Page 1 of 1

17th Century Sea Farers Jerky

Posted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 2:48 pm
by IanS
This is probably one for Martin but I’m thinking of trying to make a spice mix up to make authentic jerky for ships rations and was wandering if anyone had an idea of what herbs and spices I should use since I presume my usual mix of garlic and chilly with Soya sauce wouldn’t of exist back in 17th century on land let alone out at sea.

Re: 17th Century Sea Farers Jerky

Posted: Thu Apr 14, 2011 8:37 am
by Captain Reech
Depends on who the Sea Farers were I think, remember the Dutch East India company(VOC) had a trading base in Japan on Dejima from the mid 1600's and were well established in Jakarta by 1620. Pretty much all the impetus to develop these trade routes was down to the spice trade. Perhaps a perusal of some oth their bills of loading would give you an idea of what products were available?

The 'Biltong' of South Africa derives from recipes for preserving meat taken to Africa by the Dutch settlers in the 17th Century so that might be a good place to start (I work with a South African who makes his own Biltong and his basic recipe involves equal parts of whole coriander, black pepper, sea salt and brown sugar.)
I'm not sure when Soy sauce was introduced to Europe but I believe (source not confirmed by my own research) that the VOC first brought it to the Netherlands in the late 1730's (Various documents list 1738)

Re: 17th Century Sea Farers Jerky

Posted: Wed Jul 06, 2011 4:09 pm
by Martin
missed this lol, we use a recipe that's from 1804 in one of our jerkies, sea salt, cracked black pepper and a pinch of cayenne pepper, Im not sure there were recipes written down much as we haven't found many, I think you would have used what was available dried meat seems to have been something most people did but didnt bother writing it down cos they all did it lol

Re: 17th Century Sea Farers Jerky

Posted: Thu Jul 07, 2011 10:31 am
by IanS
Hi Martin & Cap Reech

Thanks for the reply. Out of interest I presume it would have been beef jerky on the boats rather than rabbit or Venison?

On another note just got a couple of venison steaks and wandering what would be a good spice mix for them. Was thinking keeping it simple and just using Salt & Black Pepper?

Re: 17th Century Sea Farers Jerky

Posted: Thu Jul 07, 2011 11:35 am
by Captain Reech
Salt pork seems to have been the flavour of choice with the British.

Not quoting an authentic recipe here, just playing with ingredients, but I did a couple of venison steaks the other day ground cubeb(long pepper), grains of paradise, black pepper corns and sea salt together, mixed it with some flour and coated the steaks, flash fried them to seal and then braised them in red wine with sliced onions. Very tasty, melt in the mouth texture and a thick gravy. Served with a carrot and baby turnip mash (butter, salt and pepper) and cabbage lightly fried in butter.

I feel hungry.....

Re: 17th Century Sea Farers Jerky

Posted: Thu Jul 07, 2011 11:39 am
by IanS
Sounds like a nice recipe :thumbup:
But I was thinking more of turning them into Jerky.

Re: 17th Century Sea Farers Jerky

Posted: Wed Aug 24, 2011 11:32 pm
by TriciaT
What was the process of making beef jerky back then? Did they hang the beef and let it dry on the ship? Or did they place the slices in salt to dry and cure it? I would think the jerky would either have no spices or whatever was common which could have been just pepper.