St Andrews Day in the British Army 1742

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Mark P.
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St Andrews Day in the British Army 1742

Postby Mark P. » Wed Nov 28, 2007 9:22 am

An extract from the diary of an Officer of the 13th Foot in Garison at Brugge in 1742.

An interesting example of the way national groups within the British Army maintained their own celebtrations and traditions.

Today being St Andrews all the Scotch Officers had crosses upon the right Sides of their hats and meeting at the Grand Coffee House about seven in the Evening they marched in a body from thence, with a Bagpiper playing before them, to Seargeant WIlsons where Sr Lind’n Ag’n gave an entertainment.


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Postby m300572 » Wed Nov 28, 2007 11:27 am

Did the 13th have a territorial recruiting area at the time - I know they eventually turned in to the Somerset Light Infantry but I have no idea where they were originally recruited from.


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Postby Matt_D » Wed Nov 28, 2007 1:08 pm

I know I read somewhere that the 13th recruited a lot of yorkshiremen at one point in the 1740's although I expect that like most regiments they recruited extensively in Ireland.

Mark or Gerry might be able to confirm this but I also read that when the 13th landed for the '45 they were bolstered by the addition of a cavalry yeomanry (Yorkshire Blues) because they were so depleted from Flanders.



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Postby Matt_D » Wed Nov 28, 2007 1:08 pm

I know I read somewhere that the 13th recruited a lot of yorkshiremen at one point in the 1740's although I expect that like most regiments they recruited extensively in Ireland.

Mark or Gerry might be able to confirm this but I also read that when the 13th landed for the '45 they were bolstered by the addition of a cavalry yeomanry (Yorkshire Blues) because they were so depleted from Flanders.



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Postby Mark P. » Wed Nov 28, 2007 1:13 pm

I assumed recruiting would tend to be done locally rather than by allocated region. The 13th Foot were based in Scotland 1735 to 1739 (including Edinburgh Castle 1738/39) so I would expect some Scottish recruits in the rank and file as well as the Officers.

I can't imagine them sending recruiting parties all the way back to Somerset. The Regimental affiliation with Somerset came in in 1781 or 82 I think.


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Postby Mark P. » Wed Nov 28, 2007 2:00 pm

Mark or Gerry might be able to confirm this but I also read that when the 13th landed for the '45 they were bolstered by the addition of a cavalry yeomanry (Yorkshire Blues)


That would be Captain William Thornton's Company but I'm pretty sure they were infantry.
More here.

http://livinghistory.co.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3847
(http://livinghistory.co.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?t=3847)


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Postby Tod » Wed Nov 28, 2007 2:19 pm

Yes they were I did some digging about them, and even bought the cloth for the uniform.



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Postby Alan_F » Wed Nov 28, 2007 7:41 pm

This begs the question, would a lowlander be quite a common site in a regiment raised in England?


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Postby Mark P. » Thu Nov 29, 2007 9:21 am

In a Regiment newly raised in England probably not.
In an established 'English' regiment based in Scotland I would think it would not be uncommon to find Scots rank and file.


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Postby Mark P. » Fri Nov 30, 2007 9:22 am

This begs the question, would a lowlander be quite a common site in a regiment raised in England?


From the same source, perhaps this guy was recruited in Scotland?


At 11 went to a Court Martial to try a Prisoner of (Lt) Colonel Moreau's (company) for drinkng the Pretenders health, gave him 1000 lashes, at 4 different times.


(Moses Moreau was Lt Col of the 13th Foot at this time.)


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Postby m300572 » Sat Dec 01, 2007 10:31 am

Not necessarily a Scots recruit Mark - there were a lot of High Church Tories who had Jacobite sympathies (and a large number of Jacobite 'secret' societies in England) - one of the great disappointments of both the 1715 and 1745 Jacobite Risings was the lack of real support from most of these 'tavern tories' when the Jacobite armies actually marched through England, although Duffy's book gives a list of English unrest in support of the Jacobites in the 45.


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