The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

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The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Henri De Ceredigion » Fri Oct 18, 2013 10:55 pm

Members may like to know that the latest installment of "The (Historical Period) Farm" that has looked at World War II and the Victorian era has been comissioned and will be look at the Tudor period. The following comes from the BBC website:

Historian Ruth Goodman and archaeologists Peter Ginn and Tom Pinfold turn the clock back over 500 years to run a farm at the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum in West Sussex exactly as it would have been in 1500, during the reign of the first Tudor King, Henry VII.

The biggest land-owners of the age, other than the King, were the monasteries. These ancient religious institutions dominated the landscape, not just in matters of worship but almost every aspect of life from education and crafts to commerce and the main industry of the era: farming.

With the lives of monks dedicated to prayer and religious rites, they needed ordinary people to supply the agricultural labour on their lands. Ruth, Peter and Tom will be doing the work of tenants on a farm owned by the monastery, using only the tools and materials of the age. At a time when faith provided an explanation for everything, from the state of the weather to the growth of crops, the team takes on new challenges to raise livestock, cultivate period crops and master new crafts under the watchful eye of their monastic landlords.

The turn of the 16th century saw England emerging from the medieval Dark Ages. Under the first Tudor monarch, the country was enjoying a period of peace and stability after years of plague, famine and war. And a new breed of enterprising farmer was boosting food production and profiting from the land as never before.

A transmission date has not yet been published, but it will be shown on BBC Two and in HDMembers may like to know that the latest installment of "The (Historical Period) Farm" that has looked at World War II and the Victorian era has been comissioned and will be look at the Tudor period. The following comes from the BBC website:

Historian Ruth Goodman and archaeologists Peter Ginn and Tom Pinfold turn the clock back over 500 years to run a farm at the Weald & Downland Open Air Museum in West Sussex exactly as it would have been in 1500, during the reign of the first Tudor King, Henry VII.

The biggest land-owners of the age, other than the King, were the monasteries. These ancient religious institutions dominated the landscape, not just in matters of worship but almost every aspect of life from education and crafts to commerce and the main industry of the era: farming.

With the lives of monks dedicated to prayer and religious rites, they needed ordinary people to supply the agricultural labour on their lands. Ruth, Peter and Tom will be doing the work of tenants on a farm owned by the monastery, using only the tools and materials of the age. At a time when faith provided an explanation for everything, from the state of the weather to the growth of crops, the team takes on new challenges to raise livestock, cultivate period crops and master new crafts under the watchful eye of their monastic landlords.

The turn of the 16th century saw England emerging from the medieval Dark Ages. Under the first Tudor monarch, the country was enjoying a period of peace and stability after years of plague, famine and war. And a new breed of enterprising farmer was boosting food production and profiting from the land as never before.

A transmission date has not yet been published, but it will be shown on BBC Two and in HD



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Wim-Jaap » Sat Oct 19, 2013 8:49 am

ohhh that's nice!!!


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Simon Atford » Sat Oct 19, 2013 9:21 am

So about a century earlier than Green Valley then. Interesting.



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Foxe » Sat Oct 19, 2013 11:31 am

I was wondering how they were going to follow Victorian, Edwardian, and wartime farms. Pity, I was really looking forward to the chronologically logical "60s Hippy Commune"


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Mark Griffin » Sat Oct 19, 2013 7:21 pm

Personally it was going to be the early 70's I was hankering after. Icecream that still came in blocks wrapped in cardboard, 3 day working week, terrible hair, trousers and...everything. Bet Ruth would love bombing around on a Raleigh Chopper though....


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Miss Costello » Sun Oct 20, 2013 9:28 am

I'm glad they're returning to an era they're actually knowledgeable about!



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Simon Atford » Sun Oct 20, 2013 11:14 am

What about an 18th Century series? It would bridge the gap between Green Valley and Victorian Farm.



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Mark Griffin » Sun Oct 20, 2013 11:28 am

and a bit of machine breaking never did any harm!


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby guthrie » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:16 pm

Mark Griffin wrote:and a bit of machine breaking never did any harm!

Yes, the mechanisation of farming and all the improvements in that century are surely rather a big story to tell.

