A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

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A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Saint Egregious » Sun Sep 11, 2011 5:59 pm

Found this whilst nosing about for something completely different. Thought the porridge set might find this linx (PDF) to be of interest. Is there a porridge sett? If there isn't there should be. Oatmeal Tartan! That would make spilling ones porridge down ones front less of a faux pas. No one would even notice! Save on cleaning costs as well, how frugal. Why, just let it set up into a crust, peel it off and have it for break time! There it is, I'm off to the weavers. I can see massive profits are looming on the horizon, hurry to get yours before there is none weft on the shelves! I'm leasing out 'warped'. It will cost you twenty quid to use it. Beam back if you want to lease the rights. We will send it out on the first fly shuttle. Send your money orders to: Bobbin Winder, 62 Rising Shed, On the Lamms, Sussex.

It's all about a drawstring kilt circa 1822.

Although now called simply MacGregor, Wilsons called it MacGregor-Murray in their 1819 Key Pattern Book which was how the chief’s family was styled at the time.


The late 18th and early 19th centuries were a period of great variation and change in the development of Highland Dress. Covering much of the reign of Geo III (1760-1820) and the Regency (1811-1820). Both these periods, and the later reigns of Geo IV (1820-30) and William IV (1830-37) encompass what is termed the Highland Revival era.


Have a peruse, it's a very interesting read. It was researched and written by Peter Eslea MacDonald.

http://www.scottishtartans.co.uk/A_High ... Gregor.pdf


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Grymm » Mon Sep 12, 2011 11:22 am

Porridge sett? Wouldn't that look like a greyish beige tweed?


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Tod » Mon Sep 12, 2011 1:56 pm

A few of us Porridge Set has been researching/experimenting with this for a while. Almost every book and web site says that you lay your plaid down, pleat it, put the belt under it then lie on it and do it up etc. Whilst this is true of re-enactors 9 years of working up at the Highfolk Museum has lead me to conclude that this method is total rubbish.
Why. In winter it gets to 30 below with the wind chill factor, is a bit windy and the ground is covered in snow or ice. So would you leave your (almost) warm house and go outside with your blanket and try and put it on in that way? The houses are way too small to lay a plaid out, a fire in the middle doesn't help. This means that either they had another way or they had drawstrings. The latter is logical and we have this (later) example, plus one picture (C17) which shows the draw string ends.
Mike Netten and I tried the drawstring method a few weeks ago, it was outside and very windy. What we found was that although it wasn't easy (maybe due to lack of experience) it was possible to put a full plaid on standing up. Our only error was the belt (draw string) loops were too far apart, they need to be around 6" maximum to be effective.



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Andy R » Mon Sep 12, 2011 3:16 pm

Tod wrote:Why. In winter it gets to 30 below with the wind chill factor, is a bit windy and the ground is covered in snow or ice. So would you leave your (almost) warm house and go outside with your blanket and try and put it on in that way? The houses are way too small to lay a plaid out, a fire in the middle doesn't help. This means that either they had another way or they had drawstrings.


Or they wore something else....

To quotes from the 16th and 17th centuries
they call us Reddshankes..for boithe Somer and Wyntir (except when the frost is most vehement) goyinge alwaise bair leggid


In the sharp Winter weather the Highland Men wear close Trowzers which cover there thighs, legs and feet...at other times they content themselves with short hose, which scarce reach the knees


Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Tod » Mon Sep 12, 2011 7:25 pm

:roll:
With that logic it means every time it was breezy they'd put some trousers on (trews) or go about just in a shirt. I think the bare legged is with a plaid. The problem with trews is the cost and the waste of cloth. Plus a plaid does every thing trews don't (other than be snug :lol: )



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Wim-Jaap » Tue Sep 13, 2011 6:09 am

Tod wrote:Whilst this is true of re-enactors 9 years of working up at the Highfolk Museum has lead me to conclude that this method is total rubbish.
Why. In winter it gets to 30 below with the wind chill factor, is a bit windy and the ground is covered in snow or ice. So would you leave your (almost) warm house and go outside with your blanket and try and put it on in that way? The houses are way too small to lay a plaid out, a fire in the middle doesn't help.


