Recipes

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amlea65
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Recipes

Postby amlea65 » Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:40 pm

I know this is probably old hat to most of you, but I am looking for some good, fool-proof recipes that I can make around a camp fire. Fool-proof because I haven't cooked on an open fire before so I want to try some out over the off-season.
Any hints are welcome.


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Sophia
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Postby Sophia » Sun Oct 08, 2006 2:39 pm

Start by trying to make a throw everything in the pot stew. Exactly same type of ingredients as you might use for a modern stew - stewing beef, onions, carrots, turnips, leeks, maybe some pre-cooked beans, booze (wine, beer or cider according to your status), herbs, salt and pepper.

Only difference is that you don't fry anything off before hand. You can even do this with a pot roasting joint (slightly less liquid). Once have brought to the boil in your cauldron keep fire going with more coals than flame and stir occasionally. Will take between two and three hours depending on how big cauldron is. If you are using a ceramic cauldron it will take longer and you must be very careful not to let any flames touch the cauldron as it could explode.

Generally need to start by 9.00 am if you are intending to eat at lunchtime - alternatively anytime during the morning for an early evening meal. The advantage of this type of dish is it only needs stirring occasionally and the longer it cooks the better.

Also suggest you talk to other people in your group for their favoured recipes - some people are really quite adventurous in what they cook.

Also, remember that there were no potatoes at this period or sweet peppers.

Good cookbooks to buy:

"Plain Delit", Hieatt et al.
"Take a thousand eggs or more", C. Renfrow

If you have a decent skillet you can also experiment with griddle cake recipes.

Sophia :D



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Vicky
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Re: Recipes

Postby Vicky » Sun Oct 08, 2006 3:36 pm

amlea65 wrote:I know this is probably old hat to most of you, but I am looking for some good, fool-proof recipes that I can make around a camp fire. Fool-proof because I haven't cooked on an open fire before so I want to try some out over the off-season.
Any hints are welcome.


What period do you do? :)



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amlea65
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Postby amlea65 » Tue Oct 10, 2006 8:21 am

I'm doing WotR. I have looked up to see what type of veg, etc. to avoid - like pots and toms. I know lots of lentils and pulses were used but i need some recipes as I'm not used to cooking with them.


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Postby Vicky » Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:04 pm

Righty-ho - didn't like to assume.

The other question is one of status - different ingredients (spices etc) are available according to your wealth. I'll assume you're wanting 'ordinary common people' - do correct me if that's wrong.

There are lots of published late medieval recipe collections, including the 2 that Sophia mentioned - and several others. For a specifically English one - an Ordinance of Pottage is good.

Be aware of costs of ingredients and omit/replace spices etc according to your status (by the nature of the fact these recipes are written down, most are pretty 'posh'.)

However, to get you started, there are quite a few recipe collections on the internet. Just be careful to look for where they originally came from and stick to the Northern European ingredients!

http://www.yorkcitylevy.com/modules.php?name=Recipes

http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/cariadoc/recipe_toc.html (though a lot of these are non-European)

I know there are others online - have a Google!

Of course, these don't tell you how to do it over a camp fire - which has it's own limitations, but is pretty easy. My advice is to keep it simple. Know how many cooking vessels and how much space you'll have on the fire, and choose recipes which can all be done in as few pots as possible. Many recipes can be done in one pot quite happily, particularly pottage-type dishes. Many recipes also have relatively few ingredients - pea pottages, 'greens' type pottages (cabbages, leeks etc), and are often better (and tastier) kept simple.

Also, be aware of the limitations of your pot - as Sophia says, you can be a lot less careful with metal ones than pottery.

Good luck!



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Postby Karen Larsdatter » Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:16 pm

Recipes & cookbooks from the 15th century: http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/wsnlinks/i ... &catid=700
Recipes & cookbooks from England: http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/wsnlinks/i ... &catid=709



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Postby Cat » Tue Oct 10, 2006 8:38 pm

Or you could go for a logical 'one pot' cook-up, where you are boiling a smallish piece of meat in broth (add barley before the end of the cook), give it a good loooong cook with some chopped roots (carrot, parsnip) and some salt and onion and herbs, in the top of the pot have a boiled savoury flour pudding cooking in a pudding cloth. At eat-time everybody gets a slab of the pud (think dumplin') and some of the broth, then a bit of the meat to finish.

This is more realistic than posh dishes, lots of cheese etc! It can taste very good, particularly if you slip some illegal wine into the cooking water...
Marting Cowlers did a good chicken one with wine, I recall.


http://www.blood.co.uk. You get biscuits and everything.
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Postby Sophia » Tue Oct 10, 2006 11:22 pm

Excellent suggestion Cat. A small piece of Brisket would do this nicely. Remove the modern elastic at home and replace with coarse linen thread and Bob's your uncle so to speak.

