18thC activities

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William
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18thC activities

Postby William » Tue Mar 27, 2007 11:09 am

I am developing a series of 18thC museum events; mainly adult and family activities. I'm also trying to find National Curriculum links to add to our schools programme (probably science).

Most museums with an 18thC programme are (obviously) in the US with an American emphasis.

Can anyone suggest any good 'hands-on-activities' for kids, or craft activities for adults on 18thC topics?

I'm currently thinking along the lines of some sort of textile work for adults, and toys and games for children, but I am no 18thC expert and so any suggestions would be appreciated. What sort of living history activities do you do in camp?

Many thanks,
Will



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Wiblick
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Postby Wiblick » Tue Mar 27, 2007 11:24 am

Lucetting is the first thing that comes to mind.

http://www.woodedhamlet.com/howto_advic ... nstruc.htm

http://www.thelucet.co.uk/

although people say it was used in medieval and even viking times I reserve my use of it for 17th & 18th Century.



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Mark P.
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Postby Mark P. » Tue Mar 27, 2007 7:26 pm

Fan making or fan painting might be a sufficiently easy C18th trade to do as a childrens craft exercise. There's always the language of the fan to go with it as well (http://www.ideco.com/fans/language.htm) has some examples.

MP


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William
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Postby William » Tue Mar 27, 2007 10:46 pm

Thank you both so much. The fan idea is excellent, and not one I would have ever come up with alone. I'll work on both suggestions though.

Any more?

:wink:



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Neibelungen
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Postby Neibelungen » Tue Mar 27, 2007 11:08 pm

There were quite a few painted textile in the 18th C. Though not strictly the way they were done, you could batik designs with silk paints to copy them.

Tambur work was also very popular towards the end of the period and it's not that difficult to do.



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'Banastre'
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Postby 'Banastre' » Wed Mar 28, 2007 6:42 am

Perhaps just drawing?
Sketching with charcoal sounds.. accurate.


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Tamsin Lewis
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Postby Tamsin Lewis » Wed Mar 28, 2007 8:11 am

Music, song and dance always go down well



jfdiow
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Postby jfdiow » Wed Mar 28, 2007 10:06 am

Hi,

Writing with a quill pen (including preparing paper) always goes down well with children and adults. Preparing ink from scratch even involves some chemistry!
(not textiles I know!)

Irish stitch (flame stitch, Florentine Stitch, Bargello embroidery) was a very popular way of covering canvas- for chair seats, pocketbooks etc.
the basic stitch is very easy.

Medicine and science are developing a lot during the 18th century-a quick read through the first edition of Enc. Brit. (1774-, facsimile was printed in 1974) might give a few experiments to do with optics, longitude and latitude-use of a sextant etc., human and animal biology,
Genetics in the breeding of specialist farm animals was being developed during the 18th century- not an immediate activity but could be used as an introduction.
Technology was also being developed- steam power beginning, agriculture changing etc.

Dyes also offer an exciting activity- with some oportunity to think about science -chemistry-reactions-mordants, physics- colour and environment- using natural resources.

Hope that helps- and get in touch if you need to :-)

Best wishes,

Judith


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Mark P.
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Postby Mark P. » Wed Mar 28, 2007 7:47 pm

The reprinted 1st Ed Encyclopaedia Brittanica still seems to be available, if someone is interested in obtaining a set.

http://ukbookworld.com/cgi-bin/order_en ... RS%2378224
(http://ukbookworld.com/cgi-bin/order_en ... RS%2378224)

Very nice it is to. I keep mine on the shelf next to my Gibbon (insert your own joke here)

MP


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Lord Byron
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Postby Lord Byron » Wed Mar 28, 2007 10:16 pm

Mark P. wrote:
Very nice it is to. I keep mine on the shelf next to my Gibbon (insert your own joke here)

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Postby m300572 » Thu Mar 29, 2007 10:11 am

Mark P. wrote:


Very nice it is to. I keep mine on the shelf next to my Gibbon (insert your own joke here)

MP


Friend of WorkMonkeys is it?


OOOK!!


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William
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Postby William » Thu Mar 29, 2007 11:34 am

Many thanks again!
:D



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Peanutsmum
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Postby Peanutsmum » Tue Apr 10, 2007 1:32 pm

My son plays board games at events. He likes fox and geese and nine mens morris. Whether or not these were at their height of popularity in the 18th century is a matter for debate but they were in existence and are easy for children to learn. The sets are also easy enough to obtain or even make. We have ours embroidered on linen and then the board ties round the pieces (which are just pebbles) for transport.



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Tod
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Postby Tod » Wed Apr 11, 2007 11:14 am

Mark P. wrote:Fan making or fan painting might be a sufficiently easy C18th trade to do as a childrens craft exercise. There's always the language of the fan to go with it as well (http://www.ideco.com/fans/language.htm) has some examples.

MP


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