Light Infantry Company 1812 - distinguishing insignia

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RottenCad
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Light Infantry Company 1812 - distinguishing insignia

Postby RottenCad » Mon Jul 27, 2015 1:37 pm

Hello,

Just a quick question (I hope). How does one distinguish a redcoated Light Infantry Company from the regular companies? Other than a bugle hat-badge, is there anything else which would mark them out on the normal regimental facings?

Hoping for your collective wisdom,

Cad.


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Re: Light Infantry Company 1812 - distinguishing insignia

Postby John Waller » Mon Jul 27, 2015 3:24 pm

Rank and file would have shoulder wings, green worsted tuft in their regimental cap, green cap cords if wearing a 'belgic', different type of pockets in the coat (possibly). The coats would only have small regimental buttons.They would have the same lace as the other companies. Regimental variations no doubt existed.

Officers might have bugle badges on the coat turnbacks and carry curved swords (1803 pattern). Some adopted cavalry fashions - pelisses, hessians and other affectations such as green gloves.


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Re: Light Infantry Company 1812 - distinguishing insignia

Postby Neibelungen » Tue Jul 28, 2015 11:35 am

John pretty much covered the distinctions in full.

Pocket flaps tended to be vertical rather than horizontal, but not defined in regulations so seems to have been an acquired habit of distinction and wasn't universal.
They seem to have followed the light infantry regiments (43rd 52nd etc) in style

In 1813 or 14 they introduced a GO for numerals for the bugle badge, but not always applied depending on the delivery of the years clothing issue (2 years for hats and metalwork), so appears at different dates.


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Re: Light Infantry Company 1812 - distinguishing insignia

Postby John Waller » Tue Jul 28, 2015 1:51 pm

As Andrew says - regimental number below the bugle horn badge on belgic caps. There is a good surviving example from an officer of the 33rd regt. There is however the front of a guards light coy belgic cap in Brussels, supposedly from the field of Waterloo, that has a normal regimental plate surmounted by a small bugle horn badge - so again regimental variations. The cockade may also have a small bugle badge instead of a regimental button in the centre.


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