The Kedleston Medieval Garden

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KedlestonCraig
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The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby KedlestonCraig » Sat Oct 09, 2010 11:50 am

Check out our medieval garden project courtesy of Captain Reech and serfs

http://www.kedleston.org.uk

We want to bring a seasonal aspect to the group so that what we eat at events is appropriate to the time of year, and our Midlands location, so to drive that we have an allotment with a selection of appropriate vegetables. We've been able to use these at several events this year and hope to take it to bigger and better things next season. (and with more photos!)


I'm still alive - just spending time with my wife and daughter :-)

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Bittersweet
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Bittersweet » Sun Oct 10, 2010 7:18 am

Good luck with this gardening lark, I think it's a grand idea.
Don't forget to use a good crop rotation system as that seems to be one of the keys to ground improvement (I'm probably teaching granny to suck eggs here).


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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby gregory23b » Sun Oct 10, 2010 5:55 pm

Blimey, Craig, what a fantastic project, you are taking things to new levels or should that be depths.

Hats off.

Do keep us posted.


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Elenna DeVargr
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Elenna DeVargr » Mon Oct 11, 2010 5:14 pm

Captain Reech has been doing a lot of hard work on the allotment in all weathers and has achieved growing some bloody good veg. Next year when he's improved the soil we're hoping that the crops will be greater.

Well done darling :*



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Captain Reech
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Captain Reech » Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:10 pm

:$

<I blush>

Thanks for the encouragement, it's a work in progress so we're learning by trial, error and research (mostly error on my part this year!)
A very good point Bittersweet has made, the trick is rotating the crops so the right plants follow to best effect. The plan this year is to follow the pulses (Nitrogen fixing) with the greens and root crops, the fallow beds to be enhanced with manure and compost ready for the pulses and to follow the root crops with a fallow season(Green manure crops such as comfrey, borage and clover to be dug in in the off season.) Perennial pot herbs and soft fruit to be added (hopefully) as I get more confident.

Fingers crossed I've got the balance right and I'll be able to offer a continous and varied crop across next season (It won't be Turnips with everything!).


"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
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Captain Reech
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Captain Reech » Mon Oct 11, 2010 7:12 pm

(A quick PS!)

Elenna is taking charge of the edible and medicinal herbs so things will be tastier as well!


"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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Brother Ranulf
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Brother Ranulf » Tue Oct 12, 2010 11:20 am

Well done to everyone involved, that looks like a massive undertaking and a very worthwhile project.

The addition of all kinds of manure or compost material will make a big difference to your results - I am lucky to have a son and daughter-in-law with their own horse, so plenty of organic material constantly available. Another tip I picked up somewhere is to keep all the autumn leaves and compost them - in my case I store them in bin-bags punched with holes and watered occasionally to help them rot down, then dig them into the beds; if you can build proper compost heaps it's worth the trouble.

Congratulations and keep up the good work :thumbup:


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"Patres nostri et nos hanc insulam in brevi edomuimus in brevi nostris subdidimus legibus, nostris obsequiis mancipavimus" - Walter Espec 1138

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Captain Reech
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Captain Reech » Tue Oct 12, 2010 1:37 pm

Good tip on the leaf mould, I shall be giving that a go. ( It's a more socially acceptable idea than sneaking into the woods with a sack and an entrenching tool!)


"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Thu Oct 14, 2010 10:09 am

Captain Reech wrote: ( It's a more socially acceptable idea than sneaking into the woods with a sack and an entrenching tool!)


The mental picture that conjures up... :lol: :lol: :lol:
Commando Gardening :shifty: :coffee:



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Captain Reech
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Captain Reech » Thu Oct 14, 2010 1:16 pm

You've found out my secret Paul!
:lol:

I'll be gathering some wild seeds over the next few weeks and possibly a couple of damson saplings I've spotted in a hedgerow (On an old, disused, railway line so I shan't be removing anyones hedge I hasten to add!)


"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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Fox
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Fox » Thu Oct 14, 2010 2:24 pm

Captain Reech wrote:I'll be gathering some wild seeds over the next few weeks and possibly a couple of damson saplings I've spotted in a hedgerow

Now that is interesting direction to take it in.
More power to your elbow, I shall continue to watch with interest.