I can plead my plaid inside of my a-frame tent, I use less then half the space... the houses in newtonmore have bigger floorspaces then that.

So Why go outside to do your plaid origami if you can do it inside?

I don't know if there were any drawstrings, I know there was a discusion about them.

It might be easier to put on yer plaid.

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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Tod » Tue Sep 13, 2011 11:43 am

I tried pleating a plaid in the houses. You have to move every thing out of the way, and remember those houses have little or no furniture. The house would also be full of people, we estimate at least 15 in some houses. I can do mine in a tent, but my tent is well lit and clean.



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Andy R » Tue Sep 13, 2011 11:48 am

Tod wrote::roll:
With that logic it means every time it was breezy they'd put some trousers on (trews) or go about just in a shirt. I think the bare legged is with a plaid. The problem with trews is the cost and the waste of cloth. Plus a plaid does every thing trews don't (other than be snug :lol: )


No Tod, it's not logic, it is first hand primary documentation from people who lived there at that time giving first hand accounts based on what they were actually doing. :devil:

Also, like Wim, I can get a plaid on in a three foot width with less length than I can lie down in, in most environments (because God knows I have had to in the past)

The trickiest one was in a hotel corridor in the states where the nylon carpet made so much static that I couldn't pull the plaid across it....


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Tod » Tue Sep 13, 2011 12:28 pm

I tried it and it comes out a mess. Every bit of muck sticks to it (and don't talk about compacted earth floors) and where ever I did it there was some thing in the way. The only house that had enough room was the Tacksmans and that was only when no one else was in there.
Your quote says they were bare legged and the other says trews, I'd say both are right, but the latter not for the less well off, who also didn't write any thing down.
I still think they either had draw strings or some thing else. As I said that is based on trying to do it in the houses and considering who and what was in there as well at the time. Another thought I had was to pleat it stading up by waving it back and forth in front of you, this would help to get the muck out it as well (from around the fire where they slept). Then pick it up in the middle and belt it on and pull the width around your body. I tried it and it wasn't easy, but it was possible and may be due to my lack of practice of that method.
What ever way you think about it, the lay out the full length and then pleat it method is wrong.



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Andy R » Tue Sep 13, 2011 12:57 pm

The quote says bare legged except "when the frost is most vehement".

In the Q culture highlands trews are very common - they predate the wearing of the plaid. Certainly in the 17th and 18th centuries there are plenty of refferneces to the plaid being worn with trews (NOT as a feileadh mor), and more importantly it is worth remembering that highland culture put clothes and appearences before most things

And although a great sorte of us Reddshankes go after this maner in our countrethe, yeit never the les, whene we come to the courte...waitinge on our Lordes and Maisters...we have as good garmentis as some of the fellowis whiche gyve attendaunce in the courte every daye.


One of the re-enactorisms is that of the pleating of the plaid - that it has to be done "just so" and hang "like this". There are some fantastic contemporary drawings which show the plaid being worn in many divers ways. The same way that hose were worn short to show the shape of the calf (hose coming to the widest part of the calf rather than to below the knee) the plaid was also worn short to show of the shapely leg and one drawing has the elements on the front outer of the thigh drawn right up.

But period pladi also seems to have been a lot finer than re-enacters warrent.

Another two 17th century quotes from either end of the century

the plad is made of fine wool, the thread as fine as can be made of that kind...The length of it is commonly seven double ells;

a plead about their shoulders, which is a mantle of divers colours, much finer and lighter stuff than their hose


Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Hraefn » Tue Sep 13, 2011 1:31 pm

Andy R wrote:
One of the re-enactorisms is that of the pleating of the plaid - that it has to be done "just so" and hang "like this". There are some fantastic contemporary drawings which show the plaid being worn in many divers ways.



On that very point I've noticed in numerous paintings, etchings and literary quotes about the plaid being worn drawn up between the legs like this fella

Image

But I've never seen it portrayed by 'Highlanders' in a modern re-enactment of any period, why I wondered?
My first (cynical) thoughts as to why it doesn't get worn like this today are;
It looks like a bloody huge tartan nappy
Makes the wearer look like a dick
Both essentially applying modern esthetics to period dress, wearing my plaid like this and I won't look cool or get any interest from the girlies.
I maybe being on the harsh side though, any thoughts?