By contrast, I am not an expert but have trouble thinking of any major differences between the mid 17th C and 1500 in terms of day to day farm work. There'd been more specialist breeding of animals, and I think by the 17th century most people knew more about the importance of drainage and feeding the land and so on, but what differences were there? I suppose I'll have to wait and see.


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Mark Griffin » Sun Oct 20, 2013 1:43 pm

18th cent farm Episode 1

The residents of home Farm are surpised when ballifs arrive to turf them out without notice. As they are forced to leave Lancelot Brown and a team of labourers arrived to sweep away the buildings and build his Lordship a nice new park.



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Brother Kevfael » Mon Oct 21, 2013 5:23 pm

To be honest, I will watch it but I have my doubts about it. I brought the book of the series, yet there are no references or any sources for the information at all, Never a good sign.



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Mark Griffin » Mon Oct 21, 2013 5:43 pm

Brother Kevfael wrote:To be honest, I will watch it but I have my doubts about it. I brought the book of the series, yet there are no references or any sources for the information at all, Never a good sign.


Doubt the book is aimed ant anyone with an academic bent or who would ever study footnotes, a glossary etc...


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Brother Kevfael » Mon Oct 21, 2013 6:09 pm

Doubt the book is aimed ant anyone with an academic bent or who would ever study footnotes, a glossary etc...


You don't have to be an academic to want to pursue information, but there isn't even a suggested reading list so people can follow stuff up if they are interested.

I will watch with a sceptical eye....but archers be warned, according to the book you "fire" a bow.....



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Hraefn » Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:33 pm

Plus the production company decided that Tudor codpieces would upset the rubes so 'banned' them =o/


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Tod » Thu Oct 24, 2013 3:03 pm

guthrie wrote:By contrast, I am not an expert but have trouble thinking of any major differences between the mid 17th C and 1500 in terms of day to day farm work. There'd been more specialist breeding of animals, and I think by the 17th century most people knew more about the importance of drainage and feeding the land and so on, but what differences were there? I suppose I'll have to wait and see.


That thought crossed my mind, I suppose the poor walking all across your land instead of soldiers either way you get free manure. Other than that I cna't think of much.



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Mark Griffin » Thu Oct 24, 2013 3:31 pm

Bigger horses for sure.If they start using draught horses for early Tudor thats a no-no


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby guthrie » Fri Oct 25, 2013 12:44 am

Hraefn wrote:Plus the production company decided that Tudor codpieces would upset the rubes so 'banned' them =o/

Really? that's so possible yet I'd like some better evidence before I start ranting about the stupidity of production companies.


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby EnglishArcher » Fri Oct 25, 2013 12:57 am

guthrie wrote:
Hraefn wrote:Plus the production company decided that Tudor codpieces would upset the rubes so 'banned' them =o/

Really? that's so possible yet I'd like some better evidence before I start ranting about the stupidity of production companies.


Start ranting. It is true.

Christine Carnie designed and made the garments for Ruth and Peter. The designs are based on English woodcuts from around 1500 and completely handsewn from antique linens and veg-dyed cloth.

The garments for Tom were supplied by Weald and Downland museum.

Lion TV were worried that the codpieces would be considered indecent; despite their historical accuracy.

Christine, Peter and Ruth fought with the producers to include the codpieces but, ultimately, Lion demanded that 'over hose' be provided. Christine refused and they were then supplied from another source.

In the end, Peter had to wear his gaskins from Tales from the Green Valley.


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby guthrie » Fri Oct 25, 2013 11:59 am

ARGH RANT RANT RANT
morons. So it's okay to have page 3 girls, highly sexualised billboards of underwear models showing more detail than you can possibly make out through layers of wool and such, and yet codpieces are indecent? Someone is really messed up.


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Alan E » Fri Oct 25, 2013 12:12 pm

They probably thought things would fall out as the men walked around :P


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Miss Costello » Sat Oct 26, 2013 11:31 am

Sensibilities be damned! I'm sad that they have been forced into more inaccuracies... :-x



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby guthrie » Sun Oct 27, 2013 7:07 pm

Miss Costello wrote:Sensibilities be damned! I'm sad that they have been forced into more inaccuracies... :-x

WAit, MORE inaccuracies? What others have there been?