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Captain Reech
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Captain Reech » Fri Oct 15, 2010 7:45 am

We already have 'Goode King Henry' in the perennial patch but I'd like to add Sorrel and possibly a wild mustard to the brassicas. There's quite a lot of 'feral' parsnip growing around the allotments (The patch we are on had been out of cultivation for around 20 years) so I've been saving seed to see how it turns out in a properly composted and dug bed next year. There were also some patches of gooseberry bushes along the embankment, if they're the proper wild ones I'll have to see if I can propogate them.


"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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Fox
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Fox » Fri Oct 15, 2010 11:04 am

Captain Reech wrote:I'd like to add Sorrel

Oh. I like Sorrel.

We were spotted once sat in a re-enactment field (I forget where) picking it out the grass among the tents.
We didn't half get some funny looks.



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Brother Ranulf
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Brother Ranulf » Fri Oct 15, 2010 11:33 am

I read somewhere that it was eaten just like that by medieval harvesters in the fields to help prevent thirst - the young leaves are a bit like lemonade and quite juicy. I was going to say we grow it here, but it pretty much grows itself. It goes well with salmon and other fish but there are many other uses. A plant that isn't used enough today.


Brother Ranulf



"Patres nostri et nos hanc insulam in brevi edomuimus in brevi nostris subdidimus legibus, nostris obsequiis mancipavimus" - Walter Espec 1138

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Captain Reech
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Captain Reech » Fri Oct 15, 2010 4:29 pm

That's the kind of detail I'd like to add to LH displays Fox, a bit of a forage (Conditions on site and landowner allowing of course) for seasonal herbs, fruit or fungi (I have some experience here, not planning on poisoning anyone!) add a great deal to the cooking display for the public (and the experience for the re-enactors.)

Sorrel is a great herb for nibbling when working, it suppresses the feelings of hunger very nicely when there's a while to go between meals and freshens the mouth a treat when it's a bit dry. It has been used as a substitute for fruit (when nothing much is in season) and is very rich in vitamin C. Wood Sorrel (totally unrelated plant of course!) is also good but you have to be careful not to eat too much of either due to the high oxalic acid content (It's quite an effective diuretic as well!) but goes well with fish and cheese or in salads.


"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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KedlestonCraig
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby KedlestonCraig » Sun Oct 17, 2010 12:50 am

A second feral/foraging plot is also on the cards - obviously I'm a bit preoccupied at the moment to direct anything.


I'm still alive - just spending time with my wife and daughter :-)

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Christabel
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Christabel » Sun Oct 17, 2010 2:51 pm

This sounds brilliant. I just wanted to say be careful with the comfrey- I planted some and it's become a bit of a pest. The borage has seeded itself everywhere too but I don't mind that - it's gorgeous. I didn't know it was a green manure too, so thanks for that!



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Captain Reech
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Captain Reech » Mon Oct 18, 2010 7:48 am

You can't have too much Comfrey, It's the best compost maker there is! I appreciate it can get a bit unruly but you just have to dig up what you don't want and shove it in the compost heap and it makes the other stuff rot down a treat. Also makes a great mulch around your other plants, just pull the leaves and leave them lying on the surface. It keeps down the weeds and feed the soil.


"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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Fox
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Fox » Mon Oct 18, 2010 12:59 pm

Mixing human urine with either borage or comfrey helps make good plant food.
Don't let the uringe go stale; peeing straight into the compost bin is best.



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Captain Reech
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Captain Reech » Mon Oct 18, 2010 1:37 pm

Fox wrote: peeing straight into the compost bin is best.


may I add 'discretely' to that!


"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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Fox
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Re: The Kedleston Medieval Garden

Postby Fox » Mon Oct 18, 2010 1:53 pm

Captain Reech wrote:
Fox wrote: peeing straight into the compost bin is best.


may I add 'discretely' to that!

You can stand on the compost heap, in a spotlight, singing the national anthem, for all I care. :rofl:




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