I do like his sporran/purse looks very like my 15thC one =o)


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Tod » Tue Sep 13, 2011 1:51 pm

I think that is the way its hanging, the plaid that is. Its pushed back by the sporran and dirk. I met a textile expert when I was at the Museum this year, he is involved in the restoration of Knockando Mill. I could have listened to him for hours (I'm going to invite him and his partner for dinner next time I'm there he knows loads of things). He thought the samples I showed him of what we wear are too light in weight.

I couldn't agree more about the fine pleats and just so look, there was no room for an iron and board in those houses either. As for the mix of trews and plaid, I'd say yes, a lot say no.



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby John Waller » Tue Sep 13, 2011 3:31 pm

Stuart Reid wrote once that the average kilted redshanks probably resembled a bundle of dirty washing with legs. I know I did the last time I wore my plaid (in the comfort of my living room).


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Saint Egregious » Wed Sep 14, 2011 9:24 pm

Can we see some photos of your experiments with the drawstring plaid?

Promise we won't laugh, honest. But tell me it doesn't look like the one pictured in the previous post. If it does I can't promise that I won't snicker, just a little bit, no I lie, if it does I'll probably blow tea out my nose.

I swear that fellow has horribly enlarged testicles.


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby John Waller » Thu Sep 15, 2011 9:31 am

Saint Egregious wrote:I swear that fellow has horribly enlarged testicles.


That would be Buster McGonad of Clan McViz in the portrait?


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Saint Egregious » Thu Sep 15, 2011 12:14 pm

That would be Buster McGonad of Clan McViz in the portrait?


Now that makes sense, the young fellow in the foreground has been rendered speechless by the sight of those enormous family jewels. I'll bet he prays hard every day that he takes after his mothers side of the family.


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Andy R » Thu Sep 15, 2011 12:57 pm

A nice picture of Alexander McCracken who has the nicest Jacobite officer kit I know of

Image


Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Tod » Thu Sep 15, 2011 1:39 pm

Very god clothing, IMO one of the best turned out Highlanders is Henrik, he puts in huge amounts of effort and detail, and travels all the way from Norway.



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Andy R » Thu Sep 15, 2011 2:04 pm

He's good, but I prefer this

Image

Facial hair aside, it is the complete set of French arms (period fusil, gargousier and epee de soldat in a pucker French carriage) and the lack of the re-enacterism basket hilt and targe which makes this an incredibly fine specimen.

And you know that when I say incredibly fine specimen, I am holding back..!!!


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby steve stanley » Thu Sep 15, 2011 4:57 pm

Avoncroft?


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby cannontickler » Thu Sep 15, 2011 7:28 pm

Andy R wrote:He's good, but I prefer this

Image

Facial hair aside, it is the complete set of French arms (period fusil, gargousier and epee de soldat in a pucker French carriage) and the lack of the re-enacterism basket hilt and targe which makes this an incredibly fine specimen.

And you know that when I say incredibly fine specimen, I am holding back..!!!



look, i've told you weirdo's about the wearing of those girlie mini skirts before,
now i've got the horn again.......and can we have stockings and suspenders next time please...?


it was a quick process until they made it efficient .

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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby cannontickler » Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:26 pm

DEAR GOD.....look what happens when you put ' Jacobite Army ' into a google word search....


Image

its like a giant Jacobite hampster.......!!!!


it was a quick process until they made it efficient .

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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Tod » Thu Sep 15, 2011 9:03 pm

That is a bad picture :lol: I heard he shaves these days and found another chin and bought an 18th century shaving kit which rips more than it cuts.
I even bought a new hat.
I'm still trying to work out why that picture was chosen for the front of an advert for an event.........................oh yes now I remember. 8-) 8-)



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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Saint Egregious » Thu Sep 15, 2011 10:58 pm

Well and good, but is the giant Jacobite hamster wearing a drawstring plaid? The pictures of the other porridge munchers are spiff, thanks for posting them, but what about some photos of the drawstring plaid experiments? After all this thread is about A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

look, i've told you weirdo's about the wearing of those girlie mini skirts before,
now i've got the horn again.......and can we have stockings and suspenders next time please...?


