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Emeles

Posted: Tue Jul 30, 2019 11:12 am
by nest
Hi there,
I recently made these and am curious as to the pronounciation of "Emeles". Would it be 2 or 3 syllables?
Grateful for any info.
Many thank.
nest


A fritur þat hatte emeles

Nym sucre, salt, & alemauns & bred, & grind am togedre; & soþþen do of ayren. & soþþen nim grece oþur botere oþur oyle, and soþþen nim a dihs, & smeore heom; & soþþen nym bliue, & cose wiþ sucre drue: & þis beoþ þin cyueles in leynten ase in oþur time.

Re: Emeles

Posted: Tue Jul 30, 2019 1:49 pm
by Brother Ranulf
It's an obscure variant form of almandes or almaundes, meaning almonds. It has three syllables, with the emphasis on the middle one.

Re: Emeles

Posted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 1:41 pm
by nest
Thank you very much for your response, Brother Ranulf.
regards
nest

Re: Emeles

Posted: Sun Aug 18, 2019 11:17 am
by Alic
Fascinating - I have some ground almonds in the cupboard looking for a purpose in life. I will try the recipe. May I ask (not meaning to sound impertinent, Brother Ranulf), how do you know the pronunciation? Is it deduced from rhyme/metre in poetry or are there contemporary sources which explain it?

Re: Emeles

Posted: Wed Aug 21, 2019 9:37 am
by Brother Ranulf
Middle English pronunciation is a very complex subject and has been the subject of scholarly research for a very long time. It helps to have studied Old English and various Germanic languages, since there are strong connections but with some evolution in vowel sounds during the period when Middle English was in use (roughly 1150 to 1450).

If you know what a shwa is (a neutral vowel sound somewhere between a, e, I ,o and u), this is the usual value of e at the end of Middle English words. It gradually dropped from the language from the late 1300s (beginning the transition to Early Modern English). This website illustrates the complexities involved and traces changes in pronunciation over time:

https://www.uni-due.de/SHE/HE_DialectsM ... nology.htm

Re: Emeles

Posted: Wed Aug 21, 2019 12:36 pm
by Alic
Goodness me. Thank you for the link - fascinating (but difficult!) - no wonder the spelling of English is so idiosyncratic.