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Sourcing Cooking pans / Cauldrons

Posted: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:55 pm
by Frances Perry
I'm looking for suppliers of cauldrons / cooking pots suitable for 15th century re-enactment.

and

if anyone has one they wish to sell - but no old knock-off jam pans and witches pentagram cauldrons please!!!

Thanks for your help

Re: WLTB: Cooking pan / Cauldron

Posted: Sun Apr 10, 2011 7:41 pm
by James The Archer
http://www.historiccastings.co.uk/, could try here have some very nice looking bits of kit

Re: WLTB: Cooking pan / Cauldron

Posted: Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:16 pm
by bigrich72
http://www.greenleaf-workshop.co.uk/

Graham Makes Very Nice Couldrons and cooking pots.

Re: WLTB: Cooking pan / Cauldron

Posted: Mon Apr 11, 2011 12:11 pm
by Mark Griffin
Wayne at Past Links has made me a good range of skillets and pans

Past Lincs Historical Furniture: 75 Lincoln Road, Ruskington, Sleaford, Lincolnshire, NG34 9AR Tel: 01526 833 737. E-mail: pastlincs@aol.com

Re: Sourcing Cooking pans / Cauldrons

Posted: Mon Jul 18, 2011 4:53 pm
by Graham Ashford
Probably a little late to the game on this one, but thanks for the reference above.

Here's a couple of images of a recent cauldron in case it helps, this one was raised from a 14g (1.9mm) mild steel and is about 9 inches across (IIRC):

Image

Image

In case you can't see the images here's the gallery: http://www.greenleaf-workshop.co.uk/gallery/index.php

Re: Sourcing Cooking pans / Cauldrons

Posted: Tue Jul 19, 2011 11:34 am
by Langley
Frances - are you aware of the discussion on her from some time back about Cast Iron not being right for 15th C? Rivetted bronze or earthenware seemed to be the consensus.

Re: Sourcing Cooking pans / Cauldrons

Posted: Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:06 pm
by Grymm
Langley wrote:Frances - are you aware of the discussion on her from some time back about Cast Iron not being right for 15th C? Rivetted bronze or earthenware seemed to be the consensus.


Cast bronze is good too.

Re: Sourcing Cooking pans / Cauldrons

Posted: Thu Dec 01, 2011 12:48 pm
by r33nact0r
As a time-served metalsmith of 46 years standing, and an med reenactor, I have an interest in the production of steel which is made by re-melting pig iron. As part of the process, a certain amount of cast iron - in an undesirable form, but sometimes including a usable amount of "malleable" cast iron, is produced if temperatures, and the re-addition of carbon are not carefully controlled, along with Phosphorus and Sulphur which may be introduced as contaminants. In the 15C cast iron was itself seen as a contaminant and it's inherent strengths were not recognised. For this reason, cast iron was very rarely used. Instead, cast bronze was substituted when items such as cauldrons or cooking pans were required. Cast iron did not become popular until around the late 17C. I would be interested to hear the opinions of other craftsmen on this rather thorny subject. PS as a warning, please, if you have a bronze pot or cauldron, do not eat food from it, as there is a danger of verdigris poisoning from the copper content which can leach during heating: also there may be lead content, also very dangerous.

Re: Sourcing Cooking pans / Cauldrons

Posted: Fri Dec 02, 2011 10:19 pm
by Grymm
Bronze is potentially dangerous but keeping it clean and bright inside, scouring it well and finishing with an acid (vinager or lemon juice) a good rinse and thorough drying, helps minimise any risks as does never letting food cool in it, once cooked transfer to 'good pot'.
As someone who for the last 10yrs has been cooking and eating from bronze regularily (minimum of one weekend a month and frequently a week at a time) it's never done me any AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH THE SPIDERS! STOP THE SPIDERS! THEY'RE EATING MY BRAIN! harm.

Re: Sourcing Cooking pans / Cauldrons

Posted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 4:37 pm
by Mark Griffin
old knock-off jam pans


depends how old of course. I have a couple of originals I use for later eras and they are spot on. Post civil war, apart from slight changes in shape and how the handle attaches they match provenanced ones and pictorial sources.

Alternatively you can still get original bronze skillets for a good price.

But all need the Grymm method of cleaning or you get the same WEEEEEE DADDY I"M RIDING A LOBSTER!!!!!!!! effect.

Re: Sourcing Cooking pans / Cauldrons

Posted: Thu Dec 12, 2013 4:39 pm
by Mark Griffin