What???? Pictures of them dressed in only stockings and suspenders? Now that's weird!!!! No.....don't ever want to see that. Not never ever.


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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Saint Egregious » Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:55 pm

An article by Matthew Newsome of the Scottish Tartans Authority and Scottish Tartans Museum in Franklin, NC, USA. Remember it's an american firm in america, and so don't mistake it for a museum actually situated in Scotland. Can't figure out how they can call themselves THE Scottish Tartans Authority, very misleading. http://www.scottishtartans.org/


So here it is, coming at you, LoTek style. ...


Did the Early Belted Plaid Have A Drawstring?

by Matthew Newsome.

The belted plaid (feilidh-mór or breacan-feile in Gaelic) can be described as the "grandfather" of our modern tailored kilt. It is the earliest form of kilted garment worn in the Highlands of Scotland that we are aware of, and its use can be documented back to 1594.

The modern kilt is a tailored, skirt-like garment that reaches from the waist to the knee, with pleats sewn into the back. The "father" of this tailored kilt is the philabeg (feilidh-beag, or "small wrap") which was a length of cloth some 25" to 30" wide and four yards long, gathered into pleats or folds, and belted securely around the waist.
The father of the philabeg, and so the grandfather of the modern kilt, would then be the feilidh ("wrap") or, as it later came to be known, the feilidh-mór ("large wrap"). Like the philabeg, this garment was also untailored. It consisted of basically two lengths of cloth, each 25" to 30" wide and about four yards long, stitched to each other along one of the long ends, to create a plaid (blanket) that was 50" to 60" wide and about four yards in length (this seems to be the average, though exact lengths doubtlessly varied somewhat). It, too, was gathered into pleats or folds and belted securely at the waist. The upper part was then draped and arranged around the shoulders and upper body to suit the wearer.

To don the belted plaid, the wearer must somehow get this some 12 feet of cloth reduced down to something about 1.5 times his waist size. Typically, re-enactors today do this by lying the tartan on the ground and manually arranging the pleats, then lying down upon it, wrapping it around themselves, and belting it on. For a more detailed description of how this is done, see my book, Early Highland Dress.
People have long objected that this is too cumbersome a process for a simple shepherd, or a soldier, to get dressed. They especially object to the idea of laying down upon the often wet and muddy ground to get dressed. Of course, it is possible to don the plaid while standing. But the gathering must be done in the hand, and the upper part of the plaid must then be held in place at the shoulder (by other people, or if alone, by holding it between under your chin), the belt fastened, and then the lower part tugged around front until the desired look is achieved. While this avoids the problem of lying on the ground, it certainly is no less cumbersome a process!

Part of the problem is that no one ever wrote down exactly how they donned their plaids. All we have surviving for us are portraits depicting the Highlanders in their garb, showing what the end result looks like. We can think of different ways the plaid may have been put on that would achieve the desired results, and judge the methods according to that criteria, but it is impossible to say, with any accuracy, which method may or may not have been historically correct.

Different people have offered different solutions to this problem. Some say that the Highlanders simply didn't take their plaids off that often. Since they were wearing them days at a time, it didn't matter as much that they were cumbersome to put on. Not everyone agrees this was true, however. I have always been of the opinion that it only seems cumbersome to us because we don't have anything remotely similar in our modern western dress to compare it to. Some people have gone so far as to say that the pleats were sewn into the belted plaid, like they are in the modern kilt, but this does not hold up to historical scrutiny. For one, part of the purpose of the belted plaid was that it could be used unbelted, as well, as a plaid (Gaelic for "blanket") for sleeping in and other uses. Stitching in the pleats would remove this functionality. Secondly, no surviving examples of such a tailored plaid survive for us.

We know that the pleats were not stitched into the feilidh-beag until the 1790s. And it is no surprise that the earliest surviving tailored kilts we have are from the 1790s and early 1800s. Why don't we have any surviving examples of untailored philabegs or belted plaids? The answer is because they were untailored. What do you do with an old length of cloth once it has become threadbare and no longer suitable for clothing? You cut it up and use it for scraps or rags. Or if parts of it are still useable, you make it into something else. If the pleats were indeed ever sewn into the belted plaid, you would no longer have a multi-functional length of cloth, but rather a tailored garment, and if this practice were widespread we would expect that at least some of these tailored garments would have survived for us.

