somme 2006

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4812trenchy
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somme 2006

Postby 4812trenchy » Fri Sep 09, 2005 10:20 am

The Great War Society

Battle of the Somme 90th Anniversary

Saturday 1st July 2006

‘Last Post for the Pals’


Saturday 1st July 2006 marks the 90th anniversary of the start of the Battle of the Somme in 1916. This date is synonymous, in public memory, with the loss of 60,000 British soldiers who fell on that day. People had been told this was the start of the ‘Big Push’, the battle that would bring victory and end the Great War. Moreover, the eager volunteers who had joined up in an ecstasy of patriotism in August 1914 were fighting in this, their first major battle. Many towns and cities had raised their own battalions with their unique camaraderie; these were the famous ‘Pals’ battalions. These soldiers had grown up together, worked together and joined up together. Their comradeship had seen them through the rigours of army life and now they were keen to show what they could do. No one had quite conceived the consequences for a locality, if things were to go seriously wrong….

The 31st Division comprised 12 such Pals battalions from Bradford, Leeds, Sheffield, Barnsley, Hull, Durham and Accrington. Their attack that day would centre on the little known village of Serre. Following a long bombardment, they went ‘over the top’ at 7.30am in waves, at the start of a lovely summer’s day. Despite being told they would meet no resistance, they were mown down by shellfire and machine-guns. By 9.30am, after many costly attempts, it was all over; No-man’s Land was carpeted with dead and dying. At a roll-call, only 50 of the 600 1st Bradford Pals, who had attacked that morning, would answer, all officers were lost. All attacking battalions had been practically wiped out for little or no gain. Serre had not fallen. The Pals had been indeed, ‘Two years in the making, Ten minutes in the destroying’.

As the news filtered back to these towns, it became clear a disaster had occurred. The local newspapers contained page after page of photographs of the fallen that ran well into August. The spirit of the Pals battalions, and indeed that of their hometowns had died too.

To commemorate the actions of these Pals battalions that day, a special event is being planned for the evening of 1st July 2006.


The Great War Society (the foremost UK ‘living history’ group for the 1914-18 period) will be forming up at Serre Road No.1 Military Cemetery to sound the ‘Last Post’ for all the Pals who fell. With due reverence to the occasion and strict attention to historical accuracy, it is expected over 20 ‘Tommies’, wearing the full British uniform of the 1916 period will parade wearing the insignia and badges of the 16th West Yorkshire Regiment (1st Bradford Pals), and others from the 31st Division.

At the centre, will be a bugler dressed as 15th West Yorkshire Regiment (Leeds Pals). The instrument he will be using will be one of the original Leeds Pals bugles, presented to them in 1914 – it is believed, this bugle has not been sounded in France since the Great War.






For those who attend, it will be an event that none there will forget….and for those members of the Pals battalions who will always remain here…our finest tribute.

The Great War Society
www.thegreatwarsociety.com
Contact:
David P. Whithorn
(david.whithorn@tiscali.co.uk)
Attachments
mmm.JPG
the bradford pals


this is a webely 445. ..............

4812trenchy
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photo

Postby 4812trenchy » Fri Sep 09, 2005 10:23 am

photo
Attachments
mmmmmm.JPG


this is a webely 445. ..............

4812trenchy
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Postby 4812trenchy » Fri Sep 30, 2005 2:50 pm

just came back from a cracking event in champange and all does look well for next year. hooraha. :P :lol:


this is a webely 445. ..............

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Sani
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Postby Sani » Mon Nov 21, 2005 4:12 pm

Just a question, but how much would you say a basic WWI Tommy impression costs? Its something thats interested for me abit, and would just like to compare it to the costs of Wehrmacht re-enactment.



private Shorthouse
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Postby private Shorthouse » Mon Nov 21, 2005 9:01 pm

Hi Sani,
Trenchy and I are members of The Great War Society. I would say that my kit, which allows me to cover 1914 to 1917 (no SBR). Has cost around £1200 to £1400.
It always depends on how far you want to go and how high your standards are.
Regards Ian.



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Sani
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Postby Sani » Mon Nov 21, 2005 10:17 pm

Hi Ian

Thanks for the fast reply. So its not too dis-similar to a basic jerry 1940's kit-out.

O'what a lovely war.
Tom.


Private Dietz sir!

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Jon Das Reich
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Postby Jon Das Reich » Wed Nov 23, 2005 12:56 pm

I must admit i find WW1 a sad war and was lucky not to have any relations killed in WW1 all survived but my wifes great uncle got killed on the somme on the 13th November 1916

http://www.cwgc.org/cwgcinternet/casual ... ty=2854047

I too would of been interested on reenacting WW1 Tommy if i didnt do WW2 German.

Where do you guys get your kit from?

Cheers
Jon


Our Flag Is Going forward Too

private Shorthouse
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Joined: Wed Aug 10, 2005 6:39 pm

Postby private Shorthouse » Mon Nov 28, 2005 3:36 pm

Hi Jon,
Sorry for the delay in replying.
Most of my kit comes from Pegasus Militaria and is an exact copy of an original item. The no1 pattern army boots most of us wear are made by Ross Boots. I have 2 stiff caps one made by a military milliner the other by Dickie Knight both very good.
Other odds and sods come from members of the society or are made for the society.
Regards Ian.



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Jon Das Reich
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Postby Jon Das Reich » Tue Nov 29, 2005 12:55 am

Hi P.S
Thanks for the reply, my greatgrandad was a canadian in WW1 only found that out about 12 months ago.
Another great uncle served in the south staffs and the Royal engineers had something to do with the railways behind the lines i have his medals framed which came on a large sheet with his name number and saying he was honabley discharged due to being disabled ( lost aleg as we knew) and theres a picture or ink drawing of britannia sitting on a throne and facing her a couple of soliders. I hope that makes sence to you lol

Another great grandad was in the service corps in WW1as he was getting on abit having srved in the boar war.


Our Flag Is Going forward Too

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Warden_D
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Postby Warden_D » Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:39 pm

Hello everyone,

About 2 months ago I and about 30 other 'extras' helped the BBC make a new programme about the Somme. I think it is planned to be shown in July for the 90th.

Long day filming but how often do you get to play with a tank? (often if your lucky like panzerman).


I am slowly working on a WW1 impression which I hope to have ready for 2007. I think you chaps are planning a wonderful and worthwhile trip

Good luck

Warden D

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