Non- food related recipes

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gregory23b
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Non- food related recipes

Postby gregory23b » Tue Aug 23, 2005 11:36 am

Two recipes for softening horn for moulding.


From the Strasbourg manuscript - 15th century - original burned down but a transcript was taken in the 18th century, resides in BM Library.

The book is out of print.

However this is one of the most interesting recipes, two actually.

If you wish to learn how ot liquify horn as if it were lead, procure horns at the time of the year at shwihc they are shed from the animal and put them in a pot. Then tak some wood ashges 2 parts, lime 1 part in the pot and stir it with an iron spoon till it turns to pulp. Should you wish to make it red, take some red lead (powdered) and add it it to the horn, stirringthe whole together till it becomes red. Then run off the melted horn into amould and let it set. Then take some hen-bane root and grind it up fine and powder it over the horn to speed up drying and help to keep its shape. If you scrape it with a good scraper it will take a polish and you can make whatever you like out of it, it will be sound and will keep well.

if you wish to liquify horn in another way, take some and shave it up small and put it in the kind of lye used for soap making. Stir it into this until it dissolvesand then boil it up in the lye. Next pour (the horn) into any mould you wish and it will take the shape adn later will not warp. Then if you wish to tint it, add powdered pigment to it while it is stil soft inthe pan. The horn will take the colour of whatever pigment you put in. For colouring it is advisable to use white horn rather than black. You can mould coats of arms and fashion trumpets or whatever else you like (with horn treated this way).

If any of you horny chaps try these please let me knwo how they work out would really appreciate it.


middle english dictionary

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sally
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Postby sally » Wed Aug 24, 2005 4:02 pm

I can probably have a go at the second recipe without too much difficulty. Will add it to my list of experiments waiting to happen!



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Postby gregory23b » Wed Aug 24, 2005 4:10 pm

Some soap recipes from
Strasbourg manuscript

A medieval painter's handbook
translated from the old German

by Viola and Rosamund Borradaile

London Alec Tiranti 1966 - pre ISBN

Take one part of purified lime and two parts of sieved ashes and make a lye and strain it through a cloth. Take a raw egg and put it in the lye. if it floats on the surface it means the lye is strong enough. Pour this into a clean pan and put it on the fire, then put in the tallow and let it boil until you can draw up a therad when you test it. Next add more lye and hte longer you boil it the thicker it will be. After this take good white salt and throw it in gradually until you see that it is getting thin. Then take a stirring rod and plunge it in the pan anbd take it out again and if the solid part sticks to the wooden rod and wthe water has considerably reduced, the mixture has been sufficiently salted. After this the tallwo must go on boiling in the water until on taking it up on your finger you find that it is hard when you press it and also that not much water remains in the pan. This means ot has been cooked long enough. After this take a pan off the fire and let the mixture settle for a little while and when it has stood thus for a time take it up on the stirring rod and if it is as wghite as you wish it to be, run it off (into moulds). If however it is not white enough, let it stand overnight and when it is cool cut it out of the pan. This done pour off the water underneath. Afterwards clean out your pan with some unslaked lime and coarse ashesm even more lime than ashes, pouring on warm water and stirring this well round so that the water washes away any traces of lime. Afterwards let the liquid (which you set aside) become clear (by settling) and then strain it and pour it back into the cleaned pan and salt it. Next add the roughly cut up soap and cut it up small in the same water. Let it boil for as long as before, taking it up as previously on the finger and pressing it to test if it will stay. Then pour the soap out into a mould as before. In this way you will obtain perfectly white soap.

Another.

If you wish to make a good soap in another way take 2lbs quick lime 1 lb of willow wood ash and 1 lb of white (probably calcined) tartarum and 1/2 lb of alum and 8 oz verdigris (!) and pound all these together to powder and pour over tehm some lye made from wood ash. You should have 12 'mas' of lye and this should be poured over the powdr four times and when you have done this for the fourth time, it becomes clear and ready for use. Then take 6 - 8lbs of cakes of tallow or 'scheffins' or 'widrin' (lard?) and cut them up into small pieces putting htem into a large vat and pour over them the aforementioned lye. then cover the vat tightly with a lid and let is strand for a fortnight ot steep. In this way the tallow dissolves readily in the lye. Next pour off all that is in the vat into a large cauldron and hang it up over the fire and let it simmer slowly till teh mixture is reduced by morethan one half. Then take a 'fierling' of oil and stir it into the pot and let it boil up with the rest. then take the potoff the fire and let it stand overnight till it is quite cold and the next day the part which has risen to the top and is solid, must be taken off and pressed together wit a spoon to make it into a lump. This must be pressed into a rectangular glazed vessel. Then take a board and strew it with soeved lime and lay the tablets (of soap) on this board and let them dry there for a fortnight. They should be left in a draught in order to dry thoroughly. Prepared this way (the soap) will be ready for use and be pure white.