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Miss Costello » Sun Oct 27, 2013 8:05 pm

Ref. 'The wartime farm'....where shall I start?



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Henri De Ceredigion » Fri Nov 01, 2013 6:15 pm

The BBC have just announced online that the series will air from 9pm to 10pm for six weeks starting on Wednesday, November 13th 2013 and finish on December 18th 2013



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Brother Ranulf » Mon Nov 11, 2013 10:46 pm

Yes, looking forward to Wednesday evening's opening instalment.

One thing that does concern me is the "monastery" bit in "Tudor Monastery Farm", since almost nothing is known about the layout and structure of monastic granges at any period, beyond the barns that continued in use after the Dissolution. The late Mick Aston would have raised an eyebrow (or two) at the idea that a tv series could be produced with so little academic/archaeological/historical/documentary basis.

1500 is also the beginning of a huge decline in the monastic system, with many smaller houses such as Milton Abbey becoming effectively bankrupt and unable to maintain their own holdings, selling off swathes of land and property to make up the shortfall. Some of the blame for this rests with increasingly heavy levels of taxation under successive kings. It was not quite the era of "newfound stability and prosperity under the reign of its first Tudor King, Henry VII" that the publicity for the series would suggest.

Granges are only known in the vaguest of general terms, so I will be watching with great interest.


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Brother Kevfael » Thu Nov 14, 2013 7:30 am

Watched the first episode. Much of the stuff was outside of my field of interest so cannot comment, but it was nice to see Robin Wood in it and that Jack Green will be in an upcoming episode.



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Brother Ranulf » Thu Nov 14, 2013 10:53 am

Likewise, much of it was outside my field of knowledge but good to see the emphasis on the role of religion in everyday life.

As for the monastic aspect - :@

Professor James Clark of Exeter University appears as an expert in monastic life and series consultant. Why, then, was he dressed as a comedy monk?

According to the University (http://www.exeter.ac.uk/news/featuredne ... 67_en.html) he is wearing an "authentic medieval habit"; if that is authentic then I am the Turkish ambassador to Jupiter. Either his clothing was produced by an unbelievably incompetent costume designer, or it was bought as a "Halloween funny monk outfit" on Ebay, or it was an appalling Christmas gift from a demented aunt who bought some black remnants in a charity shop. It had a V-neck ( :wtf: ), it was 10 sizes too small and 6 inches too short, the sleeves were :crazy: and the material was far from being "coarse wool". I felt hugely embarrassed for the poor man.

Even a five-minute scan of Google Images looking for "Benedictine monk 1500" or "monk 15th century" turns up genuine period images of the real habits worn at that time. They are made of several acres of heavy wool cloth, they have round necks, they reach the ground and the sleeves are very long and very wide:

Benedicine monks 15th century.jpg
Benedicine monks 15th century.jpg (57.06 KiB) Viewed 5374 times


monks c1500 signorelli.jpg


monk 1500 french.jpg
monk 1500 french.jpg (13.6 KiB) Viewed 5374 times


There was a brief view of monks eating in a refectory which was laid out more like a transport caf. Real monastic refectories had long tables set near the walls with an open space in the centre; monks sat with their backs to the wall and nobody sat on the other side of these tables. This was an intelligent and logical layout, since servants could bring the food to the tables without leaning across the shoulders of anyone.


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby steve stanley » Mon Nov 18, 2013 1:42 pm

While I shall still watch......I think they're all more designed for a mass audience than the original "Green Valley"........


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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Tod » Thu Nov 21, 2013 1:59 am

I was disappointed and won't watch the rest of the series unless there is nothing else on.
I was also asked to change my codpiece for a flat one by a site, as it happens I changed it back :wink:



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Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Postby Phil the Grips » Thu Nov 21, 2013 9:55 am

Seems a weird mix of kit- why not have folk in decent clobber wear decent clobber and the experts turn up in neutral modern clothes rather than wearing glasses with what seems to be whatever any passing re-enactor had spare in the boot of their car?

It does seem to have gone the way of Time Team in levels of banality over time.


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