Mary Rose 1545 basket hilt sword

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Kate Tiler
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Mary Rose 1545 basket hilt sword

Post by Kate Tiler »

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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

John Lippiett, chief executive of The Mary Rose Trust, said: "Even after 437 years in the sea, the sword is still wonderfully balanced and the edge of the blade near the hilt is sharp enough to cut."

Coooooooooooooooo!
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Phil the Grips
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Post by Phil the Grips »

Tis a luvverly piece and one of my favourites form the historical record of that type of sword- now I get a chance to look at it for real and hope it is as nice as the Teviotdale sword I got to play with at the start of the year.

Strange thing to say though that basket hilts aren't originally Scottish- we've known that for decades as examples exist from all over the continent, it's just that the Scots persisted with them for far longer and developed their own characteristic form.
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Tod
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Post by Tod »

It looks like a swept hilt with a longer guard rather than a true basket hilt.

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Phil the Grips
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Post by Phil the Grips »

Nope- definitely an early form of the basket hilted broadsword, it's just that originally the guard only protected the outside of the hand, before later developing into the "caged" form such as the ribbon hilt etc.

Complex hiltd "broad"swords (a Victorian term to differentiate from sabres, which had a curved blade) can be dated to the late c15th on the Continent for certain, with finger rings, knucklebows and the like which then developed into the is form and other like it- the schiavona for example.

The clearest published image of this sword I can think of (without rifling through books) is in Terry Brown's "English Martial Arts".
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Post by Mark »

We visited last week so that we saw the MR before she is taken off public view for three years.The museum and and the whole historic Dockyard is well worth a visit and fantastic value at £18 an adult.
Oggie.

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