Sophia :D



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Postby amlea65 » Thu Oct 12, 2006 7:36 am

Thanks for all the info.
I now have a few good recipes to try out over Winter.


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Postby Sophia » Sat Oct 14, 2006 1:04 am

On the beans and pulses front - brown lentils, green lentils, white lentils, dire peas, chickpeas, borlotti beans, cannelini beans, black-eye beans and haricot beans are all to my knowledge authentic. Not sure what status of pinto beans and kidney beans is and pretty certain that aduki beans and mung beans are not acceptable. Also fairly sure that small red split lentils not right either. If you come across a very nice lady called Julie from The Pelican in her Piety (MSS) she will know as she is a food specialist, uinfortunately she doesn't post as far as I know.

All of them if purchased dried will need pre-soaking overnight and the beans and chickpeas will need pre-cooking for several hours. What I do is either pre-cook them at home and bring them with (they can travel in a tupperware and be transfered to an earthenware bowl in the privacy of your tent) or bring tins of pre-cooked beans in salt water (Sainsburys is a good source - use same transfer trick).

That way you can avoid the embarrassment of undercooked beans and pulses - also recommend this if using dinkel or gruenkern (unhulled spelt grains or green hulled and parched spelt) as your grain. Pearl barley on the other hand will do relatively fast though I tend to put in about an hour before serving.

Other people bulk out their pottage with brown bread crumbs or very fine oatmeal.

Happy cooking,

Sophia :D



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Postby chrisanson » Sat Oct 14, 2006 10:41 am

I am finding this thread very interesting, please keep it going.
chris



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Postby gregory23b » Sun Oct 15, 2006 10:21 pm

Stir Yt well: English, 15thc, lots of recipes not all post.

Puddings: sausages (something I want to do Vicky!!!), stuffed in the morning, cooked in broth by lunchtime, lots of fillings, meat, herbs, bread etc.

Fried eggs

Boiled eggs

Pancakes (or whatever they are really called).


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Postby Vicky » Tue Oct 24, 2006 4:47 pm

Sophia wrote:On the beans and pulses front - brown lentils, green lentils, white lentils, dire peas, chickpeas, borlotti beans, cannelini beans, black-eye beans and haricot beans are all to my knowledge authentic.


Be careful, Phaseolus beans are New World. Stick to faba/fava beans instead which are related to the pea - basically field beans if you can get them (they're only really grown in scale for livestock feed now, but some health food shops sell them). Broad beans are also fava beans, only bigger and greener than the field varieties.



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Postby Vicky » Tue Oct 24, 2006 4:56 pm

gregory23b wrote:Stir Yt well: English, 15thc, ).


Oh yes, I wouldn't mind having that book back one day! :roll:

gregory23b wrote:Puddings: sausages (something I want to do Vicky!!!), stuffed in the morning, cooked in broth by lunchtime, lots of fillings, meat, herbs, bread etc.


Doesn't surprise me - I can just see you up to your elbow in intestine! :twisted:



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Postby Sophia » Tue Oct 24, 2006 6:30 pm

Vicky wrote:
Sophia wrote:On the beans and pulses front - brown lentils, green lentils, white lentils, dire peas, chickpeas, borlotti beans, cannelini beans, black-eye beans and haricot beans are all to my knowledge authentic.


Be careful, Phaseolus beans are New World. Stick to faba/fava beans instead which are related to the pea - basically field beans if you can get them (they're only really grown in scale for livestock feed now, but some health food shops sell them). Broad beans are also fava beans, only bigger and greener than the field varieties.


For those who like me don't know their different bean types could consult the following links:

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/rhodcv/hort410/peas/pe00003.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fava_bean

Will try and get hold of a pre-1500 bean list from somewhere to help us all out.

Sophia :D



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Postby William » Tue Oct 24, 2006 6:45 pm

Vicky wrote:Stick to faba/fava beans


There you go. That is your pre 1500 list of beans. Field beans/broad beans.



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Postby Sophia » Tue Oct 24, 2006 8:28 pm

I seem to remember discussing this with someone a while back and the actual list of beans is considerably larger than that. Fava beans covers a multitude of sins after all if you get the right beans to do Egyptian Fouls Mesdams you definitely haven't got English Broad Beans either fresh or dried.

I think the person I spoke to was Julie from Pelican in her Piety but not sure. I also have a friend who has the Wilson book on the history of food and drink - now I have returned it to her :oops:

Sophia :D

Further bean links:

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/PLANTanswers/publications/vegetabletravelers/beans.html



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Postby gregory23b » Wed Oct 25, 2006 8:37 pm

Italians had millet, can't recall if imported.

Some rice was imported, sticky stuff wasn't it Vicky.

Oh you will get it back, but not necessarily in the form you expect.

Up to my elbows in intestine, fisting they call it.


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