Medieval snack?

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lidimy
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Medieval snack?

Post by lidimy »

On the side of my Shortbread box it says that shortbread has been a traditional Scottish treat since Medieval times.

As Medieval as tartan (oo-er) or is this a true statement? :D

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Annis
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Post by Annis »

I dunno, but I have a recipe for Celtic Shortbread.
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Eric the well read
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Post by Eric the well read »

I always thought Petit gautelle (sp) or petticoat tails were 18th. Somebody
here
http://www.historypoint.org/columns2.as ... =hpfeature

claims Mary queen of scots had a recipe for them????

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sally
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Post by sally »

Thinking logically, it must have only become popular after sugar came down in price to allow it as an everyday ingredient

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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

sally wrote:Thinking logically, it must have only become popular after sugar came down in price to allow it as an everyday ingredient
Well then. Didn't think of that...
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Hraefn
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Post by Hraefn »

Yup the medieval Scots traditionally kept shortbread in their sporrans, which they wore outside their tartan plaids, as a quick energy giving snack after hunting haggis with huge claymores...(DUCKS to avoid hail of abuse :) )
Seriously there is no evidence for shortbread in the medieval period in the whole of Britain and the earliest recipe I know of is 1594 in The Good Huswifes Handmaid printed in London So more of a middle class Elizabethan treat than a period snack.

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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

Uh oh... looks like a case for Trade Descriptions!

Twas from Sainsbury's btw.
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Post by Hraefn »

No just one of those legends that get told so often people accept them as fact and I see it as part of our job (us as 'nactors/historical interpreters/experimental archeologists/ funny dressed up weirdos)is too find out rather than just regurgitation the same ol' same ol', ARE YOU WITH ME BROTHERS AND SISTERS!.......Er, time for me medication again.

Nurse pills please, Hraefn.
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gregory23b
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Post by gregory23b »

Hraefn knows jack about historical food. :D except maybe how to stuff it into his cake hole.

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Hraefn
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Post by Hraefn »

Bit better now ta Jorge.
Er and by the way I know it doesn't say on the application no Portagee.........but er........................ :P
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gregory23b
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Post by gregory23b »

...no POrtagee :cry:


check yer pms btw.
middle english dictionary

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Post by m300572 »

What does 'short' actually mean in this context - if its short of something in the mix (or if its bread with added 'short' then the original may be medieval but not made to the same recipe as modern shortbread.
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Post by Cat »

Short normally refers to a highish amount of fat in the mix that makes the end producy crumbly and melty-in-the-mouth. Short-crust pastry is an example.
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