One very practical solution to donning the belted plaid has recently come to the attention of Highland dress historians. In the collection of the Scottish Tartans Society is a belted plaid that was worn by Sir John Murray MacGregor of MacGregor on the occasion of King George IV's visit to Edinburgh in 1822. This plaid has small loops sewn into the inside waistline, at the rate of one loop for every repeat of the tartan pattern. (Note: According to an article written by Jamie Scarlett, the loops were sewn to the inside. According to conversation with Bob Martin, the loops are on the outside.) A cord was threaded through these loops, like a drawstring. The loops are then slid together along the cord, the cord is tied at the waist, the front aprons of the plaid are arranged, and an outer belt is put on the secure the whole thing. Viola! An easy and simple way to don the belted plaid.

But this garment was worn in 1822 -- well after the belted plaid ceased to be worn as anything more than a ceremonial garment by certain traditionally minded individuals. Were the drawstring loops a recent innovation, or was there any basis for this in antiquity? The answer to this question was first suggested to me by kilt maker and kilt historian Bob Martin, who has the advantage of not only being a student of Highland dress, but an expert artist and painter as well. Combining both skills, he has a knack for seeing small, but important details in old portraits of people wearing Highland dress that others are likely to miss.

Such an important detail was found in a portrait of Lord Mungo Murray (often called simply, "Highland Chieftain") by John Michael Wright. Wright lived from 1617-1694, and different resources give the date of this particular painting as anywhere from 1660-1680. Pictured at the top of this article, it is the earliest depiction of tartan in a major portrait. It now hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh. But one thing about it that has always struck Bob Martin as odd was what appeared to be a twisted cord of some type tied around the figure's waist, seemingly with no purpose (see the detail at right). What was this cord tied to? What was it used for?

When Bob had the opportunity to examine the MacGregor belted plaid from 1822, however, he had his answer. This cord could be nothing other than a drawstring in the belted plaid. It fit the bill perfectly! Here we have pictured, in the seventeenth century, a plaid worn secured by a drawstring on the inside, and a belt on the outside. This is certainly evidence suggesting the early usage of such an aid in donning the belted plaid.
Keep in mind that the earliest documented instance we have of the belted plaid being worn is from 1594. This portrait was painted between 1660-1680. Mungo Murray was the fifth son of the second Earl of Atholl. It is uncertain how old he is in this picture, but it is said that he "died young" around the year 1700, which certainly speaks to his being a young man when this portrait was commissioned. So we can assume that he belonged to about the third generation of Highlanders wearing the belted plaid.

It is unlikely that Mungo Murray in the seventeenth century, and John Murray MacGregor, in the nineteenth century, each independently had the same novel idea about adding a drawstring to their plaids. More likely this is a tradition that had been around since at least the seventeenth century, and though it may not have ever been in universal use, it was common enough to continue right on into the nineteenth century and the end of the "belted plaid era." The reason it has been a "secret" in more modern times is most likely due to the fact that it is invisible when worn, and so not likely to show up in most portraits, and easily removed when the plaid's function has been outlived, and so no physical record would remain.
For those seeking a more convenient and plausible method of donning the belted plaid, the drawstring is one choice that is grounded in historic tradition. (Bob Martin now offers as part of his kilt making service the sewing of small loops into the inside waist of the plaid, at the interval of one per repeat of the sett, as in the case with the MacGregor plaid, and uses parachute cord as a drawstring).


As an interesting side note on the Mungo Murray portrait, as I stated above, it is considered the earliest depiction of tartan Highland dress in a major portrait. In 1994, Alasdair MacLeod, of Edinburgh, did a study of the painting, in which he extrapolated a thread count for the tartan being worn. That thread count is given below. To reproduce the cloth as shown in the painting, it should be woven with a broad black selvage of about 100 threads.

