protecting armour from rust

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nickthegreek
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protecting armour from rust

Postby nickthegreek » Thu May 25, 2006 6:07 am

Hello Everyone,
pretty much what the title asks. How do you protect your steel helmet and body armour?
I have heard that heating up the steel and then rubbing on bees wax.
And rubbing sewing machine oil as another.

Nick



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craig1459
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Postby craig1459 » Thu May 25, 2006 7:48 am

I coat my kettle hat with a little bit of vegetable oil


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Tomm
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Postby Tomm » Thu May 25, 2006 7:53 am

cosmetic or technical vaseline is very good solution as well



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Steve Stocker
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Postby Steve Stocker » Thu May 25, 2006 8:07 am

Remember, if your armour has leather attached then don't use a mineral based oil as it will perish the leather.
Authentically I understand that animal fats - mutton etc - and vegetable - ie Olive - oils would have been available.


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Scraggles

Postby Scraggles » Thu May 25, 2006 8:25 am

some people buy blackened armor that is more resistant to rust

olive oil is good and can vouch for mineral oils perishing the leather, now only use olive oil :)



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DomT
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Postby DomT » Thu May 25, 2006 8:56 am

Traditionaly a mixture of Olive oil, wood ash and fine sand was used to clean armour.

I would imagine Olive Oil was more for the rich and yer average soldier might well use some other form of animal grease/oil.


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gregory23b
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Postby gregory23b » Thu May 25, 2006 12:35 pm

Boiled linseed oil and rosin varnish were also used, one recipe calls for the sallet to be put in an oven until very hot then have the varnish brushed over it 'until it stops bubbling', it then dries and is a varnish coat.

What is interesting this varnish is of a brownish cast in liquid but in thin layers over say iron/steel gives it a warmish yellow/gold tinge.....yes indeed. Which ties in with a few recipes to make tin look gold....


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kael
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Postby kael » Thu May 25, 2006 2:14 pm

A fine sand bock can be pretty useful for cleaning surface rust, and then a coat of oil or wax after a quick wipe down with water (to get rid of any dirt that gets trapped under the oil).

Linseed oil is pretty much all purpose. I use that to coat spear shafts...



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Postby guthrie » Thu May 25, 2006 5:51 pm

gregory23b wrote:Boiled linseed oil and rosin varnish were also used, one recipe calls for the sallet to be put in an oven until very hot then have the varnish brushed over it 'until it stops bubbling', it then dries and is a varnish coat.

What is interesting this varnish is of a brownish cast in liquid but in thin layers over say iron/steel gives it a warmish yellow/gold tinge.....yes indeed. Which ties in with a few recipes to make tin look gold....

You dont happen tohave a recipe/ reference for that do you? I am thinking of getting in to alchemy and that kind of armour proofing would be good to try in living history in front of people.



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Phil the Grips
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Postby Phil the Grips » Mon May 29, 2006 5:25 pm

Black hammerite liberally coated inside and out- works for all my low end kit and the inside of my top end kit which I let go "campaign finish"- a sort of brownish satin effect that doesn't get any worse after a while unless it gets rained on directly.


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mattb
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Postby mattb » Wed May 31, 2006 1:20 pm

I've found wax-oil or furniture wax(beeswax based), to both be very effective, they both dry and then buff up. i've found dust tends to stick to an oiled surface and looks manky very quick, while a friend of mine laquered his, after a few scraps the laquer was coming off and also discolouring.

One american armourer recently recommended clear turtle wax.



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saxon
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Postby saxon » Sun Jun 18, 2006 10:13 pm

Heat up the item of armour until it's a cherry red colour then quench it in urine !!!!!!!!!! blackens and rustproofs it for good !!!! but stinks !!!! :lol:



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craig1459
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Postby craig1459 » Sun Jun 18, 2006 10:50 pm

saxon wrote:Heat up the item of armour until it's a cherry red colour then quench it in urine !!!!!!!!!! blackens and rustproofs it for good !!!! but stinks !!!! :lol:


Skevmeister - did you get that? :D


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gregory23b
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Postby gregory23b » Mon Jun 19, 2006 8:36 am

Also olive oil with salt petre dissolved by heat in it, 15thC recipe.


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Rod Walker
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Postby Rod Walker » Mon Jun 19, 2006 3:47 pm

I use a beeswax and olive oil mix that I simply cook up on the stove.

Heat the olive oil up and melt the beeswax into it. When it cools down you end up with a paste that can be used on your armour, its leather straps, your swords, boots,,,,, just about anything.

Add some herbs to make it smell even nicer if you want.

I store and transport my harness in soft cloth bags in a chest. When I want to use it I pull it out, give it a quick wipe over and do the do. When finished, wipe it over and then start coating in the armour wax, (it lives in a small wooden box and the cloth sits in there with it) and then back in the bags.

I even use it on my mail voiders and standard.

It is the best stuff I have found to protect from moisture and rust and keep my harness nice and shiny.



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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Wed Jun 21, 2006 8:51 am

Hey I might try what Saxon suggested at Tewkesbury in frount of MOPs just to gauge the reaction. Cracking idea big man!


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Wayland2002

Postby Wayland2002 » Sun Oct 08, 2006 11:17 am

I spray mine with silicon, its stopped the worst of the rust now for 2 years.



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CeDeBe
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protecting armour from rust

Postby CeDeBe » Mon Oct 09, 2006 10:01 am

Adding to Gregory 23's post:

Leave metal in the sun until feels noticably warm - add raw linseed oil then leave in the open under the sun, will dry with a faint yellow tinge (is sticky untill completely dry)
Like a cheap varnish really!



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Postby m300572 » Mon Oct 09, 2006 11:00 am

Several years ago there was a team went in for the Nijmagan march as an assortment of Roman military types - they went for an authentic sollution to reduced the rust problem on their armour by using raw lanolin - the smell of sweaty armour, wool tunics and old sheep meant that no one would come near them after a couple of days!




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