the steam over the stew (or boiling awater or pot of veg) covered to keep the steam in. Either way, they cook in about 20 minutes or so. The steamed ones are drier and fluffier, while the ones on the stew are squidgy at the bottom.
Yummy...

Posted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 2:25 pm
by Miel
If you like dumplings, why not try a "Duff".

This is a "Miel Special Duff" for your enjoyment.

Take self raising flour (as much as you need but start with a pound bag) and half the weight of the flour in minced suet (Atora from the supermarket is the best).

Add sugar to taste.

Add as little water as possible (really little) to enable you to kneed it into a stiff dough.

Now add stuff like dates, raisins, dried fruit, marmalade, etc. to taste.

Roll it into a ball and, very loosely as the ball expands while cooking, wrap it in a cotton cloth. Knot the cloth at the top so you can carry it like a sling. I tie a bit of string round the top so I can easily recover it from the pot by leaving the string hanging over the side.

Put it in a pot of boiling water with a lid (keep it covered with the water) on the camp fire and just simmer it all day (yes ALL day). Top up the water as it steams away.

Simple, delicious, and just wonderful at the end of a days hard graft.

Mark 11:
If you want, leave out the sugar and fruit etc. and cook it exactly the same way. Then serve it up with hot syrup (and custard if you like).

Mark 111:
Same as mark 11 but press the dough out flat into a big circle. Then put steak and kidney in the middle together with some onions and fold the dough over the mixture and roll it in to ball. You will need a little water on the seams to get them to stick.

Cook it the same way - again all day.


Oh, I forgot to say - the calorie count starts at about 2000 per portion.

That's why it has been so popular in early periods and times of hardship. It fills you up at little cost.

Posted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 8:33 pm
by Sophia
Don't know if this would be accurate for period, but in the Jewish tradition there are a whole series of dumpling recipes which are made by separating egg yolks and whites.

The yolks are then beaten with poultry fat or oil and a suitable amount of flour, ground matzahs (unleavened bread for Passover) or ground almonds in added.

The stiffly beaten egg whites are then folded in. You then add the mixture to the pot either as one big dumpling or lots of small ones.

Consistency depend on the quantities of egg, fat and flour - you can also add stock. Ideally they should be light and absorb flavour from the stock or stew they are cooked in.

I am not at home at the moment so can't dig out a precise recipe but will look when I am and post back.

Sophia :D