Le Boissier-Ecole - best event ever

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Andy R
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Le Boissier-Ecole - best event ever

Postby Andy R » Thu Sep 25, 2008 1:07 pm

I put this is the F&G section as well, as the event was so good it deserved a more general audience, but to keep it in it's historical place as well.....

On the 13th and 14th of September we took part in the campaign of La Boissier-Ecole. Just to the south west of Paris.

Despite the low numbers compared to other events (7 allied cavalry, and 20 something allied infantry Vs 33 Imperial cavalry (lights and heavies) and 60 something foot with cannon in support) this was by far and away one of the best events I have ever had the privilege in attending.

As a campaign event it started at 7am Saturday morning and ran through to 3pm on Sunday with the participants living off what they could carry.

The event was objective driven, so for example we would have to advance upon a crossroad and hold it until the allied column arrived (resplendent with a baggage cart pulled by a very handsome Percheron)

The light horse and light infantry had to scout ahead, cover the rear, look for the enemy and make sure that there was a way of feeding back anything that was discovered.
The light troops had to work independently and co dependently and it has to be said it was a real joy working with the 95th.
As the playing area covered many square kilometres (25 I think?) we were in the unusual state of actually having to find the opposition, and not actually knowing where they were.

Highlights include…

Vedette work when you really don’t know who's out there.
Surprising a vedette of Chasseurs au Cheval of the guard and charging in to them when they didn’t even have their sabres drawn
Charging the French cavalry force before they could deploy from a woodland path in to a field and deploy in line
Working with the baggage and sappers when they had to make a road through the trees as the deeply rutted path that we had taken was un-suitable for the cart
Charging the entire French cavalry frontally at the end of the Saturday
Charging out of a Chateau when the French had us surrounded.
The local hospitality (utterly fantastic - when watering the horses at a village pond locals who were having their own shin-dig shared their wine, bread, and cold meat with us.)

But best of all…..

We were detached as a half sub division to try and lure the French away from the column on Sunday morning, so we rode about a mile in a direction that we were told to go in with the intention of firing a few rounds off and gaining the French attention.

We found a suitable spot and also scouted out an escape route. One issue we did have was the horses, although well schooled, did not like gunfire (with the exception Sgt Williams mount who wasn't really phased by much at all). I had also suffered a kick to the leg the day before and had 4 stitches in my shin, so I wasn't confident about having the strongest legs in the world when it came to controlling an excited horse

We dismounted, the horse holder withdrawing with the mounts, we fired a volley, and proceeded to fire another 4 rounds each at our leisure.

As we finished we turned around, and there were 7 Chasseurs au Cheval (12th Chasseurs) watching us and wandering what the hell we were doing. Nick withdrew in to the woods with the horses, and we supported his rear with our carbines as he went.

We lashed the carbines to the saddles and started to re-mount - which I found difficult due to the stitches. The French officers came in to the woods to enquire about our surrender, the chasseurs started circling us (2 on the path and 4 in the woods) and I just manage to mount in time, leave the woods at a flat gallop bursting between the two chasseurs that were heading me off with the rest of the vedette bringing up the rear. After a hundred meter or so we reined up and reformed to counter charge in case they came in our direction, but they just watched us from the road. Sgt Williams decided that we should not lead them towards the column but head away from it. In doing this we then found the rest of the French cavalry.

So followed a swift and speedy escape that Flashman himself would have been proud of in to the grounds of a chateau a couple of miles away.


Needless to say, the real stars of the event for us were the horses. They were exceptionally well schooled, and despite never having done re-enactment before they warmed to the task very well.



Emsdorf and Victory,
Andy


Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Postby Marc Middleton » Mon Jan 05, 2009 5:14 pm

Image

Some Riflemen talk with a private from the Buffs.

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Dutch soldiers at their Friday night bivouac.

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The Dutch are bedded and the British cavalry elects to sleep it rough without a shelter.

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Captain Draak of the 7th Dutch Infantry (and Allied commander) talks with his sergent whilst a 42nd Royal Highlander looks on.

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Dutch soldiers and their Saturday night shelter.

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Pionner McCamley of the Buffs and a soldier of the Oranje-Nassau regiment on Saturday evening.

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Riflemen are also preparing to pass off into sleep.

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A soldier of the 95th admires the French countryside in 1815.

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A 42nd sentry and a patrol of the 15th Light Dragoons on Saturday evening.

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Cavalrymen of the 15th Light Dragoons (Hussars)

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The Allied commander, Capitain Draak of the 7th Dutch Infantry talks to his logisitcal commander, Ensign Kontos of the Royal Regiment of Malta.

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The Allies prepare to depart on Sunday morning.

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Soldiers taking a well-earned rest after capturing the French camp.

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The Allied commander is acclaimed by his soldiers in the presence of French prisoners.



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Postby Havercake Lad » Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:03 am

Damn the date change. Would love to attend this one year !


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Re: Le Boissier-Ecole - best event ever

Postby Marc Middleton » Mon Oct 26, 2009 11:29 pm

Please note that the La Boissiére-Ecole 1815 campaign (edition 2010) will take place on 4-5 September 2010!



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Re: Le Boissier-Ecole - best event ever

Postby Andy R » Tue Oct 27, 2009 12:29 pm

Have put a post up in the events section


Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die



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Re: Le Boissier-Ecole - best event ever

Postby wurzul » Fri Oct 30, 2009 8:20 am

We are already double-booked for this date. Hard decisions ahead.



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Re: Le Boissier-Ecole - best event ever

Postby Andy R » Fri Oct 30, 2009 9:13 am

Hi Ben,

What's on that weekend?

We don't have another clash with a big Napoleonic event do we?

We were hoping to get more British foot units over this year.


Cheers,
Andy


Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die



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Re: Le Boissier-Ecole - best event ever

Postby wurzul » Sat Oct 31, 2009 8:40 am

Not a big event, a unit fundraiser just for our group. We will be in Spain the weekend before for an event which might affect our numbers for Boissiere. Not me, I'm booking all the leave now, might even do a roadtrip from England to Spain to France.




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