Medieval bread recipes

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craig1459
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Medieval bread recipes

Post by craig1459 »

Hi
Has anyone got some recipes for distinctive medieval bread that I can just chuck in the bread maker (yes yes I'm cheating)

Cheers :D
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sally
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Post by sally »

try half barley half rye or wheat flour, and use ale instead of water. Works pretty well in a machine and has a good medieval taste

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craig1459
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Post by craig1459 »

Thanks Sally - that looks good :)

Which also reminds me - I should look at my Gareth the Baker books :oops:
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Post by gregory23b »

"nd has a good medieval taste"

Sally is obviously older than she looks, ;-)
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Post by m300572 »

distinctive medieval bread
Wholemeal bread recipe, use some rye flour to substitute for wheat, and for a truly authentic medieval experience mix some mud into the dough! :shock:

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Mark GRaves
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Post by Mark GRaves »

Buy a bag of "Doves Farm" spelt* flour - recipe for roman army bread on the pack.

*anceiet strain of wheat.

easy to make - no kneading or knocking back, short proving time (30 mins) but it does say that it's not breadmaker friendly.

Stocked by some supermarkets.

m.
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Vicky
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Post by Vicky »

For 'medieval' I wouldn't use spelt. Ordinary bread wheat is closer (Triticum aestivum) - and the closest you can get is probably the organic stuff as the varieties often don't have the semi-dwarfing allele in them that most high production varieties have (but even these were bred in the 1960s, so hardly medieval!).
Some medieval wheat was rivet wheat (Triticum turgidum), but this is pretty much impossible to get.

I'd say go for the wheat/rye mix (rye was cheaper to grow - doesn't need the high fertile soils as much as wheat), increasing the proportion of rye for cheaper breads, and using stoneground, wholemeal for the wheat part.
I'd save the barley for brewing!

I mix the dough in the breadmaker, but take it out to bake. You could even check the Assize of Bread to get the correct weight of loaf for penny loaves! :wink:

Yes, I am a wheat geek. :oops:

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Post by craig1459 »

Vicky wrote: Yes, I am a wheat geek. :oops:
Thanks Vicky and others. Some good stuff here. Our usual breadmaker is off this weekend so I thought I'd give it a crack

Sara did her masters in crop protection so I know what you're on about :lol:
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Post by Vicky »

craig1459 wrote: Sara did her masters in crop protection so I know what you're on about :lol:
Yay, I did one of those too! :lol: But then I didn't know when to stop... :roll: :oops:

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Post by craig1459 »

She did a placement at Rothamstead and her masters at Long Ashton. But after a break in business is now back teaching biology :oops: :lol:
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Post by John Waller »

Don't forget to add a handfull of grit.
Those who live by the sword get shot by those who don't.

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Post by Lindsay »

Also add just a hint of LSD for an authentic Ergot Style Hallucination! :twisted:
Historians did it in the past.

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Post by craig1459 »

:lol:

I made a couple of bara briths using Old Peculier instead of tea mmm
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Post by Tamsin Lewis »

Bara Brith sounds fab!
but how do you recreate the woodsmoke smell with a breadmaker?

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craig1459
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Post by craig1459 »

Leave it next to the campfire all day :D
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Post by Tamsin Lewis »

that'd do it

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Post by Sophia »

Most important thing is don't use modern yeast - need to move to sourdough as "barm"was only really used for cakes at this time.

I make my sourdough starter by mixing rye flour and water, covering it with a cloth and keeping in a shady corner of kitchen. Should be fed with a little more flour and water daily. If successful will start to ferment but smell slightly sour.

Ready after about 7 days. Use to make a sponge to start your bread dough off. Remember that this is a slower method than modern yeast and benefits from extended proving time in front of Aga's or in airing cupboards.

You can use any sort of flour (rye is simply my preferred choice for a starter) for the bread. Recommend anything from the Dove's Farm Range for the beginner.

Don't forget to keep some dough back to create the starter for the next batch. If you are organised this can encourage you to make your own bread once a week - useful for the busy re-enactor who needs authenti bread.

Sophia

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Post by Heloise »

Just to add, in my experience the starter can be kept loosely covered at the back of the fridge. It doesn't mind a bit of neglect so then you only need to feed it flour and water perhaps once a week. When you want to use it you just take it out a few hours early, feed it, leave it uncovered in the kitchen and wait for it to froth. Also it may well develop a liquid layer ('hooch') which can either be stirred in or thrown away depending on how runny you want your starter.

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Post by gregory23b »

ah ha a link to info and a pic of gjetost

http://www.hormel.com/kitchen/glossary.asp?id=33792
middle english dictionary

Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

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