Another way of making a good soap is to take 2 lbs tallow 1/2 'mas' of washing lye, 1 gallon lime water and sieve this into this, white 'hundeskat' and 1/2 handful of salt petre and a little willow ash and let it all boil together till the mixture becomes as thick as pulp. When you wish to know whether it is sufficiently cooked, put a drop or two of it on a stone (rest is missing)

If you wish to make good soap, take 1lb quicklime 4lbs wood ashes 1lb brickdust and boil them in 100 qts water till this is reduced to 25 qts. Then put an egg in this lye. if it floats to the surface the lye is strong enough.

Take 10lbs lye, 10lbs soap tallow and boil this till it becomes thick. Then stir it round well and run off into moulds.

JK notes - in the book these last two are separate paras, which makes it seem the brick dust one is incomplete (but not noted as such as elsewhere) or more likely the rest is as previous recipes.
Last edited by gregory23b on Wed Aug 24, 2005 4:56 pm, edited 3 times in total.


middle english dictionary

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sally
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Postby sally » Wed Aug 24, 2005 4:15 pm

Just for the record, can we have the full bibliographic citation for the manuscript. The soap recipe looks perfectly do-able by the way, will be trying that one out in due course :D



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Postby Panzerman » Wed Aug 24, 2005 4:50 pm

I have several non food recipies - mainly for disaster - They involves substances that once mixed tend to go BANG fairly easily.....

Hence - I thought I'd share that with you whilst not being able (for obvious reasons) To share the actual recipies!!!!
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Panz - Forum sniper - infiltrate - one shot - exfiltrate....

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gregory23b
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Postby gregory23b » Wed Aug 24, 2005 5:07 pm

To whiten hands.

Now if had known ages and ages ago about Sally's book I might have dug this one up for her, as well as the blemish removal one.

Whoever wishes to whiten their hands, feet or skin should take lily bulbs and dry them well: then cruch them to a fine powder with bean flower and ground almonds. Then take soap and let this all soask in warm vinegar mixed with wine and take a whole egg and beat it all up together and anoint yourself with this for eight days running/ Whoever wishes to have lovely white hands that are admired by all should take 'wasser wurtsel' and cut them up small with great diligence and then must boil them in oil and bathe the face and hands with (the resulting ointment).

If you do not want to do this, anoint yourself with bracken manure or with donkey's milk and at every evening time with the roots of 'liebstöckel' (levisticum officianalis (lovage? jk)) soaked in water and in the morning wash your face with it, or in May drink the juice of 'taubenkropf (Fumaria Officinilas) boiled with honey, this gives you a marvellously beautiful skin.

Or take butter and lard and melt the two together and put the mixture into the cold lye and leave it for three days, then for 3 days in vinegar and then for three days in milk. Next put tragacanth and mastic in wine and let them steep overnight in a stone vessle and you must heat the mixture in an earthenware dish, and you must crush and grind "Geum urbanaum' and all these you must mix together. This is a most expensive ointment but if you anoint your face and hands with it they will be pink and white like milk and roses.

If you wish to make an ointment, which if you anoint a black mole (blemish or wart) with it the same turns white, take 'newerfender' taht can be caught in May and slice it into rainwater and boil it in the same pan and skim off the fat and take white incense and let it dissolve in to a pan and mix all together and then put it in a box and whatever black blemish you anoint with it will become white.

Enjoy Sally.


middle english dictionary

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sally
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Postby sally » Wed Aug 24, 2005 5:24 pm

Drat, I'm fresh out of newts...

Wonderful recipes though.



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Postby Thomas Hayman » Wed Aug 24, 2005 5:51 pm

A NEWT!!



well... i got better :lol: :lol: :lol: ROFLMAO




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