Medieval cookery books?

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nest
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Medieval cookery books?

Postby nest » Fri Jul 08, 2011 4:37 pm

Hi, I'd like to learn more about medieval food and wondered if anyone could recommend any recipe or reference books?

TIA
Nest



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gregory23b
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby gregory23b » Fri Jul 08, 2011 5:03 pm

http://www.tudorcook.co.uk/

http://culinaryhistory.org/english.html

Forme of Cury - http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/foc/

Cury on Inglische - Early English Text Society

Stir yt Well - Edited by Delia Smith

The booke of cookery by Pynson

The above is just for starters ;-)


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http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

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nest
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby nest » Fri Jul 08, 2011 8:08 pm

Thank you very much!
Nest



Ormsweird
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby Ormsweird » Sun Jul 17, 2011 12:43 pm

http://www.godecookery.com/ is also a good place to start.

There are a number of 'starter' cook books that are also quite popular:

Pleyn Delit: ISBN-10: 0802076327
Medieval Kitchen: ISBN-10: 0226706850

Hope this helps!



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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby Alexander » Tue Jul 19, 2011 8:36 am

I can recommend The Art of Cookery in the Middle Ages by Terence Scully. It focuses on the upper class and late medieval period but mainly because that's most of the original sources are from that period and class. The poor didn't have cooking books and only larger households kept written records of what ingredients were bought. It's not a recipy book but it's a book about food and cooking in medieval times. It tells about the relation food has with Humoralism and how that would affect seasonings and diet. It explains the various periods of lean days and what food could be served then. Furthermore it tells why certain foods became in fashion and explaind things like conspicuous consumption (..."Yes, I like these foreign spices. I've acquired the taste for it while I was in the Crusades..."). Another topic is etiquette and how a medieval banquet would have looked like.
gregory23b wrote:(...)
The above is just for starters ;-)

And what would you recommend for the main course?



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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby Langley » Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:30 am

Hi Nest, where are you based? We do a lot of Mediaeval cookery and are happy to share experience and recipes. with a name like Nest are you anywhere near Pembroke? We are there in a few weeks time and cooking will be high on the agenda. (Taught Stephen Hawking a recipe for garlic puree last year!) We have members scattered around West Midlands and Lady L and I are neat Heathrow. All the recommended books are great but nothing beats working with people and getting to taste stuff.



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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby Grymm » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:09 pm

Ormsweird wrote:http://www.godecookery.com/ is also a good place to start.

There are a number of 'starter' cook books that are also quite popular:

Pleyn Delit: ISBN-10: 0802076327


Hope this helps!



Not recommended, more medieval-17thC inspired than accurate.


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Grymm
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby Grymm » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:11 pm

Alexander wrote: how a medieval banquet would have looked like.



Sir sir Alexander used the B word........


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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby Alexander » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:24 pm

:sweat:



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gregory23b
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby gregory23b » Wed Jul 20, 2011 12:37 pm

KILL HIM!!! ;-)

Grymm jokes with you.

He is in a round about way saying that 'banquet' was an after feast sweet meat noshing affair. IE a table full of sugary delights for special guests after a feast.

A feast is what we now call banquets, although I think the terms might be more interchangeable from an earlier time.


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Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

"I know my place." Alice the Huswyf

nest
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby nest » Wed Jul 20, 2011 5:35 pm

Thanks for the further advice everyone, and apologies for the delay in posting them.( I blame work and too many last minute sewing projects)

I'm sadly nowhere near Pembroke, lovely place, though I do have a Welsh Mum, hence the user name.

It's a bit disconcerting to find that whilst the "B" word isn't allowed, the "F" word is perfectly acceptable :-)

Anyway...
I will definitely look at the books mentioned, my interest is pretty broad at present, I'm responsible for preparing lunch for a number of hungry archers am looking for something to liven up the usual fare of pottage (need to find some recipes rather than just slinging a load of veg in a pot), bread, cheese, ham and seasonal fruit. I'd also like to try at home some baking, both sweet and savoury and some higher class dishes.

The aspect of diet and food in relation to the humors sounds really facinating and is something that I shall look into.

I foresee my Amazon account taking a bit of a hammering.

Thanks again

Nest



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gregory23b
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby gregory23b » Wed Jul 20, 2011 6:08 pm

I think Grymm is having a joke. He does occasionally lapse into humour.


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Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby Grymm » Wed Jul 20, 2011 7:55 pm

Humour? Pah! Abominable muck and not enough of it!
So I shouldn't start on the P word as well then :wink:
Use banquet if y'like that way the punters'll understand and have a visual image* of what you're talking about, 's just me playing history food nerd......but it can be a handy discussion point that meal, feast and banquet mean seperate things, one's an everyday, one's a high days and holidays and the last is a nob special event possibly evolving from the wine and hippocras and/or the passing of the dragoir during the void.







*Albeit of people gnawing on bones and flinging them over their shoulders whilst quaffing horns of foaming mead....but it's a starting point.


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Grymm
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby Grymm » Wed Jul 20, 2011 7:59 pm

b**ger posted this on the vinager thread rather than here....nurse nurse he's out of bed again....

Forme of Cury turns up in google book (The 18thC reprint)
also here http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/foc/

Two fifteenth century cookbooks is worth looking for. I'm not a fan of modern redactions of historic recipes best read the originals and wing it from there, much more fun and with specialist spice and ingredient suppliers about it's easier to get grains of paradise and cubebs canelle and cinnamon, saunders, kid, veal gut for casings/puddings etc than it was even 10yrs ago.


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nest
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Re: Medieval cookery books?

Postby nest » Wed Jul 20, 2011 9:37 pm

The "P" word?

Do tell please!




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