T20, Y8, K4, Y4, K4, Y4, K4, Y8, S2, Y4, S2, Y8, K8, Y6, S14, Y6, S14, Y2, K2, Y2, SR14, Y2, K2, Y2, S14, Y2, K2, Y2, S14, Y6, S14, Y6, K8, Y8, K4, Y4, K4, Y8, K8, Y12, K4, Y12, K4, Y12, K4, Y12, K4, Y12, K4, Y12, K20, Y8, T2, W4, T2, Y4, T2, W4, T2, Y8, K12, Y2, W4




I've had it with ALL THIS - *I want ROOM SERVICE*! I want the club sandwich, I want the cold Mexican beer, I want a $10,000-a-night hooker! I want my shirts laundered... like they do... at the Imperial Hotel... in Tokyo.


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Wim-Jaap
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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Wim-Jaap » Sat Sep 17, 2011 8:38 am

maybe a strange question, but always when we are talking about a drawstring, only this one painting is used as reference, why is it that only this painting shows the drawstring, as it was so widely used so it survived into the 19th century?

just curious.

greenthings,

Wim-Jaap


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cannontickler
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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby cannontickler » Sat Sep 17, 2011 9:26 am

pics of some of my gang for you to peruse ................

Image

John Campbell, Lord Glenorchy, later 3rd Earl of Breadalbane and Holland, 1708

Image

John Campbell, Lord Glenorchy, ca. 1735 or, more probably, the 1720s

Image

Sheriff Charles Campbell of Lochlane, ca. 1730

Image

John "of the Bank" Campbell of Ardmaddie, 1749

Image

Pryse (or Pryce) Campbell, 18th Thane of Cawdor, 1762

Also................

Image


Sir Robert Dalrymple of Castleton,
one of the earliest pictures of a Lowland laird wearing tartan. Anon. c.1720

Image

Alastair Grant Mohr, honorary Champion to the Laird of Grant,
Painted by Richard Waitt

Image

The Pinch of Snuff, painted by William Delacour in 1750.

Image

Corporal Malcolm McPherson of the Black Watch, who was shot in the Tower of London for mutiny in 1743.


it was a quick process until they made it efficient .

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Henrik Bjoern Boegh
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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Henrik Bjoern Boegh » Sat Sep 17, 2011 2:04 pm

Thanks Tod. :) It means a lot to hear :)

I've made two drawstring'ed plaids. I did mine based on pictures I got from a guy who had his made by the Tartan Museum in the US, and the only difference is that instead of using tartan for the loops, it had leather. So that's what I did. I added two drawstrings instead of one, because I liked to be able to wear the plaid without a belt if I wanted to. The one worn by Mungo Murray is worn with the drawstring on the inside, as that's the only possible way for the drawstring to be visible around outside the shirt, like in the painting.

So far I've not found an easy way to get the plaid on with pleats all the way round your waist without the drawstring.

I'm with Tod in the whole discussion. It just isn't a practical garment to wear indoors in crowded space, and it's a very bad idea to try and arrange it on the floor of a Highland house.

Cheers,
Henrik


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Saint Egregious
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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Saint Egregious » Sat Sep 17, 2011 3:33 pm

pics of some of my gang for you to peruse ................


And not one picture of them dressed in only stockings and suspenders?????

I've made two drawstring'ed plaids. I did mine based on pictures I got from a guy who had his made by the Tartan Museum in the US, and the only difference is that instead of using tartan for the loops, it had leather. So that's what I did. I added two drawstrings instead of one, because I liked to be able to wear the plaid without a belt if I wanted to. The one worn by Mungo Murray is worn with the drawstring on the inside, as that's the only possible way for the drawstring to be visible around outside the shirt, like in the painting.


Any possibility of posting pictures showing the contruction/layout that you used?


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Saint Egregious
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Re: A Highland Revival Drawstring Plaid.

Postby Saint Egregious » Sat Sep 17, 2011 3:48 pm

Have a look at the painting six down from the top: Sir Robert Dalrymple of Castleton,one of the earliest pictures of a Lowland laird wearing tartan. Anon. c.1720

You can see that Sir Robert Dalrymple is tactfully replying to the age old question, "What is worn under the tartan, Sir Robert?"

Ach, are yae sure that's nae a drawstrrring Sir Robert?


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